2020 Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars

Addressing Common Barriers and Objections to Beaver Restoration Work

Held Thursday, December 10, 2020 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern


INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This fourth webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on common barriers to beaver restoration and beaver dam analog (BDA) work and when/how these barriers can be overcome. Common local landowner concerns include the taking of water from downstream water users, the potential for infrastructure damage, and a general intolerance for dam building activities. Common barriers to project success include long delays associated with the NEPA process and inability to sustain strong, diverse and long-lasting project partners. This webinar provided case studies from Utah and Idaho and will provide insights on best management practices for successful beaver restoration and BDA work.

BIOS 

Wally MacfarlaneWally Macfarlane is a veteran geospatial professional with 20 years of experience developing and using innovative GIS, and remote sensing techniques to assess climate and land-use induced environmental change. Wally was instrumental in leading the development of BRAT (Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool) and RCAT (Riparian Condition Assessment Tool). As Wally's research started to focus more on planning and prioritization tools for restoration and conservation, he began getting more involved in on-the-ground low tech processed based restoration. Wally now leads several of his own restoration projects throughout Utah. Wally manages the Ecogeomorphlogy and Topographic Analysis Lab (ETAL).

Wally earned an MS in Environmental Science from Bard College in 1999. Before that he earned a BS in Environmental Studies from Utah State University.

When he's not launching himself off a waterfall or cliff, he's usually out exploring similarly beautiful landscapes with his two sons and wife Sammie. Wally is a walking atlas of most rivers and peaks within 4 hours of Utah and everywhere in the state.

Justin JimenezJustin Jimene, is a veteran fisheries biologist and riparian professional with over 30 years of experience working with the Forest Service in OR, ID, UT, CO, MT and AZ as well as the Bureau of Land Management in UT and ID. Justin’s experience has primarily involved working with native aquatic species in forested and desert environments with an emphasis in habitat assessment, inventory and monitoring (Framework and Indicators for Lotic Systems). Justin has focused on developing partnerships and collaborating with others to have success in all aspects of aquatic habitat management. The integration of science into aquatic habitat management and restoration has been a priority for Justin including assisting with the development of a science based process for completing river restoration that can be applied to imperiled river ecosystems (Science-Based Restoration Planning). With limited budgets and a plethora of restoration opportunities, Justin and partners restoration efforts have focused more on low tech processed based restoration (Low-Tech Process-Based Restoration of Riverscapes: Design Manual. Version 1.0). Justin is currently the Aquatic Habitat Management Program Lead for the BLM UT.

Justin earned a BS in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology from Utah State University in 1993.

Justin’s passion is exploring and enjoying lotic systems whether it is in a whitewater kayak, raft, paddleboard or packraft. He also enjoys skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, hunting and fishing. Justin takes pleasure in sharing these activities with his daughter and son.

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management
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Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management

Part 2: Presenters: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management and Wally MacFarlane, Utah State University
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Part 2: Presenters: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management and Wally MacFarlane, Utah State University

Part 3: Questions & Answers
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Part 3: Questions & Answers

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<b>Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management</b>
<b>Part 2: Presenters: Justin Jimenez, Bureau of Land Management and Wally MacFarlane, Utah State University</b>
Part 3: Questions & Answers
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 Case Studies of Long-term Changes from Beaver Restoration Activities

Held Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

• Ellen Wohl, Colorado State University [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
• 
Nick Bouwes, Utah State University [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABTRACT

This third webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the long-term changes in riverscapes that result from beaver restoration.  Where intense stream restoration is needed, people are identifying low-tech process-based methods that combine the management of grazing, beaver and other approaches that engage processes to create self-sustaining solutions.  Understanding the dynamic nature of these systems is important to understanding where and how they can be useful.  The webinar shared case studies of work completed, focusing on the use of beaver to restore riverscapes.

BIOS

Ellen Wohl, Colorado State UniversityEllen Wohl received a BS in geology from Arizona State University and a PhD in geosciences from University of Arizona. She has been on the geosciences faculty at Colorado State University since 1989. Her research is field-based and focuses on interactions between physical process and form and biota in river corridors, including the effects of beavers. She has written several books for non-specialists, including “Saving the Dammed: Why We Need Beaver-Modified Ecosystems” (2019, Oxford University Press).

Nick BouwesNick Bouwes earned his BS in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and MS and PhD in Aquatic Ecology at Utah State University. He is owner of Eco Logical Research, co-owner of Anabranch Solutions, and an adjunct faculty in the Department of Watershed Science and director of the Beaver Ecology and Relocation Center at Utah State University. He uses modeling, monitoring and adaptive management to understand riverscapes processes to inform restoration and management. He has been involved in developing and teaching low-tech processed based restoration strategies with an emphasis on mimicking, promoting, and. sustaining beaver dam activity to restore riverscapes. 

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
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Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Ellen Wohl, Colorado State University

Part 2: Presenter: Nick Bouwes, Utah State University
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Part 2: Presenter: Nick Bouwes, Utah State University

Part 3: Questions & Answers
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Part 3: Questions & Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of  State Wetland Managers 
Part 2: Presenter: Nick Bouwes, Utah State University
Part 3: Questions & Answers
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Identifying Where to Place Beavers and When to Use Beaver Mimicry for Low Tech Restoration in the Arid West

Held Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTER

ABSTRACT

This second webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on making decisions about where beaver restoration and/or the use of beaver dam analogs (BDA) can have the greatest positive and least negative impacts. Understanding that beaver restoration is not well-suited for all contexts and purposes, this webinar discussed risk assessment and introduce participants to the primary elements required to assess the efficacy of beaver projects for specific watersheds and sites. The webinar covered how data can be used to make decisions about different kinds of flow devices and when beaver mimicry/BDAs make more sense. The webinar included a demonstration of Utah State University’s Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT), a model that helps planners assess key parameters (such as human interaction, hydrological setting, etc.) essential to beaver work. The webinar ended with discussion about the importance of post-construction monitoring.

BIO

Joe WheatonJoe Wheaton is an Associate Professor at Utah State University and a fluvial geomorphologist with over eighteen years of experience in river restoration. Joe's research is focused on better understanding the dynamics of riverscapes, how such fluvial processes shape instream and riparian habitats, and how biota modulate and amplify those processes. Joe co-founded the Restoration Consortium at USU, is the lead author of the Low-Tech Process-Based Restoration of Riverscapes Design Manual and a principle and co-founder of a design-build restoration firm, Anabranch Solutions

 

 


Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State University

Part 2: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State University
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Part 2: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State University

Part 3: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State University
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Part 3: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State University

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State  University
Part 3: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State  University
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The History of Beaver and the Ecosystem Services They Provide

Held Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This first webinar in the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) co-hosted six-part webinar series on beaver restoration provided the historical background of beaver on the land and the impacts from loss of beaver (through various hunting, trapping and removal activities) in terms of hydrology. The webinar shared what valley bottoms can be with restoration of hydrology and the role that beavers and beaver dam analogs (BDAs) can play in that restoration. The webinar explained the Stage Zero concept and unpack the challenges created by common practices that have been restoring streams to their first point of failure.

This webinar set the stage for future webinars providing case studies on the results of beaver restoration activities, addressing common barriers and objections to beaver work, identifying where and where not to place these projects, as well as insights on navigating the regulatory environment and stakeholder engagement, as well as what resources are currently available to help those interested in beaver restoration or explaining its value (when used in the right context) to others. 

 

           
   Submitted by Kent Sorenson, Utah Division of Wildlife

 

BIOS

Kent SorensonKent Sorenson is an Assistant Habitat Manager With the Utah Division of Wildlife. Kent is active in beaver restoration work in the arid west and has been working in habitat restoration since April 2006. Based on coursework he has completed, Kent incorporates Rosgen fluvial geomorphology and river restoration and sediment transport considerations. He also partners with Beaver River Restoration. Kent has a M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Ecology from Oklahoma State University and a B.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from South Dakota State University.

Amy ChadwickAmy Chadwick is the lead Ecologist with Great West Engineering. She holds a B.A. in Biology from The Colorado College and a Master of Science in Forestry (watershed focus) form university of Montana. Amy has been working in wetland and stream restoration in Montana for 18 years and regularly gives presentations and provides training in workshops and on projects to teach people about beavers and stream dynamics, non-lethal beaver management, and process-based restoration aligned with the zero stage restoration principle. She has been involved in the Montana Beaver Working Group since its inception seven years ago and continues to pursue and support efforts to restore stream processes and beaver populations. 



Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Kent Sorenson, Habitat Restoration Biologist, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

Part 2: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great West Engineering
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Part 2: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great West Engineering

Part 3: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great West Engineering
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Part 3: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great West Engineering/b>

Part 4: Questions & Answers
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Part 4: Questions & Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great West Engineering
Part 3: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great  West Engineering
Part 4: Questions & Answers
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View Past Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here

2021
 

View a List of Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here

Certificate of Participation for Capacity Building Webinar

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the November 13, 2020 Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Project Webinar Series: Filling Wetland Regulatory Gaps: Approaches and Lessons Learned

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Capacity Building webinar “Filling Wetland Regulatory Gaps: Approaches and Lessons Learned” on Friday, November 13, 2020 from 2:00-4:00 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:Non-Member Certificate

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation for Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the February 12, 2020 Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar: NWI Unfinished Business: The Current State of Wetland Mapping in Alaska

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar: NWI Unfinished Business: The Current State of Wetland Mapping in Alaska on Wednesday, February 12, 2020 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Invasive Species Webinars

In 2017, the Association of State Wetland Managers partnered withU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Coastal Program to organize and host a mini webinar series on best management practices for invasive species management in wetlands in coastal areas of the country. Special attention was paid to ecosystem service provision and the diverse strategies that may be employed to manage or eradicate an invasive species based on the species, region of the U.S. where it is located, and considerations associated with climate change. 

For more information and/or to join our email list for notices about upcoming events, please contact Laura Burchill at or (207) 892-3399. 

View a List of Invasive Speices Webinar Recordings Here


Please click on a year below to view past webinars.

2018

2017


Other Invasive Species Webinars of Interest:

Held April 26, 2016

Managing Invasive Species in Wetland Restoration Projects: Considerations for Common Reed, Reed Canary Grass, Purple Loosestrife, Nutria and Feral Hogs

 

 

2018 Invasive Species Webinars

Invasive Species Databases: An In-depth Look at EDDMapS, the USGS Non-Indigenous Aquatic Species Database, and NEMESIS

Held Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 3pm EST 

INTRODUCTION

Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

Chuck Bargeron

EDDMapS’ primary goal is to discover the existing range and leading edge of invasive species while documenting vital information about the species and habitat using standardized data collection protocols. EDDMapS allows for data from many organizations and groups to be combined into one database to show a better map of the range of an invasive species.  Goals of the current project include: integration of existing regional datasets, increase search options on EDDMapS website, update NAISMA Invasive Species Mapping Standards, and coordinate with local, state and regional organizations to develop early detection networks.  After twelve years of development of EDDMapS, it has become clear that these local organizations are key to developing a successful early detection and rapid response network.  The University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health has released 15 apps to support data entry into EDDMapS.

Pam Fuller

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database first began in the early 1990s with the passage of legislation related to zebra mussels. Since that time, the group has tracked the distribution of non-native aquatic species nationwide. At present, we focus primarily on freshwater species in the continental US and island territories. The system primarily tracks fish, crustaceans, mollusks, reptiles and amphibians, and obligate aquatic plants. The Program’s interactive website allows users to perform a variety of queries, download data, obtain information from species profiles, and see animations of species’ spread. There is an alert system connected to the database. Registered users receive email alerts when a species of interest is found in a new area. Other components recently added include NAS FaST – the Flood and Storm Tracker which can be used to predict where species may have moved into new drainages based on flooding. The NAS ARM, alert risk mapper, will show the extent of possible initial dispersal based on biology and barriers.

BIOS

Chuck Bargeron has been with the University of Georgia for 19 years where his work focuses on invasive species and information technology.  He has a B.S. and M.S in Computer Science.   Websites that he designed have been featured twice in Science Magazine and have received over 1.7 billion hits since 2002.  Chuck developed the infrastructure behind Bugwood Images which runs the ForestryImages.org and Invasive.org websites. Recently, Chuck has focused on mapping invasive species and tools for Early Detection and Rapid Response using EDDMapS and smartphone applications. He has led development of 26 smartphone applications including the first apps for the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service.  He was appointed to the National Invasive Species Advisory Council in 2013 and elected as Chair in 2018. Chuck has been an invited speaker at over 80 regional and national conferences and co-authored over 20 journal articles and outreach publications.

Pam Fuller is the program leader for the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program which maintains a nationwide database and a web site of aquatic invaders. She started with the program in its infancy and has developed it to its current state over the past 26 years. Fuller has authored many scientific publications on the topic of aquatic invasive species. She has been involved in numerous national and international invasive species research activities and work groups, particularly in the field of invasive species information management. Ms. Fuller enjoys the work she does because it is so multifaceted. Her work requires knowledge of zoogeography, taxonomy, ecology, databases and web design.

Gregory Ruiz is a marine ecologist with active research interests in invasion biology, biogeography, and ecology in coastal marine ecosystems.  He heads a research group of ~ 40 full-time biologists, based at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) laboratories, located on Chesapeake Bay and San Francisco Bay. Most of his research explores the patterns, mechanisms, and consequences of marine invasions at a multiple spatial and temporal scales. He conducts extensive comparative measurements and experiments among estuaries along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts for North America.  A Senior Scientist at SERC for over 25 years, Greg also is a Research Professor and founding co-director of the Aquatic BioInvasion Research and Policy Institute at Portland State University.  Greg has published over 140 scientific articles as author or coauthor, focusing primarily on marine invasion ecology and management. He began his career in California and has broad interests in marine biology and dynamics of coastal ecosystems. Greg holds a Ph.D. in zoology from University of California, Berkeley and a B.A. in aquatic biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  For additional information visit SERC’s Marine Invasion Research Laboratory website at http://invasions.si.edu/.

Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia

Part 2: Presenter: Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia
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Part 2: Presenter: Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgiay

Part 3: Presenter: Pam Fuller, U.S. Geological Survey, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program
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Part 3: Presenter: Pam Fuller, U.S. Geological Survey, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program

Part 4: Presenter: Gregory Ruiz, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
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Part 4: Presenter: Gregory Ruiz, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Part 5: Questions/Answers
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Part 5: Questions/Answers

Part 6: Questions/Answers
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Part 6: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia
Part 3: Presenter: Pam Fuller, U.S. Geological Survey, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program
Part 4: Presenter: Gregory Ruiz, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Part 5: Questions/Answers
Part 6: Questions/Answers
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Phragmites australis: Current Research and Experiments in Control Strategies for Wetland Habitat Recovery


Held Wednesday - February 21, 2018 - 3pm EST
 

INTRODUCTION 

Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

Dr. Karin Kettenring and Christine Rohal

Phragmites australis has aggressively invaded wetlands in northern Utah including wetlands along the iconic Great Salt Lake.  Since 2010, Utah State University researchers and wetlands managers have partnered to improves Phragmites management techniques and outcomes.  In this talk we will discuss (1) how a formal manager survey informed a Phragmites management research experiment, and (2) how these Phragmites management experiments yielded important insights into how best to control Phragmites and the potential for habitat recovery.

Dr. Andrea Dávalos

Land manager organizations spend significant resources controlling invasive plants, yet there is surprisingly little evidence to assess success of invasive plant management.  The rapid range expansions of invasive Phragmites australis in North America have prompted large-scale control efforts, although with limited success.  Assessment of P. australis management in the Adirondack Park, New York State shows that eradication, through herbicide application, is only achievable for the smallest populations. Long-term control of the invasion will require continuous use of herbicides, not only jeopardizing native wetland biota but also threatening existence of the endemic subspecies P. australis americanus.  Alternatively, biological control is a promising and safer tool.  Two European stem mining noctuids show very strong, but not absolute, preference for invasive P. australis.  Demographic techniques are being implemented to improve host-specificity assessment and evaluate management success.  Invasive species management should go beyond short-term suppression of target plants and should incorporate quantitative measurements of outcomes.

BIOS

Dr. Karin Kettenring is a faculty member in the Department of Watershed Sciences, Quinney College of Natural Resources, Utah State University in Logan, Utah.  She has a B.A. in biology from Oberlin College. She received her Ph.D. in applied plant sciences from the University of Minnesota where she worked with Dr. Susan Galatowitsch. Her Ph.D. research focused on restoration of sedges in prairie pothole wetlands. She was also a Postdoctoral Fellow with Dr. Dennis Whigham at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center where she studied the invasion of Phragmites australis in Chesapeake Bay tidal wetlands. She has been a faculty member at USU since 2008. Her current research efforts focus on (1) the ecology, genetics, and management of wetland invaders, (2) seed ecology of native wetlands plants, with implications for wetland revegetation, and (3) restoration genetics for sustainable, functioning wetland restorations. 

Christine Rohal is a PhD student Karin Kettenring's Wetland Ecology lab at Utah State University in Logan, Utah.  Her research focuses on applied questions related to restoring wetland habitats degraded by invasive plant species.  Before she moved to Utah for her graduate studies, she worked on habitat restoration projects in Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, Grand Canyon National Park, and on the beaches of Jacksonville, Florida.   

Dr. Andrea Dávalos is an Assistant Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at the State University of New York at Cortland.  Her research is motivated by a strong interest in conservation and in the development of tools to restore natural ecosystems.  She is particularly interested in addressing issues pertaining to the ecology and management of biological invasions and the factors that drive successful control programs.  Her long-term collaborative research combines experimental and modeling approaches to assess impacts of invasive plants and success of management programs.    




Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Karin Kettenring, Utah State University

Part 2: Presenters: Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University
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Part 2: Presenters: Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University

Part 3: Presenters: Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University
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Part 3: Presenters: Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University

Part 4: Presenter: Andrea Davalos, State University of New York
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Part 4: Presenter: Andrea Davalos, State University of New York

Part 5: Questions and Answers
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Part 5: Questions and Answers

Part 6: Questions and Answers
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Part 6: Questions and Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenters:  Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University
Part 3: Presenters:  Karin Kettenring, Utah State University and Christine Rohal, PhD Candidate, Utah State University
Part 4: Presenter: Andrea Davalos, State University of New York
Part 5: Questions and Answers
Part 6: Questions and Answers
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Managing Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: Establishing Goals & Objectives, Monitoring Programs, and Cooperative Management Areas in Michigan

Held Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 3:00 p.m. ET 

INTRODUCTION

Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

Gregory J. Norwood

Beyond weed control: Establishing ecosystem goals, objectives, and desired outcomes for degraded coastal wetlands

Invasive plant removal is usually an integral part of coastal wetland restoration projects, sometimes at a relatively high cost. While there is acceptance of the biodiversity loss associated with invasive plants such as reed (Phragmites australis) and narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia and T. x glauca), managers are ultimately responsible for considering trade-offs of various intervention strategies. This talk describes the importance of establishing ecosystem goals and objectives to achieve specific conservation outcomes before invasive species control efforts begin so that decisions about trade-offs become easier. Examples from western Lake Erie will reveal a wide range of desired outcomes because of various local constraints such as the nature of the surrounding landscape. Desired conservation outcomes are more likely to be achieved if there is clear linkage between invasive species removal and the stated project goals and objectives. Removal of invasive species always involves difficult trade-offs; however, practitioners frequently monitor acres treated instead of the overall impacts of control projects in achieving their conservation goals.

Dr. Don Uzarski

Monitoring multiple biological attributes in the Great Lakes coastal wetlands: database access for invasive species management

Since European settlement, over 50% of Laurentian Great Lakes coastal wetlands have been lost, causing growing concern by government agencies. To facilitate information sharing between public, private, and government agencies throughout the basin, we developed standardized methods and indicators used for assessing wetland condition. Using an ecosystem approach, birds, anurans, fish, macroinvertebrates, vegetation, and physicochemical conditions were sampled in coastal wetlands of all five Great Lakes, US and Canada. Our primary objective was to implement a standardized basin-wide monitoring program that would be a powerful tool to inform coastal wetland conservation and restoration priorities throughout the basin.

Ryan Wheeler

Creating and empowering cooperative invasive species management areas across Michigan with multi-scaled support networks.

The challenges associated with Invasive Species Management span geo-political boundaries, property ownership boundaries, and even human values. In order to overcome these challenges, it can be beneficial to view individual invasive species problems as part of a much bigger picture. Regional Cooperative Invasive Species efforts are a practical implementation of this “big picture” mindset. This presentation will cover recent efforts to create and empower Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas across all of Michigan. It will also cover several networks that continue to provide critical support and value to these groups at local, state, and basin-wide scales.

BIOS

Greg J. Norwood serves as Invasive Species Coordinator for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources – Wildlife Division. Previously, he was a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge where he was involved in forming the Detroit River-Western Lake Erie Cooperative Weed Management Area which includes some of the “weediest” natural areas in the state. Most of his work involved a variety of natural area projects, including adding land to the Refuge, prescribed fire, ecological inventories, wetland impoundment management, transitioning agricultural fields to other habitat, facilitating public use, and prescribed fire. Currently, he assists the Division and partners with decisions and strategy surrounding invasive species. 

Dr. Don Uzarski, CMU Professor of Biology, serves as the Director of CMU’s Institute for Great Lakes Research and Biological Station on Beaver Island, MI. He is a limnologist and aquatic ecologist with a focus on measures of ecosystem health of Great Lakes coastal wetlands.

Uzarski leads a 10-year $20 million Great Lakes coastal wetland-monitoring program for the US EPA. He can speak to a wide range of topics including human impacts on waterways, indicators of ecosystem health, pollution and runoff and the overall health of the Great Lakes. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed manuscripts, most of which have been wetlands related. His work has been cited in scientific journals over 1200 times.

Ryan Wheeler is the Invasive Species Biologist for Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources, Forest Resources and Wildlife Divisions. Ryan works on many aspects of comprehensive invasive species management, with an emphasis on building and strengthening collaborative partnerships. Some of Ryan’s key responsibilities include serving as technical contact for projects funded by Michigan’s invasive species grant program and leading a multi-agency committee working on decontamination policy and recommendations for preventing the spread of invasive species in Michigan. Ryan also serves on the boards of the Michigan Wetland Association and the Midwest Invasive Plant Network. 


  

 

Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Gregory J. Norwood, Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Part 2: Presenter: Gregory J. Norwood, Michigan Department of Natural Resources
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Part 2: Presenter: Gregory J. Norwood, Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Part 3: Presenter: Dr. Don Uzarski, Central Michigan University
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Part 3: Presenter: Dr. Don Uzarski, Central Michigan University

Part 4: Presenter: Ryan Wheeler, Michigan Department of Natural Resources
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Part 4: Presenter: Ryan Wheeler, Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Part 5: Questions and Answers
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Part 5: Questions and Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Gregory J. Norwood, Michigan Department of Natural Resources
Part 3: Presenter: Dr. Don Uzarski, Central Michigan University
Part 4: Presenter: Ryan Wheeler, Michigan Department of Natural Resources
Part 5: Questions and Answers
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View Past Invasive Speices Webinars Here

2017
 

View a List of Invasive Speices Webinar Recordings Here


2018 ASWM Members' Webinar Series

 

Using Living ShorleinesUsing Living Shorelines Prioritization Tools for Wetland Improvements

Held December 19, 2018 at 3:00-4:30 p.m. ET



INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

ABSTRACT

Increasingly severe coastal storms and rising seas are causing coastal communities in Maine, and throughout the country, to experience loss of land along shorelines. However, not all the increases in coastal erosion are due to the effects of seawater – fresh water runoff from upland areas has important impacts as well. This webinar will present CCSWCD’s recent work to further the practice of coastal stabilization in Maine. This approach incorporates a greater emphasis on analysis of upland hydrology than has traditionally been applied to this work, in order to understand how human modification of drainage systems and coastal wetlands through coastal development affects erosion of shorelines. A key aspect of CCSWCD’s work on this subject is to promote the use of “living shorelines” for bluff stabilization over traditional “hard” approaches like concrete or riprap.

The first part of the presentation will consist of an overview of new “tools” developed by CCSWCD. The tools consist of a decision tree to walk an assessor through a repeatable process when evaluating a bluff and an in-depth plant guide that will lead landowners to plants that are best suited for each area which will differ given soil type, distance from the shore, and sun. The second part of the presentation will include application of this approach at several case study sites throughout Casco Bay in Maine. The case study locations include both estuarine and small freshwater wetlands. The presentation will conclude with an overview of the current regulatory environment and discussion of future work to promote living shoreline approaches to coastal stabilization.“

BIO

Damon Yakovleff is a Watershed Analyst for the Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District in southern Maine. Damon has his Master’s Degree in Community Planning and Development from the University of Southern Maine Muskie School, and holds an AICP (American Institute of Certified Planners) Certification and a GIS Certificate. He joined the Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District in 2014. He has worked on numerous coastal resiliency projects, including a coastal flooding vulnerability assessment and an assessment of the economic benefits of land conservation for avoidance of flood damages. Most recently, he has worked on a project to assess the potential for use of living shoreline techniques for coastal bluff stabilization in Maine. He lives in Portland, Maine.

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Damon Yakovleff, Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District, Maine

Part 2: Presenter: Damon Yakovleff, Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District, Maine
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Part 2: Presenter: Damon Yakovleff, Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District, Maine

Part 3: Questions/Answers
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Part 3: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Damon Yakovleff, Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District, Maine
Part 3: Questions/Answers
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Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level 

Held Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 3:00 p.m. ET

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This webinar began by describing the process of performing landscape-level wetland assessment for watersheds from wetland inventory and other data. Ralph Tiner shared examples from past projects he conducted with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  The webinar then shared real-world examples of this work in action, sharing how the Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission has applied this process for wetland conservation and management at the local level in Lake County, Illinois. 

BIOS

Ralph Tiner, now retired from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, is a wetland ecologist with more than 40 years of experience mapping wetlands.  Starting in 1977, he directed wetland mapping in the Northeast U.S. as part of the Service's National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). He worked for South Carolina’s Marine Resources Division, where he oversaw an inventory of the state's 500,000 acres of wetlands using remote sensing techniques in addition to evaluating impacts of construction projects in the coastal zone. As Regional Wetland Coordinator for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ralph worked principally with other federal and state agencies interested in wetland conservation and with universities and private contractors doing the actual image interpretation. While wetland mapping was the focus of these activities, he has also conducted numerous studies of wetland trends and landscape-level assessments of wetland functions.  He served as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's national expert on wetland delineation and has been actively involved in improving delineation techniques for over 20 years.

Glenn Westman and Juli Crane work for the Lake County Stormwater Management Commission as Principal Wetland Specialists. Glenn’s background is in soils, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Soil Science and Water Resources Management. Juli’s background is in vegetation, with a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife and Range Resources and a Master of Science degree in Fisheries and Wildlife.  They are both Professional Wetland Scientists and jointly have over 50 years of combined consulting and regulatory experience in wetland science and planning. 

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Ralph Tiner, US Fish & Wildlife Service (Retired)

Part 2: Presenter: Ralph Tiner, US Fish & Wildlife Service (Retired
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Part 2: Presenter: Ralph Tiner, US Fish & Wildlife Service (Retired)

Part 3: Presenters: Glenn Westman, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission and Juli Crane, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission
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Part 3: Presenters: Glenn Westman, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission and Juli Crane, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission

Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Part 4: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Ralph Tiner, US Fish & Wildlife Service (Retired
Part 3: Presenters: Glenn Westman, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission and Juli Crane, Lake County IL Stormwater Management Commission
Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Building Wetland Water Quality Monitoring Analysis Capacity Utilizing EPA’s Water Quality “eXchange” Tools and  Services

Held Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

ABSTRACT

The Water Quality eXchange (WQX) is the mechanism to publish data to the Water Quality Portal sponsored by the National Water Quality Monitoring Council. Together, WQX and the Portal allow water quality data collectors to publish data and retrieve data in a common format to be reused for additional research and decisions. Focusing on elements useful to wetland managers, this session described WQX, the WQP and highlighted the benefits of publishing data; specifically the data tools and services available once data are published.

BIO

Laura Shumway is a biologist with the US EPA in the Water Data Integration Branch. She is EPA’s liaison to the Water Quality Portal and a member of the National Water Quality Monitoring Council. She received her BS in Biology and MA in Environmental Planning & Management and Geospatial Information Systems from the University of Illinois, Springfield.

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Laura Shumway, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Part 2: Presenter: Laura Shumway, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Part 2: Presenter: Laura Shumway, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Part 3: Demonstration: Presenter: Laura Shumway U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Part 3: Demonstration: Presenter: Laura Shumway U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Laura Shumway, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Part 3: Demonstration: Presenter: Laura Shumway U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Using Avoided Land Loss as a Proxy for Reduced Storm Damages: Feasibility Study Findings for an Environmental Impact Bond in Louisiana and the Gulf

Held Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This webinar shared findings from a recent study by the Environmental Defense Fund and Quantified Ventures that found an Environmental Impact Bond for financing coastal wetland restoration in Louisiana and the Gulf to be feasible. This bond, if implemented, would incorporate payment levels based on performance – the outcome of which is avoided land loss as a proxy for reduced storm damages. The transaction has been designed to bring about partnership between the private and public sector to realize wetland restoration and storm damage reduction sooner, in order to improve resilience to coastal storms and sea level rise.

BIOS

Carolyn duPont is a Director at Quantified Ventures, leading the firm’s environmental team. In this capacity, she is working on transactions related to green infrastructure, coastal resilience, and agriculture. Prior to this role, Carolyn served on the investments team at Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, making early-stage debt and equity investments in clean energy and water companies. Previously, she worked in San Francisco as a manager for the geopolitical strategy consulting firm Monitor 360, part of the Monitor Group. In graduate school, Carolyn published research on green bonds and land conservation, as well as strategies for financing climate resilience investments. She worked with Encourage Capital on green infrastructure investments across U.S. cities and with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Carolyn serves on the board of the Trust for Public Land in Massachusetts and on the finance committee for the Conservation Law Foundation. Carolyn holds an MBA from MIT Sloan School of Management, an MPA from the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, and a BA in Anthropology from Stanford University.

Shannon Cunniff is Environmental Defense Fund’s Director, Coastal Resilience, where she is advancing use of natural infrastructure as part of multi-faceted solutions to reduce the risk of sea level rise and extreme weather events. Her efforts to enhance community capacity to undertake risk-informed planning and actions, include improving confidence in natural infrastructure function, developing incentives for restoring natural infrastructure, and expanding project financing opportunities. She applies 35 years’ experience working at the intersection of water resources, risk management, and policy to improve environmental outcomes of coastal resilience projects. She has held executive positions with the departments of Defense and Interior and worked at the U.S. EPA and Army Corps of Engineers. She is on the Board of the University of Pennsylvania Design School’s McHarg Center and the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association, where she is also a contributing editor for its journal, Shore and Beach. She holds a master’s degree in Geography and bachelor’s in Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, ASWM; Presenters: Shannon Cunniff, Environmental Defense Fund and Carolyn duPont, Quantified Ventures

Part 2: Presenters: Shannon Cunniff, Environmental Defense Fund and Carolyn duPont, Quantified Ventures
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Part 2: Presenters: Shannon Cunniff, Environmental Defense Fund and Carolyn duPont, Quantified Ventures

Part 3: Questions/Answers
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Part 3: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenters: Shannon Cunniff, Environmental Defense Fund and Carolyn duPont, Quantified Ventures
Part 3: Questions/Answers
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Navigating the Clean Water Act: A Map to the Waters of the United States
Held Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 3:00pm ET

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

• Robert Parker, Olsson Associates  [PowerPoint Presentation]

ABSTRACT

This webinar provided an introduction to the history of the Clean Water Act and the definition of “waters,” including glimpses into the thinking and motivations of several of the persons who have played pivotal roles in forming the Act into what it is today. These insights and anecdotes serve as the backdrop for a discussion of landmark litigation (SWANCC, Rapanos) and recent cases, executive orders, the Clean Water Rule, propaganda, the importance of carefully defining words, and more. The webinar concluded with an update on the latest developments in the ongoing saga of the Waters of the United States (WOTUS).

BIO

Parker, Robert is an Associate Scientist in the Environmental Practices Group at Olsson Associates in Lincoln, Nebraska, where he specializes in wetlands science, Clean Water Act Section 404 permitting and mitigation, and regulatory and policy analysis. He is the former Section 401 Coordinator at Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ). While at NDEQ Robert also coordinated the state’s Storm Water Management Plan Grants Program and served as project manager for several Watershed Management Plans in development by Nebraska Natural Resources Districts under the state's Nonpoint Source Management Plan. Before relocating to the Great Plains, Robert worked in the Great Basin region with threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout. He has a B.S. in Fisheries Biology from Humboldt State University, where he completed undergraduate research in genetic and morphologic differentiation in isolated populations of rough sculpin (Cottus asperrimus) in California’s Pit and Fall Rivers. Prior to his career in science and policy Robert spent nearly two decades working as a professional whitewater and fly fishing guide in Alaska, California, Montana, and Chile.  

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates

Part 2: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates
PlayPlay

Part 2: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates

Part 3: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates
PlayPlay

Part 3: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates

Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Part 4: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates
Part 3: Presenter: Robert Parker, Olsson Associates
Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Helping Wetland Restoration Decision-Making with EPA’s Recovery Potential Screening Tool

Held Wednesday, June 27, 2018 at 3:00pm ET

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

• Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency [PowerPoint Presentation

Sample Recovery Potential Screening Tool

ABSTRACT

Monitoring under the Clean Water Act has identified tens of thousands of polluted US water bodies that are in need of restoration. Many healthy waters without watershed protection strategies are also at risk of becoming polluted. This webinar presented the Recovery Potential Screening (RPS) Tool designed by EPA to help government and private programs compare watersheds and plan their efforts for greater likelihood of restoration and protection success. Over the past 14 years the RPS tool has assisted state water quality programs, local watershed groups, river basin managers (US and international), tribes and federal environmental agencies, with projects in over ¾ of states and territories.

BIO

Douglas Norton is a Senior Environmental Scientist at the US Environmental Protection Agency and Healthy Watersheds Coordinator for EPA’s Office of Water. For two decades, he has been leading projects to protect the nation’s rivers, streams and lakes, working with states to improve water quality and finding ways to make information available to educate and engage citizens about the condition of their local waterways.  He developed the Watershed Academy, an online EPA platform that provides web-based training and live webcasts conducted by expert instructors on a number of topics, including low-impact development, the Clean Water Act and watershed protection and management.  Norton created the EPA’s Recovery Potential Screening Tool and website, which provides a systematic approach for comparing watersheds, and the Watershed Index Online website, which offers an interactive tool and national library of 460 watershed indicators. Norton also led the creation and implementation of a mobile-friendly website called, “How’s My Waterway” that provides public access to data on the condition of thousands of waterways and their ongoing restoration activities across the US. 

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst ASWM
Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency

Part 2: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency
PlayPlay

Part 2: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency

Part 3: Screening Tool: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency
PlayPlay

Part 3: Screening Tool: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency

Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Part 4: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency
Part 3: Screening Tool: Presenter: Douglas Norton, Senior Environmental Scientist, US Environmental Protection Agency
Part 4: Questions/Answers
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What Stream and Wetland Restoration and Protection Projects would You Fund with $165 million?

How Ohio EPA Generated Funds to Address the Loss of Ecological Function and Biological Diversity Threatening the State’s Water Quality

Held Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EST

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency [POWERPOINT Presentation]

ABSTRACT

Ohio EPA established the Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP) in 2000 to help address the loss of ecological function and biological diversity threatening water quality in Ohio. WRRSP funds specifically target the protection and restoration of the highest quality aquatic habitats and biological communities. WRRSP funds are generated by advancing the interest to be paid on loans awarded through Ohio’s wastewater State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program that is administered by Ohio EPA’s Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance (DEFA).

The SRF loan program provides below-market rate financing to Ohio municipalities for the planning, design and construction of wastewater infrastructure projects. Participating SRF loan recipients voluntarily agree to “sponsor” a WRRSP project as part of their loan by entering into a formal sponsorship agreement with the WRRSP project implementer. As of October 2016, the WRRSP program has awarded $165 million in funding for 128 projects. The WRRSP has successfully protected 4,500 acres of wetlands and 399,225 linear feet of streams. The WRRSP has also removed 12 dams and restored 703 acres of wetlands and 119,539 linear feet of streams.

This webinar will present an overview of DEFA’s Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP) including program administration, technical criteria, and summarize the success of the program.

Note: To qualify for WRRSP funding, a project must either by itself, or in concert with other past, present or future projects, result in the full protection or restoration of the targeted aquatic resources. Streams must either be in attainment of or be fully restored to at least the warmwater habitat (WWH) aquatic life use. Wetlands must achieve or be restored to a Category 3 designation. Eligible projects include stream and wetland protection through fee-simple property acquisition, and stream and wetland restoration projects that correct impairments to those resources. Typical stream restoration projects include, but are not limited to, dam removals, stream restoration using natural channel design and riparian zone revegetation. Similarly, wetland restoration projects include, but are not limited to, invasive species control, restoration of hydrology by breakage of drain tiles and other rehabilitation efforts.

BIO

Tom Harcarik is an environmental planner with Ohio EPA’s Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance where he evaluates stream and wetland protection and restoration projects under the innovative Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program. Tom also assists communities by reviewing potential environmental impacts to streams and wetlands, threatened and endangered species, historic properties, floodplains and other environmental resources that may result from projects seeking financing through Ohio’s wastewater and water State Revolving Fund programs. Tom has worked for Ohio EPA for over 32 years, including 18 years in the 401 Water Quality Certification program and Wetland Ecology Group. Tom has co-authorized several Ohio EPA reports describing how wetlands may be integrated into the TMDL process and be used to reduce nutrient loadings into streams and lakes. Additionally, Tom represented Ohio EPA in civil enforcement matters and served as the technical liaison to the Attorney General’s Office for Ohio EPA’s solid waste and unregulated hazardous waste programs. Tom received a B.S. in Conservation, with a focus on aquatic ecology, from Kent State University and completed course work in Environmental and Public Policy at the Ohio State University. Tom currently serves as the Vice-Chair of the ASWM Board of Directors.  

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

Part 2: Presenter: Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency
PlayPlay

Part 2: Presenter: Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

Part 3: Questions/Answers
PlayPlay

Part 3: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency
Part 3: Questions/Answers
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Mapping tidal wetlands and their losses on the U.S. West Coast: New methods, new insights

Held January 31, 2018 - 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. EST

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [PowerPoint Presentation]

PRESENTER

Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA  [PowerPoint Presentation]

ABSTRACT

Co-investigators: Correigh Greene1, Van Hare2, Brett Holycross2, Andy Lanier3, Hiroo Imaki1, Tanya Haddad3, Randy Dana3, Walter Heady4, Kevin O'Connor5

How can we be more effective in our work to conserve and restore estuarine wetlands on the U.S. West Coast, both under current conditions and projected future sea level rise? The first step is to make sure we have accurately mapped the historical and current extent of estuarine wetlands. Existing comprehensive tidal wetland mapping (the National Wetland Inventory) has limitations for these purposes: it does not explicitly map former tidal wetlands (which represent restoration opportunities), nor does it use water level models or high-resolution elevation data (e.g. LIDAR) to accurately identify areas within tide range. Therefore, our team, coordinated through the Pacific Marine and Estuarine Fish Habitat Partnership (PMEP), recently generated new maps of current and historical tidal wetlands for the entire contiguous U.S. West Coast (Washington, Oregon, and California). The new maps use LIDAR digital elevation models (DEMs) and NOAA water level models to establish the maximum extent of tidal wetlands, and they represent a major step forward in accuracy and utility for restoration planning and analysis of wetland loss and conversion. The maps include former tidal wetlands within current tide range (such as diked lands), which represent restoration opportunities. Using this new mapping, total current and historical tidal wetland area for the West Coast is approximately 360,000 to 370,000 hectares. Building from this new base, our team developed an indirect method for mapping tidal wetland losses, and created maps of these losses for 55 estuaries on the West Coast; these 55 estuaries represent about 98% of historical West Coast tidal wetland area. Based on this assessment, about 85% of tidal wetlands have been lost from West Coast estuaries; losses were highest for major river delta systems. The new maps will help interested groups develop improved action plans for estuarine wetland habitat restoration and conservation, and will also provide a base for understanding and predicting future changes with projected sea level rise.

Co-investigator affiliations:
1 NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA
2 Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR
3 Oregon Coastal Management Program, Dept. of Land Conservation and Development, Salem, OR
4 The Nature Conservancy
5 Moss Landing Marine Labs

BIO

Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis, Oregon. She provides leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation priorities in the Pacific Northwest. Her current work focuses on West Coast estuarine habitat mapping and prioritization; analysis of climate change threats and strategic planning for sustainability of Pacific Northwest wetland ecosystems; and effectiveness monitoring at Oregon's largest tidal wetland restoration projects

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology

Part 2: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA
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Part 2: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

Part 3: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA
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Part 3: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Part 4: Questions/Answers

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Policy Analyst Association of State Wetland Managers
Part 2: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA
Part 3: Presenter: Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA
Part 4: Questions/Answers
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Certificate of Participation for the May 27, 2020 ASWM Members’ Webinar

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the May 27, 2020 ASWM Members’ Webinar: An Introduction to the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act: Understanding Its Relationship with Wetlands

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM webinar “An Introduction to the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act: Understanding Its Relationship with Wetlands” on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

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  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation for WMC Webinar - 120820

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the December 8, 2020 Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar: Mapping a Path to Wetland Functions: Leveraging NHD and LLWW to Enhance the National Wetland Inventory

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: "Mapping a Path to Wetland Functions: Leveraging NHD and LLWW to Enhance the National Wetland Inventory” on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    ASWM Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation Members' Webinar January 27, 2021

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the January 27, 2021 ASWM Members’ Webinar: Using Drone Technology to Support Wetland Work

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Members' webinar: “Using Drone Technology to Support Wetland Work” on Wednesday, January 27, 2021 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:Non-Member Certificate

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation for the February 20, 2020 ASWM Compensatory Mitigation Webinar 9

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the February 20, ASWM Compensatory Mitigation Webinar 9: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: How interests in property may affect mitigation projects

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Compensatory Mitigation webinar 9: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: How interests in property may affect mitigation projects on Thursday, February 20, 2020 from 2:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.