Certificate of Participation for the Assumption Webinar - March 16, 2021

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the March 16, 2021 ASWM Section 404 Assumption Webinar “Findings from ASWM’s Multi-Year Clean Water Act Section 404 Assumption Project”

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Section 404 Assumption Webinar “Findings from ASWM’s Multi-Year Clean Water Act Section 404 Assumption Project” on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

Non-Member CertificateA) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

2017 Clean Water Act Webinars

What's Next for Clean Water Act Jurisdiction

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 12:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

  • Jan Goldman-Carter, National Wildlife Federation
  • Virginia Albrecht, Hunton and Williams, LLP
  • Royal C. Gardner, Stetson University, College of Law [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Army (Army) are carrying out a two-step process to revise Clean Water Act Jurisdiction. The first step is to repeal the Clean Water Rule regulation finalized by EPA and the Army in the spring of 2015 and replace it with the 1986 rule previously in place in conjunction with the Rapanos guidance. Essentially this step formally adopts the current status quo which remains in place because the Clean Water Rule is stayed by the Sixth Circuit Court pending action by the court. The next step following the repeal and replace rulemaking will be a new rule based in part on the Scalia Opinion in the Rapanos decision.

As states, tribes, and others review the proposed rule and think about the rulemaking that is planned to follow it, there are many issues to consider. ASWM has invited legal experts representing diverse perspectives to share their insights to help webinar participants to understand the current process, issues of importance, and potential outcomes as these rulemaking efforts are carried out and later challenged in the courts.

BIOS

Virginia S. Albrecht is Special Counsel for Hunton and Williams.  Her practice focuses exclusively on environmental law and administrative law --- in particular, the Clean Water Act (CWA) wetlands program, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and other federal regulatory programs that affect the use of land. She has experience in permit negotiation, litigation of policy issues, lobbying Congress and the Administration, enforcement defense, and compliance counseling. Representative clients include development companies, agricultural and mining companies, state and local agencies, and trade associations. She has extensive experience with federal environmental agencies both in Washington and in district and regional offices. Virginia is a member of the assumable waters subcommittee which EPA established in 2015 to obtain advice on the scope of waters that can be assumed and Administered by states under section 404 of the clean water act.  She is also an adjunct professor for the University of Miami School of Law Program in Real Property Development.  She received her JD from Vanderbilt University Law School, was Articles Editor of the Vanderbilt Law Review in1981, and received her MA in Communications from the University of Pennsylvania in 1970 and her BS from the University of Wisconsin in 1964.  She has bar admissions in the District of Columbia.

Jan Goldman-Carter is Director, Wetlands and Water Resources for the National Wildlife Federation. She manages the NWF campaign to restore Clean Water Act protections and works to strengthen wetland and watershed protections regionally and nationally. Jan has lectured and written extensively on Clean Water Act and wetlands laws and programs since 1987. She received the EPA-ELI National Wetlands Award in 1993. Jan served as a wetlands specialist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. She grew up on the edge of the "River of Grass" - the Everglades - and enjoys canoeing, kayaking, birding and otherwise being in and on the water. She received her B.A. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Williams College, Massachusetts, her M.S. in Natural Resources from the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources, and her law degree from the University of Minnesota.

Royal C. Gardner is Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law. He is an internationally recognized expert in wetland law and policy. Recent projects include advising the Government of Oman regarding wetland policy, coauthoring a U.S. Supreme Court amicus brief on behalf of environmental scientists, and creating an interdisciplinary course that facilitates discourse among experienced scientists, policymakers, and students.

His research and scholarship focus on U.S. and international wetland legal and policy issues, with an emphasis on biodiversity offsets. He has lectured in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America.

Professor Gardner is the current chair of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP) for the Ramsar Convention, an intergovernmental wetland treaty with 168 countries. He also served on the Ramsar STRP as North American representative (2006–2008) and invited expert (2009–2012). He was chair of the U.S. National Ramsar Committee (2005–2008) and participated in the Ramsar Convention Conferences of the Parties held in Spain (2002), Uganda (2005), Korea (2008), and Romania (2012). In 2006, he won the National Wetlands Award for Education and Outreach. In 1999–2001, Professor Gardner was appointed to the National Research Council’s Committee on Mitigating Wetland Losses.

An executive editor of the Boston College Law Review and a member of the Order of the Coif, he graduated magna cum laude from Boston College Law School. He then clerked for Chief Judge Francis J. Boyle of the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island. From 1989 to 1993, he served in the Army General Counsel’s office as the Department of the Army’s principal wetland attorney, advising the assistant secretary of the Army (civil works) on legal and policy issues related to the Corps of Engineers’ administration of the Clean Water Act section 404 program. From 1993 until he joined the Stetson faculty in 1994, Professor Gardner worked for the Department of Defense, where he participated in negotiating international agreements with Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Belarus to facilitate the dismantlement of the former Soviet Union’s nuclear weapons.

Since joining the Stetson faculty, Professor Gardner has twice received Stetson University’s Homer and Dolly Hand Award for Excellence in Faculty Scholarship and has been voted the Outstanding Professor by the Stetson student body. He has taught at Stetson’s summer programs in Spain, Germany, Argentina, and Estonia, and has been a visiting professor at the Universidad de Málaga (Spain) and Concordia International University-Estonia, where he received the Outstanding Instructor Award. At Stetson, Professor Gardner has served as director of graduate and international programs, associate dean, vice dean, and interim dean. 

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Royal C. Gardner, Stetson University, College of Law

Play

Part 2: Presenter: Royal C. Gardner, Stetson University, College of Law

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The presentations for Jan Goldman-Carter and Virginia Albrecht are not available for viewing. 



Recorded Webinar: 2017 Annual State/Tribal/Federal Coordination Meeting


What's Next for Clean Water Act Jurisdiction:

Maintaining - or Draining - the Swamps? The Future of the Clean Water Rule

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 

INTRODUCTION

Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers 

ABSTRACT

In the spring of 2017 the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers are implementing Executive Order 13778 on Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and the Economic Growth by Reviewing the Waters of the United States” Rule which directs the federal agencies to rescind the current Clean Water Rule and replace it.  This recorded webinar by Stephen Samuels, retired, formerly with Department of Justice, provides information about the status of the currently stayed Clean Water Rule and the case that has been accepted to be heard in 2018 before the Supreme Court, as well as a succinct overview of  Supreme  Court decisions addressing Clean Water Act jurisdiction in recent decades through the present day.  

PRESENTER

BIO

Now retired, Stephen Samuels was previously Assistant Chief of the Environmental Defense Section of the Environment & Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.  In that capacity, Mr. Samuels supervised a staff of 15 attorneys handling federal district court litigation involving all the major environmental pollution statutes.  Mr. Samuels has 31 years of experience enforcing and defending the Clean Water Act Section 404 regulatory program.  During that time, he helped lead the federal government’s litigation responses to the Supreme Court's decisions in SWANCC, Rapanos, Sackett and Hawkes.  Until his retirement in January 2017, Mr. Samuels headed the DOJ litigation team that defended challenges to the Clean Water Rule.  Mr. Samuels is a frequent speaker on Clean Water Act jurisdiction at conferences around the country.  Mr. Samuels previously was an attorney with the U.S. Department of Energy and with the law firm of Breed, Abbott & Morgan.  Mr. Samuels earned his J.D. in 1977 from Stanford Law School and his B.A. in 1974 from Tulane University.

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Stephen Samuels, Retired, formerly with Department of Justice

Play

Part 2: Presenter: Stephen Samuels, Retired, formerly with Department of Justice

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View Past Clean Water Act Webinars Here

2020     2019     2018     2015
                   

View a List of Past Clean Water Act Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Clean Water Act Webinars Here

Certificate of Participation for Section 404 Assumption Webinar - September 23 2020

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the September 23, 2020 ASWM Section 404 Assumption Project Webinar Series: Mitigation Banking Considerations for States and Tribes Exploring Assumption of the CWA Section 404 Program

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Section 404 Assumption Project Webinar Series: Mitigation Banking Considerations for States and Tribes Exploring Assumption of the CWA Section 404 Program on Wednesday, September 23, 2020 from 3:00-5:00 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation Mapping Webinar October 7, 2020

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the October 7, 2020 Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar: Automating the Detection of Disturbances to Aquatic Resources

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: "Automating the Detection of Disturbances to Aquatic Resources” on Wednesday, October 7, 2020 from 3:00-4:00 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation for the January 29, 2020 ASWM Members’ Webinar

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the January 29, 2020 ASWM Members’ Webinar: “In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States”

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Members’ webinar ”In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States” on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 from 3-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation EPA Region 10 Webinar - 120120

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the December 1, 2020 ASWM EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Programs Webinar Series: Advancing Tribal Wetland Programs Through Innovations in Monitoring & Assessment

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Programs Webinar Series: “Advancing Tribal Wetland Programs Through Innovations in Monitoring & Assessment” on Friday, December 1, 2020 from 1:00-2:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:Non-Member Certificate

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

2019 ACOE Compensatory Mitigation Training Webinars

Webinar 8: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Oversight and Compliance

Held Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 2:00pm – 4:30pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

Kristina Hall
Oversight and compliance is an important component of compensatory mitigation. This presentation will discuss oversight and compliance from the perspective of a Corps Regulator as well as important “touch points” in mitigation plan review, approval, implementation, monitoring and long term management. Examples of effective adjustment of anticipated outcomes will be given and along with flexibility in the Regulatory’s oversight of the compensatory mitigation process.

Sarah Woodford
Oversight and compliance are essential components of any functional regulatory program. This presentation discusses oversight tools that are used in Virginia in the regulation of mitigation banks and in-lieu fee programs. In addition, through several case studies, the presentation will provide a state perspective of the communication and resolutions that developed when non-compliance or other issues were identified.

Ashley Zavagno
Oversight and compliance challenges in compensatory mitigation are different for project sponsors and consultants than for regulators. This presentation will explore challenges faced by project sponsors and consultants during the development, implementation, monitoring, and long-term management stages of mitigation projects and offer potential solutions and best management practices. Such challenges include implementing complex performance standards for multiple agencies, finding appropriate easement and endowment holders, disparity in endowment requirements across projects, coordinating decisions with multiple parties during implementation, and lack of collaboration between agencies and project proponents during project development.

BIOS

Kristi HallKristi Hall, Professional Wetland Scientist, is currently the USACE Regulatory Headquarters Science Detailee. When not on detail assignment, she is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the Vicksburg District Regulatory Branch, Evaluation Section. At the District, Kristi primarily focuses on mitigation banking and standard permitting. Kristi has worked in the Regulatory field since 2003 and has been with the Vicksburg District since 2015. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Virginia Tech and her master’s degree in fisheries and wildlife biology from Colorado State University. Kristi has worked in both the public and private sectors with the Mississippi Department of Transportation, USACE ERDC Environmental Lab, as well as several private consulting firms prior to working with USACE Regulatory. Kristi served as Acting Technical Services Branch Chief in the Nashville District in 2017 and was named the 2018 Vicksburg District Regulator of the Year. In her “free time” she can be found shuttling her two kids to their numerous athletic endeavors, and working with her husband to build their own home in Vicksburg.

Sarah Woodford Sarah Woodford is the Compensatory Mitigation Specialist for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. She is the state chair of the Interagency Review Team for all non-tidal wetland and stream mitigation banks and in-lieu fee programs in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Norfolk District, and ensures that mitigation sponsors adhere to State Water Control Law and Virginia Water Protection Permit Program regulations. Sarah works closely with the Corps and the Virginia Marine Resources Commission IRT chairs, along with other member agencies of the IRT, to reach consensus on complex issues in compensatory mitigation. She also assists permit managers, mitigation sponsors, consultants, and the regulated public in understanding the mitigation process. Prior to DEQ, Sarah worked as an environmental consultant, where she focused on water quality monitoring and stream mitigation assessment, restoration design, and post-construction performance monitoring.

Ashley Zavagno Ashley Zavagno is a Restoration Ecologist and Project Manager at WRA, Inc., a private environmental consulting firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She received her Bachelor of Science in Ecology and Evolution from U.C. Santa Barbara and her Master of Environmental Science and Management with a specialization in conservation planning from the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. She is also a Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner through the Society of Ecological Restoration and a Certified Ecologist through the Ecological Society of America. For the past several years, she has been overseeing the entitlement, permitting, implementation, monitoring, and long-term management of various mitigation banks and large-scale permittee-responsible mitigation projects throughout California. She has worked in various western landscapes including tidal wetlands, vernal pools, chaparral, coniferous forests, and oak woodlands, but her passion is rivers and salmonids. 

 

Play

Part 8A: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers

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Part 8B: Presenter: Kristina Hall, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 8C: Presenter: Sarah Woodford, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

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Part 8D: Ashely Zavagno, CA WRA, Inc.

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Part 8E: Questions/Answers

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Webinar 7: An Ecological Framework for Compensatory Mitigation: Anticipating the Unexpected

Held Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 2:00pm – 4:30pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

W. Lee Daniels 
Compaction of created wetland subsoils is often required for stability and to limit groundwater losses, but failure to provide a suitably loosened surface soil rooting media is a common problem, particularly for deeper rooted forested wetlands. Remedies include managing soil placement and tillage operations in concert with seasonal/moisture constraints. Near-surface compaction can also drastically alter hydroperiod regimes away from intended target references. Deeper excavations of creation sites in the mid-Atlantic USA also commonly encounter potential acid-sulfate materials, which if allowed to oxidize, generate very low soil+water pH and phytotoxic conditions. Preconstruction testing, recognition and avoidance are critical; remedial measures include heavy liming and organic amendments and/or keeping these materials saturated year-round.

Shawn Chartrand
Wetland and fluvial restoration projects commonly include post-construction plans which detail actions to address issues related to routine maintenance, adaptive management and remediation. These three direct actions have one common goal: set the constructed project on a trajectory to realize the restoration objectives. In this webinar they reviewed these three direct actions, with an emphasis on (1) how the direct actions are typically differentiated during the pre-construction planning and design phase, (2) post-construction conditions that are difficult to anticipate and therefore plan around, and (3) strategies that can be used to address significant uncertainties involving future landscape conditions. They reviewed the San Clemente Dam Removal project to help illustrate routine maintenance, adaptive management and remediation, within the context of an action that will reset the Carmel River corridor to a new physical state.

Krystel Bell
This presentation provided an understanding of the Corps' perspective in review, approval, and oversight of mitigation projects where adaptive management has been used as an important tool for planning and response to challenges and unforeseen changes to those projects.

BIOS

W. Lee Daniels W. Lee Daniels is the Thomas B. Hutcheson Professor of Environmental Soil Science at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in Soil Science from VPI & SU in 1985. Dr. Daniels areas of specialization include stabilization and restoration of disturbed lands including areas disturbed by mining, road building, waste disposal, urbanization and erosion. In particular, he has focused his research and consulting experience in wetland impact mitigation, mine reclamation, and soil-waste management systems. His teaching programs at Virginia Tech focus on soil geomorphology and landscape analysis with particular emphasis on the relationships among surficial geology, hydrology, soil patterns and long term landscape evolution processes. Major awards include the Reclamation Researcher of the Year by the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation (ASMR) in 1993, USEPA’s National Biosolids Utilization Research Award in 2000 and the Lifetime Achievement in Research Award by ASMR in 2012.

Shawn Chartrand Shawn Chartrand completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia, and he is presently a postdoctoral research fellow at Vanderbilt University. Shawn is interested in how mountain streams form and evolve due to changes in local to watershed scale conditions. He uses laboratory experiments, develops theory, numerical models as well as field-based programs to pursue his interests, and develop strategies to assist practitioners working on applied problems. He has worked professionally for Balance Hydrologics since 2000, during which time he built and continues to lead a river and wetland restoration program. His notable applied experience includes 8 years of work on the San Clemente Dam Removal project, Carmel River, CA, and 15 years of work using climate change projections to plan water supply and instream flows for salmonids with the City of Santa Cruz and other regional Cities.

Krystel Bell Krystel Bell recently became Regulatory Program Manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Washington, D.C. Prior to this, she served as Mitigation Banking Specialist for the Sacramento District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers where she chaired the Interagency Review Team for multiple mitigation banks and in-lieu fee programs and worked on several of the District’s most complex regulatory actions. Prior to working for the Sacramento District, Ms. Bell worked as an environmental consultant and acted as a local representative for a County‐ level environmental program. Ms. Bell has extensive knowledge of how Regulatory decisions can affect developers, conservationists, and the general public. Her ability to communicate effectively with applicants, the public, federal, state and local agencies, and peers in the regulatory community has led to productive collaborative approaches in resolution of complex regulatory issues.


Play

Part 7A: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers

Play

Part 7B: Presenter: W. Lee Daniels, Thomas B. Hutcheson Professor of Environmental Soil Science, Virginia Tech

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Part 7C: Presenter: Shawn Chartrand, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Vanderbilt University

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Part 7D: Krystel Bell, Regulatory Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 7E: Questions/Answers

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Webinar 6: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: From Conceptual to Final Design
Held Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 2:00 p.m. ET

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

  • Matt Gause, Ecological Resources & Land Stewardship Director, Westervelt Ecological Services 
    [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Larry Urban, Wetland Mitigation Specialist, Montana Department of Transportation 
    [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

  • Jeanne Richardson, Mitigation Subject Matter Expert, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District Regulatory Branch 
    [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABSTRACTS

Matt Gause 
Wetland Mitigation Concept to Final Design – Where Dreams and Reality Collide
The value of good data on both biotic and abiotic elements was emphasized in earlier webinars in this series. Good biotic and abiotic data also forms the foundation of the mitigation conceptual design; however, all the data necessary to finalize the design is often not yet available when a conceptual mitigation plan is first presented to regulatory agency staff. Using selected case studies this webinar identified general best practices for evaluating conceptual designs, illustrate how designs become more refined as new information comes to light and how to best remain engaged in the design process while working towards a final, implementable design.

Larry Urban
Three Phases of Design in Compensatory Mitigation Projects
Mitigation projects generally follow a three-phased approach to design prior to construction and implementation on the ground. These phases consist of Conceptual, Preliminary, and Final Design efforts. The Conceptual phase focuses on developing a series of Concepts / Options and then determining the feasibility of developing a mitigation project. These initial conceptual phases are important in provides an opportunity for cooperative agency review and input towards the selection of an approved “Preferred” concept. However, that “Preferred” concept may or may not move forward into more detailed design based upon cost/benefit analysis. Preliminary Design phase is where the details of a “Preferred” concept selected evolves thru a design process towards the development of construction plans. It involves agency review that may involve revisions to the details of the “Preferred” design as it moves forward towards construction. The Final Design is essentially that, to finalize the construction plans and specifications of a mitigation project for construction efforts. The Final Design involves agency review of the details of the project but does not involve major changes to the design that would delay construction or prevent implementation of the project. At this stage of a project, input is usually associated with the approval of permits and provide permit conditions for the project during construction and upon completion. This presentation provided some examples of the different phases for different types of projects that may be undertaken.

Jeanne Richardson 
Mitigation Work Plans: A Regulators Perspective
Jeanne C. Richardson outlined the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Norfolk District review and approval process for Mitigation Work Plans submitted by providers of wetland and stream compensatory mitigation projects from conceptual to final design. The presentation focused on the District regulators perspective of what information is necessary, when is that information necessary, and the level of detail required at each submittal milestone for review and approval. Jeanne walked through some specific examples that will serve to demonstrate some lessons learned and how the District’s requirements have changed over the years.


BIOS

Matt Gause, Ecological Resources & Land Stewardship Director, Westervelt Ecological ServicesMatt Gause is the Ecological Resources & Land Stewardship Director at Westervelt Ecological Services and oversees Westervelt’s land stewardship and ecological resources on over 8,000 acres of restored wetlands and endangered species habitat on 18,000 acres of preserved properties in California, the Rocky Mountain region and southeastern United States. Mr Gause has over 25 years of experience with wetland restoration including the restoration of vernal pools, riparian forest, tidal marsh, and floodplain wetlands. He has also managed conserved lands for more than 15 threatened or endangered species on preserves throughout California.

In addition, Mr. Gause provides site suitability analyses during the land acquisition process, including restoration suitability, threatened and endangered species, easement restriction analysis, and future land management cost estimation. Mr. Gause also develops and implements both baseline and long-term land management and monitoring strategies for mitigation and conservation landscapes.

Mr. Gause is a Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) and received a Bachelor of Science in Botany from the University of California at Davis.

Matt Gause, Ecological Resources & Land Stewardship Director, Westervelt Ecological ServicesLawrence J. “Larry” Urban is the wetland mitigation specialist for the Montana Department of Transportation with state-wide responsibilities based out of Helena, Montana. He has over 30 years of experience in wetland delineations, functional assessments, monitoring and mitigation site development for both the New Jersey and Montana Department of Transportations. He has been involved in the development of a comprehensive aquatic resource mitigation program to meet wetland and stream mitigation needs for transportation projects throughout the state of Montana that has created over 55 mitigation areas ranging in size from ½ to 300 acres in size. He developed MDT’s annual mitigation monitoring programs for the purposes of managing MDT aquatic resource mitigation sites on private, state and tribal lands to comply with federal, state and tribal permitting requirements.

He has presented at National and Regional wetland mitigation conferences, and participates in annual continuing education, undergraduate and graduate courses as an instructor in wetland regulations, endangered plant species, functional assessments, mitigation monitoring, and aquatic resource restoration here in the state of Montana.

He was the recipient of the 2017 Montana Wetland Stewardship Award for his untiring efforts to protect, preserve and restore Montana’s wetland ecosystems. In his spare time, he is a fly-fishing guru working part-time at CrossCurrents Fly shop in Helena, Montana for his addiction to fly-fishing and fly-tying. He is also an avid birder that loves his day job at MDT as it affords him opportunities to see all kinds of birds and travel across the vast expanses of Montana.

Jeanne Richardson, Mitigation Subject Matter Expert, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District Regulatory Branch

Jeanne C. Richardson is the Mitigation Subject Matter Expert for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District Regulatory Branch. She has worked for the Corps of Engineers for over 15 years. Jeanne oversees the District’s compensatory mitigation program where she develops and implements District level policy, standard operating procedures, templates, and technical guidance related to compensatory mitigation. Jeanne organizes training and provides assistance for District staff, 3rd party mitigation providers, and others specific to those policies, procedures, templates, and guidance. Jeanne manages the Virginia Aquatic Resources Trust Fund (VARTF) for the District. VARTF currently has currently has approximately 109 approved and pending projects. Jeanne provides the primary oversight of the District’s Interagency Review Team.

 

 

 

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Part 6A: Introduction: Dawn Smith, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Matt Gause, Westervelt Ecological Services

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Part 6B: Presenter: Larry Urban, Wetland Mitigation Specialist, Montana Department of Transportation

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Part 6C: Presenter: Jeanne Richardson, Mitigation Subject Matter Expert, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District Regulatory Branch

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Part 6D: Questions/Answers

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Webinar 5: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Coherent Plans – Goals, Objectives, Performance Standards, Outcomes and Monitoring
Held Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 2:00 p.m. ET

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

  • Eric Stein, Principal Scientist, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Mick Micacchion, Professional Wetland Scientist and Restoration Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Anthony Zemba, Environmental Specialist, Certified Ecologist/Soil Scientist, Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABSTRACTS

Eric Stein
Performance standards are the roadmap to successful wetland restoration and mitigation. The likelihood of success increases dramatically when well-designed, ecologically relevant performance standards are used. This talk outlined key considerations for constructing effective performance standards that account for a broad set of physical, hydrological, and biological functions. We also covered practical considerations such alternative ways to approach “reference”, timing of when different standards should be met, and ways to develop standards that are resilient to changing conditions over time. Finally, we considered critical data management approaches that can improve accessibility of monitoring data necessary to evaluate standards over time.

Mick Micacchion 
A condition-based approach to assessing functional replacement for wetland mitigation was developed using a reference wetland data set of natural wetlands that includes data from the major Ohio wetland types that span a gradient of human disturbance. From this data set wetland program tools were developed: 1) multimetric biological indices (IBIs) and hydrological and biogeochemical indicators; 2) a rapid (condition based) wetland assessment tool (ORAM); and 3) a wetland classification scheme based on landscape position and dominant vegetation. Ensuring functional replacement occurs in a several step process:

  • First, as part of permit application, the HGM class and dominant plant community of the impacted wetland(s) are determined. This determination accounts for the ecosystem processes (functions) and ecological services (values) of different wetland types without the necessity of developing a comprehensive list of those functions and values;
  • Second, the condition of the impacted wetland is assessed with the rapid condition tool (ORAM v. 5.0) or a wetland IBI providing a measure of "functional capacity";
  • Third, the size of the wetland to be impacted is determined and appropriate mitigation ratios are applied;
  • Fourth, any residual moderate to high functions or values the impacted wetland(s) may still be providing, despite moderate to severe degradation, are evaluated using checklist with a narrative discussion; and,
  • Finally, requirements for mitigation are specified in the permit.

Fundamentally, the above approach is strongly data-driven, and it follows then that meaningful and adequate mitigation monitoring is absolutely necessary to determine whether the mitigation wetland has "succeeded" or "failed."

Anthony Zemba 
Tiering may be an often overlooked but very useful approach to mitigation design and implementation. There are lots of information to be gained from the biology of early successional and volunteer species. Too often in the past, too much focus has been on getting plants in the ground and the subsequent survivorship metric of the planted specimens. Poor survivorship may be a result of poor microhabitat selection, poor choice of plants for site-specific conditions, or a result of overlooking other ecological factors and processes. Anthony provided an overview of some case studies of how some restoration sites here in the east have failed and why, and how tiering, more attention to site-specific attributes, and the consideration of other ecological factors in the mitigation planning process may help to improve success of a mitigation site.

BIO

Eric D. Stein, D.Env. is a Principal Scientist at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP), where he is head of the Biology Department. Dr. Stein oversees a variety of projects related to in-stream and coastal water quality, bioassessment, hydromodification, watershed modeling, and assessment of wetlands and other aquatic resources. His research focuses on effects of human activities on the condition of aquatic ecosystems, and on developing tools to better assess and manage those effects. Dr. Stein has authored over 100 journal articles and technical reports and participates on numerous technical workgroups and committees related to water quality and wetland assessment and management. Prior to joining SCCWRP in 2002, Dr. Stein spent six years as a Senior Project Manager with the Regulatory Branch of the Los Angeles District Corps of Engineers, and four years with a private consulting firm.

Mick MicacchionMick Micacchion is a Professional Wetland Scientist and works as a restoration ecologist with The Nature Conservancy for the Ohio In-Lieu-Fee Compensatory Mitigation Program. He has a BS and MS in Wildlife Management, both from Ohio State University. Mick retired in 2011 from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) with 32 years of state service including 10 years with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. While working for 20 years at Ohio EPA he was instrumental in the development of Ohio’s Wetland Water Quality Standards rules, wetland assessment tools, including the Ohio Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (ORAM), Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity (VIBI), Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity (AmphIBI), “Standardized Monitoring Protocols and Performance Standards for Ohio Mitigation Wetlands” and their integration into Ohio’s wetland program, which has worked as a model for the country.

Mick also works for the non-profit Midwest Biodiversity Institute (MBI) where he has served as a wetland ecologist for the past seven years. Currently he instructs courses in Wetland Botany, Wetland Delineation, Ohio Amphibians, Ohio Wetland Assessment Methods, including ORAM, VIBI/VIBI-FQ, and AmphIBI, as well as several other courses at MBI. He has monitored the physical, chemical and biological features, including the soils, hydrology, chemistry, plant, amphibian and macroinvertebrate communities of hundreds of Ohio’s natural wetlands and trained hundreds of wetland professionals in the development and use of wetland monitoring and assessment methods, including ORAM, VIBI and AmphIBI. He has also monitored, assessed, and reported on the condition of hundreds of Ohio compensatory wetland mitigation projects and spent more than a decade on Ohio’s Interagency Review Team, where he was a major contributor to the “Guidelines on Wetland Mitigation Banking in Ohio.” Mick was a member of the Technical Advisory Group, which developed the methods used in the National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA), and lead crews and managed others for both the 2011 and 2016 NWCAs sampling wetlands in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kentucky, Tennessee, and 10 other states.

He is the Vice President of the Ohio Wetlands Association and was a founder and has been active with the Ohio Vernal Pool Network since 2004.

Anthony Zemba is a certified ecologist, certified soil scientist, and certified hazardous materials manager. He has over 30 years of experience in natural resource management that includes aquatic toxicology, analytical chemistry, wetland assessment and delineation, ecological risk assessment, habitat assessments, conservation biology and ecological restoration. Mr. Zemba also serves as an adjunct professor at the University of New Haven Graduate Program in Environmental Science where he teaches a course in Environmental Impact Reports and Assessment. His love of nature blurs the line between work and play and on any given day, he may be found half-submerged in a swamp, scampering over boulder talus, or striding through forest and field alike with binoculars, insect net, hand lens, camera, or all of the above in tow searching for the next subject of study. 

 

 

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Part 5A: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Eric Stein, Principal Scientist, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project

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Part 5B: Presenter: Mick Micacchion, Professional Wetland Scientist and Restoration Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy

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Part 5C: Presenter: Anthony Zemba, Environmental Specialist, Certified Ecologist/Soil Scientist, Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc.

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Part 5D: Questions/Answers

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Webinar 4: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review
 
Held Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 2:00 p.m. ET

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

  • Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Michelle Mattson, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Michael S. Rolband, P.E., P.W.S., P.W.D., Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • Karen Greene, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABSTRACT

Over the past three decades compensatory mitigation has become an important strategy for addressing the adverse environmental impacts that result from dredge and fill activities. Compensatory mitigation projects should be designed to replace lost ecological services at an alternative location by either the permitee or a third party in a mitigation bank or in-lieu fee program.  Federal and State regulatory and resource agency staff routinely review these proposals to ensure that projects will achieve the desired outcomes. But what exactly should compensatory mitigation project reviewers consider in evaluating a proposal? The purpose of this webinar was to help plan reviewers evaluate whether a project as proposed is likely to achieve its objectives by examining some of the most important aspects of a project. Examples (including both successful and less than successful projects) from riverine, palustrine freshwater and coastal projects was provided to highlight the importance of site selection, water budgets, soils, monitoring, adaptation, and resiliency in evaluating a restoration plan.

BIOS

Steve MartinSteve Martin is an Environmental Scientist with the U.S. Army Corfps of Engineers’ Institute for Water Resources (IWR). His focus is on compensatory mitigation, including third party compensatory mitigation (mitigation banks and in-lieu fee programs). He provides technical and policy support to HQ USACE and Corps districts on compensatory mitigation. Much of his work has focused on education of Corps, federal, and state agencies in administrative and ecological aspects of compensatory mitigation. He also is the Corps’ national technical lead for RIBITS (Regulatory In-lieu fee and Bank Information Tracking System). Before coming to IWR he was a senior environmental scientist in the Norfolk District Regulatory Branch. He oversaw development and operations of a number of commercial mitigation banks.

Michelle Mattson

Michelle Mattson is a Stream and Wetland Ecologist with the U.S. Army Corfps of Engineers’ Institute for Water Resources (IWR) with over 20 years of professional experience as a consultant and regulator. Michelle is a compensatory mitigation subject matter expert (SME) and the IWR Regulatory Team budget manager. She supports national and regional training courses in compensatory mitigation and has spent her career in the field working with restoration teams to design, install and monitor restoration projects and programs. At the USACE, Michelle worked across agencies to develop the Advanced Permittee-Responsible Mitigation (APRM) Program for San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) and managed multiple banks and ILFs. As a consultant, she worked on two Special Area Managements Plans (SAMPs), the Otay River Watershed Management Plan, and several Mitigation Banks and ILF sites and multiple large-scale stream restoration projects in alignment with existing and planned USFWS habitat conservation plans (HCPs) and new SDRWQCB water quality requirements. She was a member of the California Wetland Monitoring Workgroup Level 2 (rapid assessment) Committee and was the first to use CRAM in evaluating impacts, alternatives analysis, and monitoring compensatory mitigation to improve decision making in LA District for several large alternative energy projects. Michelle remains a huge supporter of using functional and conditional assessments in regulatory and restoration practices including in informing the location and design of sites to short- and long-term monitoring performance and condition of sites.

Michael S. RolbandMichael (Mike) S. Rolband is the founder of Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. (WSSI), a 175+ person natural and cultural resources consulting firm headquartered in Gainesville, Virginia, and a subsidiary of The Davey Tree Expert Company. Mike founded WSSI in 1991 and pioneered its growth and expansion from the one-person wetlands consulting firm, to the multi-discipline natural and cultural resource consulting firm that today operates from four offices focused on permitting and regulatory requirements for the Clean Water Act, Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act, and Stormwater.

Mike is responsible for development of the first wetlands bank in Virginia in 1994 and the first mitigation bank to provide stream credits in Virginia in 2001. He also formed a non-profit to manage the Wetland Research Initiative, a research program that has funded $3.6 million in grants to several universities since 2007 – dedicated to advancing the state of the science of Mitigation. Between mitigation banks and permittee-responsible mitigation, WSSI has designed over 1,000 acres of wetland mitigation and over 280,000 linear feet of stream restoration projects.

Mike has served on the Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance Board and many state and local committees dealing with the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act, stormwater regulations, and wetlands/stream regulations. In 2017 he accepted an appointment as a part-time Professor of Practice in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University, and now invests his time and expertise teaching graduate students about the design and challenges of wetlands and stream restoration projects. Mike is an alumnus of Cornell, where he obtained his BS in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Master of Engineering (Civil), and MBA.

Karen GreeneKaren Greene is the Mid-Atlantic Field Offices Supervisor for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Fisheries Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office’s (GARFO) Habitat Conservation Division and is also the GARFO Essential Fish Habitat Coordinator. She has been with NOAA Fisheries for more than 25 years, working primarily in the Mid-Atlantic region, especially in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania. Her primary focus has been to provide advice and guidance to federal agencies on avoiding, minimizing and offsetting adverse impacts to coastal fish habitats through a number of consultation authorities such as the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Karen has been involved in the evaluation of compensatory mitigation plans for more than two decades and participated on many interagency review teams (IRTs) for wetland mitigation banks, including the Meadowlands Interagency Mitigation Advisory Committee originally convened in 1998, as well as the IRTs for the first federally approved mitigation banks in NJ and NY. Karen is co-located at the NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center at their James J. Howard Marine Science Laboratory at Sandy Hook, NJ. She has a BS and MS in Environmental Science, both from Rutgers University.


  

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Part 4A: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers Presenter: Steve Martin, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 4B: Presenter: Michelle Mattson, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 4C: Presenter: Michael S. Rolband, P.E., P.W.S., P.W.D., Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc.

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Part 4D: Presenter: Karen Green, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries)

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Part 4E: Questions/Answers

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View Past ACOE Compensatory Mitigation Training Webinars Here

View a List of Past ACOE Compensatory Mitigation Training Webinar Recordings Here

Certificate of Participation - Capacity Building Webinar - September 16, 2020

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the September 16, 2020 Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Project Webinar Series: Conducting State/Tribal Review of the 2020 Nationwide Permits

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Capacity Building webinar “Conducting State/Tribal Review of the 2020 Nationwide Permits” on Wednesday, September 16, 2020 from 3:00-5:00 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Tribal Wetland Programs Webinars

EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Training WebinarsASWM and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 developed a short series of educational webinars for Region 10 tribes with practical and useful information to assist in planning for wetland management and integrating management of wetlands with other tribal resources. A steering committee of tribal representatives from Region 10 provided guidance on webinar content, including representatives from the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation, Snoqualmie Tribe, Yakama Nation, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Sitka Tribe, Tulalip Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Nez Perce Tribe, Cowlitz Tribe and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe. Although focused on tribes from EPA Region 10, these webinars maybe useful for tribes located all across the United States.

For more information and/or to join our email list for notices about upcoming events, please contact Laura Burchill at or (207) 892-3399.

If you haven’t used Go To Webinar before or you just need a refresher, please view our guide prior to the webinar here.

View Past EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Programs Webinar Series Here

View a List of EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Programs Webinar Recordings Here

Please check back for future EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Programs Webinars. Thank you.

2018 Past Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series

Webinar 3: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Biotic Processes

Held Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 2:00-5:00 pm

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

DOCUMENTS OF INTEREST

ABSTRACT

Over the past three decades compensatory mitigation has become an important strategy for addressing the unavoidable environmental impacts that result from dredge and fill activities. Compensatory mitigation projects should be designed to provide self-sustaining, long-term replacement of lost ecological functions and services.  Federal and State regulatory staff routinely review these proposals to ensure that projects will achieve the desired outcomes.  But what exactly should compensatory mitigation project reviewers consider in evaluating a proposal?  The purpose of this third of four webinars was to assist compensatory mitigation project reviewers by providing information about how to evaluate biotic processes—plants, animals, etc. and explore 1) how they are linked to hydrology, soils and other biotic characteristics, 2) how biotic elements provide indicators of wetland health and function and 3) how to measure progress using performance standards and monitoring plans. During the webinar the use of and selection of reference wetlands to determine appropriate biological communities to restore (e.g., planting palettes) was also explored. By linking all these elements together presenters provided insights into how to manage abiotic and biotic elements to restore high quality, high functioning wetlands. These topics were explored using examples of freshwater wetlands including vernal pools, floodplains, riverine and coastal projects. The webinar presentations ran around 120 minutes and wad followed by a questions and answer session.

BIOS

Matt Gause is the Ecological Resources & Land Stewardship Director at Westervelt Ecological Services and oversees Westervelt’s land stewardship and ecological resources on over 8,000 acres of restored wetlands and endangered species habitat on 18,000 acres of preserved properties in California, the Rocky Mountain region and southeastern United States. Mr Gause has over 25 years of experience with wetland restoration including the restoration of vernal pools, riparian forest, tidal marsh, and floodplain wetlands. He has also managed conserved lands for more than 15 threatenend or endangered species on preserves throughout California.

In addition, Mr. Gause provides site suitability analyses during the land acquisition process, including restoration suitability, threatened and endangered species, easement restriction analysis, and future land management cost estimation. Mr. Gause also develops and implements both baseline and long-term land management and monitoring strategies for mitigation and conservation landscapes.

Mr. Gause is a Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner (CERP) and received a Bachelor of Science in Botany from the University of California at Davis

Mick Micacchion is a Professional Wetland Scientist and works as a restoration ecologist with The Nature Conservancy for the Ohio In-Lieu-Fee Compensatory Mitigation Program. He has a BS and MS in Wildlife Management, both from Ohio State University. Mick retired in 2011 from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) with 32 years of state service including 10 years with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. While working for 20 years at Ohio EPA he was instrumental in the development of Ohio’s Wetland Water Quality Standards rules, wetland assessment tools, including the Ohio Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (ORAM), Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity (VIBI), Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity (AmphIBI), “Standardized Monitoring Protocols and Performance Standards for Ohio Mitigation Wetlands” and their integration into Ohio’s wetland program, which has worked as a model for the country.

Mick also works for the non-profit Midwest Biodiversity Institute (MBI) where he has served as a wetland ecologist for the past seven years. Currently he instructs courses in Wetland Botany, Wetland Delineation, Ohio Amphibians, Ohio Wetland Assessment Methods, including ORAM, VIBI/VIBI-FQ, and AmphIBI, as well as several other courses at MBI. He has monitored the physical, chemical and biological features, including the soils, hydrology, chemistry, plant, amphibian and macroinvertebrate communities of hundreds of Ohio’s natural wetlands and trained hundreds of wetland professionals in the development and use of wetland monitoring and assessment methods, including ORAM, VIBI and AmphIBI. He has also monitored, assessed, and reported on the condition of hundreds of Ohio compensatory wetland mitigation projects and spent more than a decade on Ohio’s Interagency Review Team, where he was a major contributor to the “Guidelines on Wetland Mitigation Banking in Ohio.” Mick was a member of the Technical Advisory Group, which developed the methods used in the National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA), and lead crews and managed others for both the 2011 and 2016 NWCAs sampling wetlands in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kentucky, Tennessee, and 10 other states.

He is the Vice President of the Ohio Wetlands Association and was a founder and has been active with the Ohio Vernal Pool Network since 2004. 

Gretchen Coffman is an Associate Professor at the University of San Francisco. Dr. Coffman is a restoration ecologist and Associate Professor at the University of San Francisco (USF) who has worked on wetland and riparian restoration projects throughout the U.S. and internationally for more than 28 years. Since 1991, she has conducted jurisdictional wetland delineations throughout California, the east coast, the southeast, Midwest, and Puerto Rico. In addition, she has applied ecological experience in vegetation and invasive plant species mapping, watershed assessment studies, historical ecology studies, rare plant surveys, and compensatory wetland mitigation projects.

Dr. Coffman's current research focuses on scientific questions with high relevance to management problems, mainly related to riparian plant ecology, restoration, and invasive plant biology in wetlands and river systems of mediterranean-type and tropical climates. Her research focuses on experimental wetland revegetation and restoration strategies, invasive plant ecology, and restoration monitoring to improve performance standards. She has on-going research projects along rivers and watersheds in coastal southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley of California, and Southeast Asia. In 2015, she led a National Geographic Expedition in the Annamite Mountains of Laos to document and begin restoration of the Critically Endangered Asian swamp cypress trees she discovered. Since then, her team has successfully propagated almost 2,000 seedlings and started restoration efforts in 2018. In 2016, she was the recipient of the Arthur Furst Faculty Research Award that honors USF Faculty or Alumnus whose work exemplifies research for the betterment of humanity.

Since 2010, she has taught field ecology courses in the Environmental Science Department, Masters of Science in Environmental Management graduate program, and Environmental Studies program at the USF. Courses include Basic and Advanced Wetland Delineation, Field Botany, California Ecosystems, Tropical Restoration Ecology in Borneo, Ecology and Human Impacts, and Introduction to Environmental Science. She developed a Wetland Delineation Certificate Program at USF in 2013 in which more than 70 students have completed. From 1996 – 2011, Dr. Coffman taught wetland ecology, delineation, and restoration courses in the Wetland Science Series at SFSU's Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies in Tiburon, California.

She holds a Ph.D. from UCLA, 2007, Environmental Science; a M.A. from SFSU, 1998, Ecology and Systematic Biology; and a B.A. from Colgate University, 1991, Biology.

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Part 3A: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Matt Gause, Westervelt Ecological Services

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Part 3B: Presenter: Mick Micacchion, The Nature Conservancy and Midwest Biodiversity Institute

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Part 3C: Presenter: Gretchen Coffman, University of San Francisco

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Part 3D: Questions & Answers

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Webinar 2: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Abiotic Processes 
 

Held Monday, July 16, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern, 1:00 central, 12:00 mountain, 11:00 pacific  

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

Over the past three decades compensatory mitigation has become an important strategy for addressing the adverse environmental impacts that result from dredge and fill activities. Compensatory mitigation project should be designed to replace lost ecological services at an alternative location.  Federal and State regulatory staff routinely review these proposals to ensure that projects will achieve the desired outcomes.  But what exactly should compensatory mitigation project reviewers consider in evaluating a proposal?  The purpose of this second of four webinars was to assist compensatory mitigation project reviewers by providing information about how to evaluate abiotic processes--soils and hydrology--critical to designing wetland restoration projects that will achieve project objectives and meet performance standards. Presenters focused on both abiotic and biotic characteristics of soils and their functions, review specific considerations with respect to hydrology and soils in tidal restoration projects, and describe a process for developing hydrology-based performance standards in freshwater systems.  The webinar presentations ran around 100 minutes and was followed by a questions and answer session.

BIOS

Lenore Vasilas is a USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Scientist on the Soil Science Division Technical Soil Services Staff. She has been a soil scientist for NRCS for 28 years working for the first 7 years on soil survey and the rest of her career in various positions concentrating on hydric soils issues. She has been a member of the National Technical Committee for Hydric Soils for 20 years and is the current chair of the committee.

Walter I. Priest, III after over 40 years in the public sector working for the Virginia Division of Shellfish Sanitation, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and the NOAA Restoration Center, Walter, currently works with his consulting firm, Wetland Design and Restoration. He is a Professional Wetland Scientist. His work experience at VIMS included: permit review and environment impact assessment, tidal wetlands inventories, beneficial use of dredged material and wetland restoration. While with the NOAA Restoration Center, he provided project management for a wide range of fisheries habitat restoration projects including: large and small scale tidal wetland restorations, oyster reefs, Living Shorelines, seagrass restoration and dam removal projects. He also designed and helped implement a number of tidal wetland restorations at remediated Super Fund sites. He has also developed Prospectus’ and design for two tidal wetland mitigation banks as well as conducted long-term monitoring of two other tidal wetland mitigation banks. During his career he has been involved with over 70 habitat restoration projects involving over 100 acres providing: design, detailed critical review, project management, construction oversight, volunteer plantings and/or long-term monitoring. He recently authored a chapter in the book, Living Shorelines: The Science and Management of Nature-based Shoreline Protection, entitled, Practical Living Shorelines: Tailored to Fit in Chesapeake Bay.

Steve Eggers is a Senior Ecologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District Regulatory Branch. He has worked with the Corps of Engineers for more than 40 years. Steve is widely recognized as a regional and national expert in wetlands, serving as a member of a national team responsible for updating the Corps wetland delineation manual, as well as participating in the update of the national wetland plant list and co-authoring the book Wetland Plants and Plant Communities of Minnesota and Wisconsin. Steve provides training and technical assistance with wetland delineations and restoration projects. He has helped further understanding of wetland science and connecting it with public policy.



 

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Part 2A: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation

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Part 2B: Presenter: Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation

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Part 2C: Presenter: Walter I. Priest, III, Wetland Design

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Part 2D: Presenter: Steve Eggers, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District

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Part 2E: Questions & Answers

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Webinar 1: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation 
 

Held Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern, 1:00 central, 12:00 mountain, 11:00 pacific 

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT 

Over the past three decades compensatory mitigation has become an important strategy for addressing the unavoidable environmental impacts that result from dredge and fill activities. Compensatory mitigation projects should be designed to provide self-sustaining, long-term replacement of lost ecological functions and services.  Federal and State regulatory staff routinely review these proposals to ensure that projects will achieve the desired outcomes.  But what exactly should compensatory mitigation project reviewers consider in evaluating a proposal?  The purpose of this webinar was to provide an overall framework for review of proposed compensatory mitigation projects.  Presenters focused on the processes that shape wetlands across diverse landscapes including the critical components of wetlands and wetland restoration project: hydrology, soils and vegetation. Landscape context, wetland classification, the use of reference wetlands, function and values, and temporal considerations will be discussed.

BIOS

Eric D. Stein, D.Env. is a Principal Scientist at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP), where he is head of the Biology Department. Dr. Stein oversees a variety of projects related to in-stream and coastal water quality, bioassessment, hydromodification, watershed modeling, and assessment of wetlands and other aquatic resources. His research focuses on effects of human activities on the condition of aquatic ecosystems, and on developing tools to better assess and manage those effects. Dr. Stein has authored over 100 journal articles and technical reports and participates on numerous technical workgroups and committees related to water quality and wetland assessment and management. Prior to joining SCCWRP in 2002, Dr. Stein spent six years as a Senior Project Manager with the Regulatory Branch of the Los Angeles District Corps of Engineers, and four years with a private consulting firm.

Jeremy Sueltenfuss is a Wetland Ecologist at Colorado State University, Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. His research focuses on wetland hydrology, and the hydrologic drivers of wetland form and function. Jeremy’s research has focused primarily on mountain systems, ranging from the wetlands of Juneau Alaska down to the Peruvian Andes. By understanding how water flows through and across the landscape, Jeremy tries to apply his research on degraded and hydrologically altered wetlands to restore these vital ecosystems. His dissertation research focused on the use of hydrologic performance standards for wetland mitigation.

W. Lee Daniels is the Thomas B. Hutcheson Professor of Environmental Soil Science at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in Soil Science from VPI & SU in 1985. Dr. Daniels areas of specialization include stabilization and restoration of disturbed lands including areas disturbed by mining, road building, waste disposal, urbanization and erosion. In particular, he has focused his research and consulting experience in wetland impact mitigation, mine reclamation, and soil-waste management systems. His teaching programs at Virginia Tech focus on soil geomorphology and landscape analysis with particular emphasis on the relationships among surficial geology, hydrology, soil patterns and long term landscape evolution processes. Major awards include the Reclamation Researcher of the Year by the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation (ASMR) in 1993, USEPA’s National Biosolids Utilization Research Award in 2000 and the Lifetime Achievement in Research Award by ASMR in 2012.
 

Matt Schweisberg () is the Principal of Wetland Strategies and Solutions, LLC (www.wetlandsns.com), where he provides policy, regulatory and technical advice and assistance for clients seeking to navigate a wide range of regulatory and non-regulatory issues related to wetlands and other aquatic resources. He works throughout the U.S. Matt is a Professional Wetland Scientist under the Professional Certification Program of the Society of Wetland Scientists. He is a retired federal wetlands ecologist and wildlife biologist who spent over 32 years with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at its HQ office in Washington, D.C. and New England Region office in Boston. Matt served as Chief of the New England Region’s Wetlands Protection Program and Senior Wetland Ecologist, and on national work groups developing guidance and regulations on Clean Water Act jurisdiction. He has testified before federal grand juries and served several times as an expert witness in federal, state, and private litigation. He co-instructs a week-long intensive course on wetland identification and delineation at the Eagle Hill Institute in Maine, and has taught courses in wetland regulation, restoration and creation, wetland ecology, and wetland identification and delineation for federal and state agencies, academic organizations, and environmental consultants. He received his degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Maine.

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Part 1A: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Eric Stein, Principal Scientist, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project

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Part 1B: Presenter: Eric Stein, Principal Scientist, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project

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Part 1C: Presenter: Jeremy Sueltenfuss, Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University

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Part 1D: Presenter: W. Lee Daniels, Thomas B. Hutcheson Professor of Environmental Soil Science at Virginia Tech

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Part 1E: Presenter: Matt Schweisberg, Principal of Wetland Strategies and Solutions, LLC< /b>

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Part 1F: Questions & Answers

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View Past Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series Here

View a List of Past Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series Recordings Here