Beaver Restoration for Climate Resiliency

Held Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern   

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INTRODUCTION

PRESENTER

ABTRACT

The final webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the role that beaver restoration can play in building climate resiliency to drought and wildfires. Beaver dams are gaining popularity as a low‐tech, low‐cost strategy to build climate resiliency at the landscape scale. They slow and store water that can be accessed by riparian vegetation during dry periods, effectively protecting riparian ecosystems from droughts. The webinar showcased research which indicates that beavers are able to create and maintain wetlands resistant to both seasonal and multiyear droughts and that this landscape wetting and drought buffering goes on to reduce or prevent burning in wildfire. Perhaps instead of relying solely on human engineering and management to create and maintain fire‐resistant landscape patches, we could benefit from beaver’s ecosystem engineering to achieve the same goals at a lower cost.

BIO

Emily FairfaxDr. Emily Fairfax is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Resource Management at California State University Channel Islands. Dr. Fairfax double majored in Chemistry and Physics as an undergraduate at Carleton College, then went on to earn a PhD in Geological Sciences from the University of Colorado Boulder. She uses a combination of remote sensing and field work to research how beaver activity can create drought and fire-resistant patches in the landscape under a changing climate. Her colleagues and students can vouch that when Dr. Fairfax says she can talk about beavers all day, she’s not kidding.

  

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands
PlayPlay

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;
Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands

Part 2: Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands
PlayPlay

Part 2: Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands

Part 3: Questions & Answers
PlayPlay

Part 3: Questions & Answers

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<b>Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter:  Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands</b>
<b>Part 2: Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands</b>
Part 3: Questions & Answers
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Coalition Building for Beaver Based Stream and Wetland Restoration Success

Held Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern

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INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This fifth webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on how coalition building is essential to advancing the practice of process-based stream and floodplain restoration by helping the regulatory environment be responsive to the evolving understanding around functioning, intact riverscapes. Intentional and inclusive outreach efforts and creative partnerships are critical to achieving positive restoration outcomes. Restoring floodplains based on mimicking beaver dam inundated wetlands and their inherent complexity is a paradigm shift for the stream and wetland restoration community. Practitioners are eager to engage and the science community has jumped in to lead on methods for restoration, evaluation, and assessment. However, the regulatory community, both the formal statutory authority content and the interpretation of these regulations to allow on-the-ground restoration actions, has not seen the same degree of development. As such, a growing gap between natural process-based restoration methods and the legal authority for their implementation threatens to stall the vital progress science-based stream restoration is making. Cultural change is necessary to bridge this gap and generate the required broad understanding and adoption of novel best practices. Only through inclusive coalitions building will it be possible to develop commonly held values around functioning, process-based, vibrant ecosystems that support the natural and human ecologies essential for resilient ecosystems.

BIOS

Chris JohnsonDr. Chris Jordan is a Research Fisheries Biologist with NOAA/NMFS’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Program Manager for the Mathematical Biology and Systems Monitoring Program. Trained as a mathematical biologist, he has worked on a wide range of biological topics, all with an emphasis on the development or application of quantitative methods. His recent work has focused on the design and implementation of large-scale monitoring programs to assess anadromous salmonid freshwater habitat and population status as well as the watershed-scale effect of management actions on salmonid habitat and population processes. Some current projects include the development of life-cycle simulation models to integrate knowledge on physical and biological processes into a management decision support framework and the development of methods for stream restoration focusing on beaver and process-based thinking. 

Alexa WhippleAlexa Whipple as an ecologist, a farmer, and the Project Director for the Methow Beaver Project, Alexa works for sustainability in all practices and effective natural process solutions to challenging environmental conditions. She has called the Methow Valley home for the last 20 years but has worked across the western US growing food and studying songbirds, carnivores, plant communities, agricultural impacts on habitat and wildlife, and wildfire impacts on western riparian ecosystems. Alexa completed her MS in Restoration Ecology at Eastern Washington University where she focused on beaver ecology and beaver mediated restoration of degraded and wildfire impacted streams in the Methow River watershed. 


Natalie ArroyoNatalie Arroyo lives and works in beautiful Eureka, California. Natalie is currently serving her 2nd term on the Eureka City Council. Representing Eureka, Natalie serves as chair of the Humboldt Transit Authority. She is currently a member of the US Coast Guard Reserve. Natalie is also a lecturer at Humboldt State University in the Environmental Science and Management department, and a senior planner with the Natural Resources Services division of Redwood Community Action Agency, a non-profit organization. Natalie also serves on the board of the Klamath River Renewal Corporation, and previously served as board president of the Humboldt Trails Council, and as a board member of the Salmonid Restoration Federation. In her spare time she enjoys playing roller derby, outdoor recreation activities of all kinds, and time spent with her husband and their two small but tenacious dogs. 


Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter: Chris Jordan, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center
PlayPlay

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Chris Jordan, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Part 2: Presenter: Alexa Whipple, Methow Beaver Project
PlayPlay

Part 2: Presenter: Alexa Whipple, Methow Beaver Project

Part 3: Presenter: Natalie Arroyo
PlayPlay

Part 3: Presenter: Natalie Arroyo

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<b>Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;  Presenter: Chris Jordan, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center</b>
<b>Part 2: Presenter: Alexa Whipple, Methow Beaver Project</b>
Part 3: Presenter: Natalie Arroyo
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View Past Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here

2020
 

View a List of Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here