Members' Wetland WebinarThe Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) holds a webinar each month for its members. ASWM Member webinars cover a variety of topics encompassing wetland science, policy, program implementation, and legal issues. These webinars, including recordings for past webinars are available to ASWM members. If you are not a member, you are invited to join ASWM. For information about membership, click here.

For more information about this webinar series, please contact Laura Burchill at or (207) 892-3399.

If you haven’t used Go To Webinar before or you just need a refresher, please view our guide prior to the webinar here.

View Past ASWM Members' Webinar Series Here 

View a List of Past ASM Members' Webinar Series Recordings Here



 
Transforming Communications with the Public about Water Quality: How to Use EPA's "How's My Waterway" Data Application

Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Eastern

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PRESENTER

  • Kiki Schneider, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 

ABSTRACT

EPA’s “How’s My Waterway” application has transformed how EPA is able to communicate with the general public about water quality. This webinar will focus on what information is available in the application and how it can be used to inform states, tribes and citizens about their water (including wetlands), with an additional focus on tribal data now included in the tool. A factsheet about the tool can be downloaded here.

EPA worked in close partnership with states and tribes on the development and release of the “How’s My Waterway” application, which was built on a decade-long process of implementing and promoting data standards and data integrity, developing electronic reporting methods, opening data access via web services, and integrating data across EPA systems.

“How’s My Waterway” answers questions about health of waters in supporting swimming, the eating of fish, drinking water protection and delivery, the health of aquatic communities, and the restoration and protection of waterways. The application also enables the integration of this vital water information with other relevant data, including the recent addition of demographic indicators from EPA’s Environmental Justice Screening Tool, EJ Screen.

EPA’s application also provides the public with an easily accessible and understandable picture of water quality on three scales: community, state, and national. Communities use “How’s My Waterway” to learn about their watershed. When a watershed is shown to have impairments or other issues, people are inspired to get involved to protect and restore their waterways. The visual representation empowered by the application gives this data more perspective and transparency allowing the public to feel more connected to their waters and provide clear access to the information that EPA is collecting in partnership with the states and tribes.

BIO

Kiki Schneider

Kiki Schneider works at EPA headquarters in the Office of Water and is the project manager for How’s My Waterway. She has a background in user-centered design and environmental policy and has spent the last few years developing How’s My Waterway so that the general public can have easy access to water quality information.

 





Register Here

 

 
A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits will be available for this webinar. Free Certificates of Participation are a benefit of ASWM membership. Non-Members who request a certificate will be charged a processing fee of $25.00. Certificates are not available for viewing recorded webinars. Click here for more Information.
 

Coastal Wetland Migration as a Climate Change Resiliency Strategy: Conservation Planning and Decision Making

Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Eastern

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PRESENTER

  • Mary Schoell, NOAA Digital Coast Fellow

ABSTRACT

While coastal wetlands provide essential benefits to our coastal communities, they are at serious risk from the impacts of climate change, land use development, and shoreline hardening. One coastal resilience strategy is to conserve upland areas to allow for coastal wetlands to migrate inland in the face of sea-level rise. In this webinar, attendees will learn about coastal wetland migration, current research on the drivers of migration rates, how some coastal managers are addressing coastal wetland migration, useful resources to launch and support this work, and a current effort to assess what decision-makers in conservation, management, planning, and policy need to advance protection of habitat for future coastal wetlands.

BIO

Mary Schoell

Mary Schoell is a NOAA Digital Coast Fellow hosted by the National Estuarine Research Reserve Association (NERRA) and the Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), where she is applying social science methods to assess stakeholder needs as they relate to protecting habitat for coastal wetland migration. As a coastal ecologist by training, Mary has over eight years of experience working on coastal wetland issues related to climate change, human impacts, and restoration efforts. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from the University of Connecticut and a master’s degree from the Yale School of the Environment. During her time at Yale, she studied the effects of sea-level rise and storm surge on salt marsh migration into coastal forests along Long Island Sound.


Register Here 




A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits will be available for this webinar. Free Certificates of Participation are a benefit of ASWM membership. Non-Members who request a certificate will be charged a processing fee of $25.00. Certificates are not available for viewing recorded webinars. Click here for more Information.
 



Managing Impacts to Wetlands from Solar Development

Wednesday, April 27, 2022 - 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Eastern

Register Here

 

  

PRESENTER

  • Laura Lapierre, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation

ABSTRACT

Having trouble understanding the extent of ground-mounted solar panel array effects to wetland resources? You are not alone. Close to 10 years ago, the State of Vermont started incentivizing solar which lead to the unintended consequence of increased pressure to develop within and adjacent to wetland resources. This pressure has generated a greater knowledge of wetland impact avoidance and minimization techniques for solar development, and has also yielded more questions to explore. This webinar will give you the Vermont Wetlands Program’s journey of reviewing this unique type of development and will provide advice on avoiding and minimizing impacts of solar projects to wetlands. The presentation will also delve into Vermont’s ongoing solar observations, five-year monitoring study, and policy development.

Laurie LapierreBIO

Laura Lapierre is the Program Manager for the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Wetlands Program. The VT Wetlands Program administers the Vermont Wetland Rules, assesses the State's wetland health, maps wetlands, and assists voluntary restoration. In Laura’s 8 years managing the program, she and her team have reviewed many solar development proposals, construction sites, and operational sites. Laura has a MS in Biology from McGill University.

Register Here

 

 

 
A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits will be available for this webinar. Free Certificates of Participation are a benefit of
ASWM membership. Non-Members who request a certificate will be charged a processing fee of $25.00. Certificates are not available for viewing recorded webinars. Click here for more Information.


 To view Past Members' Wetland Webinars:

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Nonmembers To view recent Members' Webinars, please join ASWM. 

View Past Member' Webinar Series Here

View a List of Past Members' Webinar Series Recordings Here