The Association of State Wetland Managers is a nonprofit membership organization established in 1983 to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources, to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts and to provide training and education for our members and the public. Membership is open to anyone who is involved with wetland resources.

2021 Past Hot Topics Webinars

Looking Back, Looking Forward: A Review of Trump Administration Rulemakings and Charting a Path Forward

Held Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 2:00pm-4:00pm ET

View Webinar Here

INTRODUCTION

  • Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers

POWERPOINT PRESENTATION

PRESENTERS

  • Julia Anastasio, Association of Clean Water Administrators 
  • Royal Gardner, Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy Stetson University College of Law [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
  • James M. McElfish, Jr., Senior Attorney, Environmental Law Institute 
  • Donna Downing, Senior Legal Policy Advisor, Association of State Wetland Managers
  • Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers 

ABSTRACT

The Trump Administration has been a time of substantial change to aquatic resource protection programs, as well as to rulemaking processes used to define program requirements.  For example, on January 30, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order (E.O.) 13771, Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs, which spearheaded his Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions and directed all agencies to repeal at least two existing regulations for each new regulation issued in FY 2017 and thereafter. This initial E.O. laid the context for the subsequent E.O. 13778, Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the “Waters of the United States” Rule, which was published in the Federal Register just four days later, on February 28.   The extent and speed of changes to aquatic resource protection programs has posed substantial challenges to states and tribes who have substantial responsibility under the federal Clean Water Act (CWA).

Clean Water Act programs address “waters of the United States,” and as a result the regulatory definition of that threshold term determines the scope of multiple aquatic resource and water quality protections. The Trump Administration’s 2020 Navigable Waters Protection Rule (NWPR) replaced the Obama Administration’s 2015 Clean Water Rule with a narrower definition of WOTUS.  Because CWA programs address waters of the US, the new narrower definition created a domino effect and reduced the extent of protections from those programs.  For example, CWA Section 401 certifications are required only for permits or licenses that may result in discharges into WOTUS, Nationwide Permits under section 404 apply only to discharges of dredged or fill material into WOTUS, as does section 404’s requirement for compensatory mitigation for impacts to WOTUS.  As the extent of waters considered to be WOTUS shrinks, so do the protections of programs such as these.  In addition, the Trump Administration has undertaken rulemaking to revise these and other CWA programs, further affecting the programs’ abilities to protect aquatic resource and water quality. 

In this webinar, the implications of these changes for state and tribal aquatic resource programs were examined and discussions included past, recent and ongoing rulemakings and court cases, enforcement issues, points of process for moving forward, and potential actions by the new Biden Administration. 

BIOS

Julia AnastasioJulia Anastasio joined the Association of Clean Water Administrators in May 2014 as the Executive Director and General Counsel. ACWA is an independent, nonpartisan national organization of state and interstate water program managers, who on a daily basis implement the water quality programs of the federal Clean Water Act. At ACWA, Ms. Anastasio focuses on working with state water program directors and EPA’s Office of Water on ensuring that the states have the resources they need to implement the Clean Water Act in their home states. Ms. Anastasio has over two decades of experience in government, administrative and environmental law and federal policy development. She began her career with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection as an Executive Policy Specialist and returned to Washington, DC in 2005 to work for the America Public Works Association (APWA). While at APWA, she focused on environmental, sustainability and infrastructure development at the local, state and federal levels. Ms. Anastasio earned her B.A. from Franklin Marshall College, her Masters in Environmental Law and Policy from Vermont Law School, and her J.D. from American University.

Royal GarnderRoyal C. Gardner is Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law. He is an internationally recognized expert in wetland law and policy. Recent projects include serving as the Chair of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, testifying before a World Bank arbitration panel, advising the Government of Oman regarding wetland policy, and coauthoring amicus briefs on behalf of environmental scientists. In WOTUS-related litigation, he has filed amicus briefs in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and in the U.S. District Courts for the District of North Dakota and the Southern District of New York.



McElfishJames M. McElfish, Jr. is a Senior Attorney; Director with the Environmental Law Institute Sustainable Use of Land Program. Jim McElfish’s research focuses on development choices and their links to land use, water resources, biological diversity, and infrastructure policy. ELI’s Sustainable Use of Land Program makes connections among laws, policies, taxes, investments, and land use decisions. His work includes research on coastal zone activities, renewable energy siting, enforcement, and conservation outcomes. McElfish served as representative of the natural environment on the American Planning Association’s multi-year Growing Smarter Legislative Guidebook Directorate. McElfish also leads ELI programs on water resources, examining how watersheds and resources can be evaluated, used, conserved, and restored. He is a nationally recognized authority on NEPA and a former litigator in private practice and with the Department of the Interior. McElfish has been an ELI Senior Attorney since 1986.


Donna DowningDonna Downing is the Senior Legal Policy Advisor, Association of State Wetland Managers. Donna was the Jurisdiction Team Leader in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Donna worked on a variety of issues at EPA, with a focus in recent years on the geographic scope of the Clean Water Act (CWA) in light of the U.S. Supreme Court decisions. She also served as EPA’s staff lead for CWA section 401 water quality certification, and on wetland-related legal issues. Prior to joining EPA in 1998, Donna worked for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and in private law practice. She has a BA magna cum laude from Harvard University, an MPP from the University of California at Berkeley, a JD cum laude from Georgetown University Law School, and an LLM in Environmental Law summa cum laude from George Washington University Law School. Donna has been an adjunct professor at George Washington University Law School since 1996, teaching environmental law. In what’s left of her time, she moonlights as a professional potter and an unprofessional horse trainer. Donna also enjoys traveling and has traveled by reindeer sled in the Swedish Arctic, gone winter camping with dog sleds in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Wilderness Area, and bicycled the Burma Road in China.

Marla StelkMarla Stelk is the Executive Director at the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) where she has worked on wetland policy and management issues since 2013. Marla has over 25 years of experience working on wetland, water, and wildlife issues, policy and research, land use planning, communications and organizational leadership. Marla has led research at ASWM on topics such as ecosystem service valuation for wetland restoration, the role of wetlands in floodplain and natural hazard management, wetlands and watershed health, wetland mapping and communications. Prior to coming to ASWM, Marla worked for a variety of environmental and social nonprofit organizations helping to build organizational capacity, manage projects and improve internal processes. Marla also has a successful background in small business management and ran her own custom metal sculpture studio for 15 years. Marla earned her MA in Community Planning and Development with a focus on Land Use and the Environment at the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service and her BA in Environmental Issues from Colorado College. 


Play

Part 1: Introduction: Part 1: Marla Stelk, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenters: Royal Gardner, Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy Stetson University College of Law and Julia Anastasio, Association of Clean Water Administrators

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Part 2: Presenters: Julia Anastasio, Association of Clean Water Administrators; Donna Downing, Senior Legal Policy Advisor, Association of State Wetland Managers; and Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers

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Part 3: Presenter: James M. McElfish, Jr., Senior Attorney, Environmental Law Institute
Question & Answers

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About Certificates of Participation

About Certificates of Participation

A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits is available when participating in ASWM's live webinars. All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members who request a certificate will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. You will have up to 60 days to retrieve your certificate. After 60 days, certificates are $25 regardless of membership status. The certificate can be used to submit toward continuing education credits with your accrediting organization. Following the webinar, attendees will receive a link with instructions on how to obtain the certificate. Certificates are not available for viewing recorded webinars.

If you are not a current member, we encourage you to go to the JOIN/RENEW webpage and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.

Thank you.

  

Wetland Link International - Americas Webinar: Cómo atraer de forma efectiva visitantes locales a Centros de Humedales

Wetland Link International - Americas Webinar:
Cómo atraer de forma efectiva visitantes locales a Centros de Humedales

Hosted by the Association of State Wetland Managers

Martes 30 de Mayo de 2017 – 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT (UTC -5)

Resumen del seminario

Muchos sitios de humedales deben trabajar duro para involucrar la comunidad local, proveyendo materiales de comunicación y de publicidad, tratando de hacerlos relevantes para un amplio rango de actores locales. Sin embargo, muchos de nosotros aún tenemos problemas para atraer gente a nuestros humedales, y éste seminario on-line analiza cómo aprender los unos de los otros las mejores formas de hacer que los humedales sean relevantes para la gente de su zona.

Si trabaja en humedales o en educación y sensibilización ambiental en las Américas, Wetland Link International (WLI) Américas y la Association of State Wetland Managers le invitan a participar de éste seminario on-line gratuito. Las presentaciones tratarán sobre las prácticas de participación y las lecciones aprendidas sobre varios aspectos del compromiso ambiental en sitios de humedales, incluyendo casos de estudio de socios de WLI en América del Norte, Central y del Sur. También proporcionaremos traducción consecutiva español-inglés e inglés-español. 


PRESENTACIONES

Introducción (inglés) - Chris Rostron, Wetland Link International, Reino Unido

Chris gestiona el proyecto global de WLI, una red de apoyo para quienes realizan actividades de educación, participación y sensibilización en centros de educación sobre humedales. Él presentará la red WLI Américas, el tema del seminario y los participantes.

Involucrar a los vecinos (inglés) - Nathalie Bays, Oak Hammock Marsh, Canada

Mantener exposiciones y programación al día puede ser un desafío. Aprenda cómo el Centro de Interpretación Oak Hammock Marsh trabaja para mantener su relevancia para la comunidad local a través de una variedad de programas atractivos.

Uso de las redes sociales para atraer visitantes a su sitio (español) - Daniel Bernal, Wetlands Bogotá, Colombia

Trabajar para mejor involucrar a las personas en los humedales urbanos de la capital de Colombia, Bogotá, ha significado utilizar las redes sociales de diferentes formas para atraer gente. Daniel hablará de lo que funciona y lo que no.

Volando como un águila – El uso de cámaras de animales silvestres para atraer visitantes locales e internacionales (inglés) - John DeFillipo, John Bunker Sands Wetland Center, Texas, US

El Centro John Bunker Sands Wetland tiene una pareja de águilas calvas americanas que nidifica en el sitio y puede ser monitoreada a través una de las cámaras de vida silvestre en nuestro website. El presentador explicará cómo éste servicio atrae visitantes locales e internacionales, así como conservacionistas, para convertirse en la misión de conservación del centro.

El uso de eventos especiales para involucrar el público local en el sitio (español) - Ingrid M. Flores, Coordinadora Regional del Caribe del Día Internacional de las Aves Migratorias y del Festival de Aves Endémicas del Caribe 

Todos los años durante la primavera y otoño se celebra el Día Internacional de las Aves Migratorias (DIAM) con eventos y actividades coordinadas entre varios sitios del hemisferio occidental. El DIAM es un proyecto de educación de Environment for the Americas y Birds Caribbean celebra el Festival de Aves Endémicas del Caribe (CEBF) desde 22 de abril (Día de la Tierra) hasta el 22 de mayo (Día de la Biodiversidad). Ingrid hablará sobre cómo planificar y presentar eventos emocionantes e inclusivos en los sitios.

Discusión interactiva

La última parte del seminario estará dedicada a la discusión interactiva, donde lo invitamos a compartir sus experiencias de participación y compromiso de ciudadanos locales en proyectos de protección de humedales.

BIOS

Chris Rostron es el Administrador del Programa de Wetland Link Interational, basado en Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) en el Reino Unido. Trabaja en éste puesto desde hace seis años. Tiene experiencia en participación y sensibilización de la comunidad en temas ambientales y en desarrollo de redes y tiene un Master en Gestion Ambiental, centrada en la gestion de cuencas hidrográficas. 

Nathalie Bays es la Gerente de Operaciones en el premiado Centro de Interpretación Oak Hammock Marsh en Manitoba, Canadá. Originaria de la provincia de Quebec, tiene un BSC en Fauna y un Master en Ciencias de Recursos Naturales. Trabajó como Coordinadora de Educación durante 14 años en el Centro de Interpretación, y ha sido la Gerente por los últimos seis. El Centro de Interpretación Oak Hammock Marsh es un galardonado centro de educación sobre humedales ubicado al norte de Winnipeg, que tiene como misión “Conectar las personas con los humedales”.

John DeFillipo, Director del Centro John Bunker Sands Wetland, es un naturalista con más de 20 años de experiencia integrando conceptos ecological con ideas de negocios. John ha sido un naturalista en el Centro de Educación Ambiental Camp McDowell en Alabama y en el Centro de Educación Ambiental Crow's Neck en Mississippi. En 2002, se convirtió en educador de extensión en el Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Mississippi, donde presentó programas de especies en peligro de extinción, incluyendo cocodrilos vivos. Mientras vivía en Mississippi, John trabajó como presidente de la Alianza de Educación Ambiental de Mississippi y recibió el Premio Educador Ambiental del Año 2008. En 2008 se fue Educador de Ciencias Naturales en el Museo Perot de Naturaleza y Ciencia, antes de convertirse en Director del Centro de Humedal en marzo de 2010. En agosto de 2015, John recibió el Premio al Mejor Líder de la Asociación de Administradores de Centros Naturales (ANCA) Actualmente es Vicepresidente de Desarrollo.

Daniel Bernal es ingeniero electrónico. Socio fundador de la Fundación Humedales Bogotá, Programa REtroCD y Amigo de la Veeduría de la Reserva Van der Hammen; ambientalista, periodista ciudadano y activista ambiental, pajarero, Yoga, Vegetarianismo; vive en un humedal.

La fundación Humedales Bogotá fue ganadora del Premio de la Convención de Ramsar a Jóvenes defensores de los humedales, 2015 y del Premio Colombia en Línea como mejor sitio de investigación en Colombia del año 2012.

Daniel es socio del programa RetroCD, primer programa de recolección de CDs/DVDs para su reciclaje en Latinoamérica y es parte del equipo de comunicaciones de la Red de Amigos de la Veeduría de la Reserva Thomas Van der Hammen.

Ha sido catalogado como: “Los y las ambientalistas de Colombia que debería seguir en twitter en 2016” por Red por la Justicia Ambiental en Colombia.

Columnista en la celebración de los 130 años del Diario El Espectador con el artículo: “Los humedales de Bogotá: un oasis en la gran ciudad”


Ingrid M. Flores es bióloga de vida silvestre con experiencia en investigación, enseñando ciencia y trabajando con el público. Ingrid también es gerente de proyectos y bióloga de vida silvestre en el Programa de Conservación de Tortugas Marinas de Palmas del Mar Resort en Humacao, Puerto Rico.

Ingrid coordina las actividades de CEBF y DIAM en el Caribe, trabajando con más de 30 coordinadores desde Bermuda hasta Bonaire. Esto implica ayudar a los coordinadores a planificar sus actividades, facilitar su trabajo con los medios locales, distribuir materiales de educación y divulgación sobre las aves del Caribe y el tema del festival a la red de coordinadores. Ingrid tiene un diploma MS en Manejo Ambiental y trabajó como profesora adjunta al Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Tecnologías de la Universidad del Turabo en Gurabo, Puerto Rico, donde enseñó biología a estudiantes de pregrado.

 

Basado en la demanda: Opción de traducción consecutiva en tiempo real entre inglés y español

De acuerdo con la cantidad de solicitudes, podemos ofrecer la opción de presentar el webinario con traducción consecutiva entre español e inglés. Este servicio debe ser preparado con bastante tiempo de anticipación, por lo que necesitamos que nos comunique si le interesa participar del seminario escuchando la traducción del audio en español.

 

"Cuando haga click en el botón de registro, se le solicitará completar la siguiente información usando éstas palabras en inglés: "First Name" (Nombre);"Last Name" (Apellido); "Email Address (Correo electrónico) y "Organization" (Organismo).

Certificate of Participation - Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar: March 23, 2021

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the March 23, 2021 ASWM Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar: Building State and Tribal Wetland Program Regulatory Capacity: Findings from ASWM’s Multi-year Project

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Capacity Building webinar “Building State and Tribal Wetland Program Regulatory Capacity: Findings from ASWM’s Multi-year Project” on Tuesday, March 23, 2021 from 3:00-4:30pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:Non-Member Certificate

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series

s2019 Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series

Please check back for future Compensatory Mitigation Webinars. Thank you.


To View More Information and a List of Compensatory Mitigation Webinar, click here.

To View Past 2019 Compensatory Mitigation Webinar Series, 
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2019 Hot Topics Webinars

A Legal Analysis of the Clean Water Act § 401 Proposed Rule

Held Friday, September 20, 2019 - 3:00-5:00 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

On Thursday, August 22, 2019, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed rule for changes to Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 401 was published in the Federal Register. The EPA has only provided a 60-day public comment period - comments are due on or before Monday, October 21, 2019 – however, EPA has requested feedback on over 130 questions. CWA § 401 is a direct grant of authority to states (and tribes that have been approved for “treatment as a state” status) to review for compliance with appropriate federal, state, and tribal water quality requirements any proposed activity that requires a federal license or permit and may result in a discharge to waters of the United States. The proposed rule has significant legal and policy implications for states’ rights to protect their water quality within their own boundaries. To assist states, tribes and others in understanding the potential legal concerns surrounding the proposed rule, ASWM has invited three of the nation’s top Clean Water Act attorneys to provide a history of significant court cases regarding § 401, its use by states and tribes, and a legal analysis of the proposed rule and potential impacts.

Royal C. Gardner
Gardner provided a history of state water quality certification provisions, beginning with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1970. He discussed the key U.S. Supreme Court cases that interpret Clean Water Act Section 401 (PUD No. 1 of Jefferson County v. Washington Department of Ecology and S.D. Warren Co. v. Maine Board of Environmental Protection), as well as other cases mentioned in the proposed rulemaking. He will also highlight significant aspects of the proposed rule: time limitations on state certification decisions; restrictions on the scope of what states may consider in the certification process; and federal agency review (and possible rejection) of state certification decisions.

Mark A. Ryan
Mark discussed the administrative process EPA is required to follow to promulgate a final rule, how the likely litigation will play out and the possibility of Congress invoking the Congressional Review Act. Mark also discussed how this effort fits into other CWA reform efforts by the Trump administration.

James M. McElfish, Jr.
James discussed the reliance by many states on 401 as a basis for wetlands regulatory programs; the various types of conditions that states have applied to 401 certifications to protect water quality in the context of federal licenses and permits and what limitations the proposed rule would place on such conditions; and the potential impacts of the proposed rule on enforceability of state conditions.

BIOS

Royal C. GardnerRoyal C. Gardner is Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law. He is an internationally recognized expert in wetland law and policy. Recent projects include serving as the Chair of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, testifying before a World Bank arbitration panel, advising the Government of Oman regarding wetland policy, and coauthoring amicus briefs on behalf of environmental scientists. In WOTUS-related litigation, he has filed amicus briefs in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and in the U.S. District Courts for the District of North Dakota and the Southern District of New York.

Mark RyanMark Ryan is an Attorney with Ryan & Kuehler PLLC in Winthrop, Washington where he has a national and regional practice that focuses on Clean Water Act (CWA) counseling and litigation, water rights and land-use issues. Prior to Ryan & Kuehler, Mr. Ryan spent 24 years as an EPA trial attorney, where he was one of EPA's leading experts on the CWA. He has published and spoken extensively on the CWA, and he is the long-standing editor of the American Bar Association’s Clean Water Act Handbook. He received his B.S. in natural resources from the University of Michigan and his law degree from Indiana University School of Law (cum laude), where he was an editor of the Indiana Law Journal. Mr. Ryan's Clean Water Act Blog, where he provides summaries of recent developments under the CWA, can be viewed at ryankuehler.com. Mr. Ryan can be reached at .

James M. McElfishJames M. McElfish, Jr. is a Senior Attorney; Director with the Environmental Law Institute Sustainable Use of Land Program.
Jim McElfish’s research focuses on development choices and their links to land use, water resources, biological diversity, and infrastructure policy. ELI’s Sustainable Use of Land Program makes connections among laws, policies, taxes, investments, and land use decisions. His work includes research on coastal zone activities, renewable energy siting, enforcement, and conservation outcomes. McElfish served as representative of the natural environment on the American Planning Association’s multi-year Growing Smarter Legislative Guidebook Directorate. McElfish also leads ELI programs on water resources, examining how watersheds and resources can be evaluated, used, conserved, and restored. He is a nationally recognized authority on NEPA and a former litigator in private practice and with the Department of the Interior. McElfish has been an ELI Senior Attorney since 1986.

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers Presenter: Royal C. Gardner, Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy, Stetson University College of Law

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Part 2: Presenters: James M. McElfish, Jr., Senior Attorney, Environmental Law Institute and Mark A. Ryan, Principal, Ryan & Kuehler PLLC

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Part 3: Questions/Answers

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Indigenous Perspectives on Wetland Science and Management

Held Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern

SPONSORED BY:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

INTRODUCTION

William Dooley, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERSPresenters

  • Todd Mitchell, Swinomish Tribe 
  • Ryan Emanuel, Ph.D. of North Carolina State University [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABSTRACTS

Todd Mitchell & Nicole Casper, Swinomish Tribe
Using Traditional Ecological Knowledge to Protect Wetlands: The Swinomish Tribe’s Wetlands Cultural Assessment Project

Traditional wetland physical assessments do not adequately identify tribal cultural values of wetlands and thus are not adequately protecting cultural uses. The Swinomish Wetlands Cultural Assessment Project has developed a cultural module that can be incorporated into wetland assessments to better inform wetland protections. Local native knowledge was gathered about the traditional uses of 99 plant species. A cultural module was developed based on the presence of plants in several use categories including: construction, ceremonial, subsistence, medicinal, common use, plant rarity, and place of value for each wetland. The combined score of the cultural and physical modules provides an overall wetland score that relates to proscribed buffer protection widths through the Tribe’s wetland protection law. We hope this innovative method can serve as a model in combining traditional cultural values with scientific methods to help promote the breadth of knowledge our ancestors possessed into modern practical environmental protection.

Ryan Emanuel, North Carolina State University
Water in the Lumbee World: Challenges and opportunities to protecting a culturally significant river and its wetlands in an era of rapid environmental change

The Lumbee (or Lumber) River is a culturally important blackwater stream for the 60,000-member Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. The river, its tributaries, and their adjacent swamps have protected and sustained Lumbee people and their ancestors for countless generations in the Coastal Plain of present-day North Carolina. Recent years have experienced renewal of cultural practices associated with water, the river, and wetlands among Lumbee people, but climate change and development pose threats to culturally-important wetlands and riverine ecosystems. I highlight some of these cultural practices and discuss recent research efforts to assess various threats. I also discuss key public policy tools available to Lumbee people and their tribal government for the protection of cultural landscapes while highlighting the challenges of leveraging policy as a non-federally recognized American Indian tribe. The discussion included recommendations for wetland managers and decision-makers who interact with American Indian tribes and Indigenous groups.

BIOS 

Todd A. Mitchell, swəlítub, a Swinomish Tribal citizen, is the Director of the Swinomish Department of Environmental Protection. He graduated from Dartmouth College (BA, Earth Sciences & Film Studies) and Washington State University (MS, Geology) specializing in hydrogeology, igneous petrology and geochemistry. Todd works for Swinomish as a geologist and indigenous scientist researching the Tribe's water resources including traditional ecological knowledge, tidelands, surface water, groundwater, wetlands, and salmon habitat restoration research.

Ryan E. Emanuel is an Associate Professor and University Faculty Scholar in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. He is an enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe. Emanuel studies fresh water and biogeochemical cycles in a wide range of upland and wetland environments using fieldwork, modeling, and geospatial analysis. He has published more than 40 peer-reviewed articles on topics ranging from hydrology and ecology to environmental history and policy. Emanuel serves on the environmental justice committee of the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs and works with tribal governments in North Carolina on topics related to the environment, education, and energy. He holds a BS in Geology from Duke University and graduate degrees (MS, PhD) in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia.

Play

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers

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Part 2: Presenter: Todd Mitchell, Swinomish Tribe

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Part 3: Presenter: Ryan Emanuel, Ph.D. of North Carolina State University

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American Wetlands Month Webinar: Can We Keep Up with Changing Estuaries? Moving from Science to Action in San Francisco Bay

Held Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT

SPONSORED BY:

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTER

ABSTRACT

The scientists, managers, regulators and restoration experts of the San Francisco Bay shore have been working to proactively plan for our future estuary.  Over 200 people in this community contributed to a science synthesis of how to restore and maintain valuable tidal marshes, given that current models predict they will "drown" over time.  This effort was followed by a regional analysis of nature-based approaches to protect the shoreline, with place-specific mapping for every segment of hundreds of miles of the coast.  The approach and conceptual models were designed to be applicable elsewhere, and may be scalable models for other regions.

BIO

Letitia Grenier co-directs SFEI's Resilient Landscapes Program. She is the science lead for the 2015 State of the Estuary Report (a SF Estuary Partnership project) and the 2015 update to the Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals (a California Coastal Conservancy project), heading a team of over 200 environmental scientists, managers, and regulators to develop science­ based recommendations for restoring and maintaining the health the Bay's tidal wetlands in the face of rising sea levels and other stressors. Letitia holds a PhD in Conservation Biology from the University of California at Berkeley and has previously worked on investigating bioaccumulation of contaminants in estuarine food webs, the condition of California’s wetlands, and other ecological questions about the Bay and Delta. Her focus now is to work with partners to conserve California's living resources by developing landscape-­scale, collaborative, science ­based visions and solutions.

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Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: J. Letitia Grenier, PhD, San Francisco Estuary Institute

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Part 2: Presenter: J. Letitia Grenier, PhD, San Francisco Estuary Institute

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Part 3: Questions/Answers

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Held Wednesday, April 3, 2019

AttendeesPRESENTATIONS

Integrated Wetland and Stormwater Program

    • Brian Wolff, Surface Water, Operations and Enforcement Branch Chief, Indiana Department of Environmental Management

Incorporating Wetlands into Reservoir Rehabilitation Projects for Fisheries and Other Benefits in Nebraska

    • Ted LaGrange, Wetland Program Manager, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

Addressing Barriers to Integration of Ecosystem Service Data into Wetland Management Programs

    • Elizabeth Byers, Senior Wetland Scientist, West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection

BIOS

Brian Wolff serves as the Branch Chief of Surface Water, Enforcement, and Operations for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. The branch covers Wetlands, Stormwater, MS4’s, as well as enforcement cases and operational duties for all of the water quality division. Prior to joining Water Quality, Brian served 10 years as manager of the Special Projects Section in the Office of Air Quality, and for 5 years evaluated risk assessments in the Office of Land Quality. Brian has a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Indiana University.

Ted Lagrange has worked as the Wetland Program Manager for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission for 25 years. As Wetland Program Manager he works on a wide variety of wetland issues throughout Nebraska including partnerships, private land restoration programs, public lands management, research, regulations, and outreach. Prior to moving to Nebraska, he worked for 8 years as a Waterfowl Research Technician for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Ted received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Wildlife Biology from Iowa State University. His professional interests are in prairie wetlands and waterfowl/waterbird ecology.

Elizabeth Byers M.S., is a Senior Wetland Scientist with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP). Her current project at WVDEP is developing a combined field and automated-GIS protocol for rapidly assessing the functions of wetlands, which is currently nearing regulatory rollout. Ms. Byers’ education includes an undergraduate degree in Geology from Brown University, Master’s in Hydrology from New Mexico Tech, and additional graduate work in ecology at Oregon State University. Prior to joining state government, Ms. Byers worked for 20 years with non-profits as an ecologist and conservationist in the Himalayas, East African rift, Rocky Mountains, and Appalachians.

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Presenter: Brian Wolff, Surface Water, Operations and Enforcement Branch Chief, Indiana Department of Environmental Management

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Presenter: Ted LaGrange, Wetland Program Manager, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

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Presenter: Elizabeth Byers, Senior Wetland Scientist, West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection

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Waters of the U.S.: Interpreting Geographical, State Program and Legal Impacts of Past, Current and Future Definitions

Held Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. Eastern

INTRODUCTION

ABSTRACT

On December 11, 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (the agencies) signed the proposed “Revised Definition of ‘Waters of the United States’” rule. The agencies’ proposal is the second step in a two-step process to review and revise the definition of “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS) consistent with the February 2017 Presidential Executive Order entitled “Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the ‘Waters of the United States’ Rule.” Interpreting the potential impacts of a revised definition is no easy task, especially given the diversity of aquatic systems and landscapes across the nation, the tremendous diversity of state wetland and water resource programs, the incongruous Supreme Court decisions of the past, and the multiple legal challenges that could potentially continue far into the future.

PRESENTERS

  • Andy Robertson, Executive Director of Geospatial Services at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, will share the results of a project that examines the spatial extent of wetlands and waters that are protected or unprotected under three different Waters of the US definitions; one based on the 2015 Clean Water Rule and two others based on Supreme Court decisions that narrow the scope of federally protected waters. This presentation will also demonstrate the use of ESRI Story Map technology as a communication tool for presenting spatial, text and graphic data to technical and non-technical audiences. [POWERPIONT PRESENTATION]
  • Les Lemm, Wetlands Section Manager for the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources will present on the relationship of the WOTUS rule to Section 404 assumption, its likely effect in Minnesota, and some perspectives from staff with stand-alone state programs. [POWERPIONT PRESENTATION]
  • Royal Gardner, Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law, will discuss the legal landscape: an overview of past cases that have influenced the various definitions of WOTUS, an update on current WOTUS-related litigation, and a preview of expected future WOTUS legal challenges. [POWERPIONT PRESENTATION]

BIOS

Andy RobertsonAndy Robertson is currently Executive Director of GeoSpatial Services at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. In this role, Andy is responsible for oversight and management of all GeoSpatial Services projects, activities and staff. GeoSpatial Services is engaged in a wide variety of projects across the Lower 48 and Alaska including: wetland inventory; National Hydrography Dataset updates; spatial data development; and, natural resource condition assessments. Andy earned a Forest Technology Diploma from Sault College of Applied Technology in Ontario, Canada, a B.Sc. in Environmental Science from the University of Waterloo and completed postgraduate work in forest management at the University of Toronto. GeoSpatial Services has been a key partner of the USFWS and has been working for over 15 years to update legacy National Wetland Inventory data across the nation. Andy is a steering committee member for the ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium and is co-chair of the Alaska GeoSpatial Council Wetland Technical Working Group.

Les LemmLes Lemm is the Wetlands Section Manager for the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. He is responsible for overseeing implementation of the State Wetland Conservation Act, Minnesota’s comprehensive wetland protection law, including a robust wetland banking program. He has a variety of other experience, including working as a charter boat captain on Minnesota’s Lake of the Woods, a natural resource consultant, and the District Manager for the Lake of the Woods Soil and Water Conservation District. Les has a Bachelor’s degree in Natural Resource Management from the University of Minnesota and a Master’s degree in Resource Economics from North Dakota State University.

Royal C. GardnerRoyal C. Gardner is Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law. He is an internationally recognized expert in wetland law and policy. Recent projects include serving as the Chair of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, testifying before a World Bank arbitration panel, advising the Government of Oman regarding wetland policy, and coauthoring amicus briefs on behalf of environmental scientists. In WOTUS-related litigation, he has filed amicus briefs in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and in the U.S. District Courts for the District of North Dakota and the Southern District of New York.

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Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers

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Part 2: Presenter: Andy Robertson, Executive Director of Geospatial Services at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

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Part 3: Presenter: Les Lemm, Wetlands Section Manager for the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources

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Part 4: Presenter: Royal Gardner, Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law

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Part 5: Questions/Answers

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View Past Hot Topics Webinars Here

View a List of Past Hot Topics Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Hot Topics Webinars Here

2020 Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinars

Filling Wetland Regulatory Gaps: Approaches and Lessons Learned

Held Friday, November 13, 2020 - 2:00 pm-4:00 pm Eastern 


INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

This webinar discussed the reasons that regulatory gaps emerge and some of their drivers. Not all states are the same, so the first presentation explores these gaps and options for developing wetland regulatory programs or program elements to fill them. The webinar covered different regulatory regimes at various levels of government. The webinar then move on to examples of wetland regulatory building work in three states (Washington State, Maryland and Kentucky). States shared their regulatory capacity building experiences, explore their drivers for change, what gaps needed to be filled, and the processes they undertook internally to make decisions about their capacity building efforts. The panelists talked about the resources and conditions that were required to make these changes happen. State panelists discussed their outputs and outcomes, sharing what was created, what it has taken to implement it, and what resulted from their efforts. Each panelist ended by answering whether they were able to fill their regulatory gap.

BIOS

Yvonne ValletteYvonne Vallette is an Aquatic Ecologist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For the last twenty-three years she has worked at EPA Region 10’s Oregon Operations Office in Portland serving as the Region’s coordinator for enhancing State and Tribal Programs. Her work with EPA is focused on the technical and policy aspects of the Clean Water Act (CWA), including Section 404. Her practicable experience includes work in: aquatic resource monitoring and assessment, 404 enforcement, compensatory mitigation, impact analysis, CWA jurisdiction, 404 program assumption, and aquatic resources restoration.

Denise ClearwaterDenise Clearwater has worked in Maryland’s wetland programs since 1986. She has a background in developing and implementing programs in wetland regulation, wetland training, and mitigation, as well as managing special projects for grants and program improvement and assisting in policy development. She has represented the Wetlands and Waterways Program in the Maryland Department of the Environment on numerous interagency work groups for regulatory, wetland monitoring, restoration, preservation and stream health and is a past co-chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetland Work Group. She is also a member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. Denise has a B.S. in zoology from the University of Maryland and an M.S. in wildlife management from Frostburg State College (now University).

Richard MrazRichard Mraz is the Wetland Policy Lead for the Washington Department of Ecology. He is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who began his career in the wetlands field in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a naturalist, field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies since 1980. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy.

 
Michelle CookMichelle Cook is an Environmental Scientist with the Division of Water, within the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. In her role as Wetlands Program Coordinator, she oversees the development, validation, and implementation of wetland assessment methodologies including the Kentucky Wetland Rapid Assessment Method (KY-WRAM) and indices of biological integrity. Michelle is part of a team of scientists working to develop water quality standards for Kentucky’s wetlands. She has 10 years of experience in the wetlands monitoring and assessment field and holds a M.S. in Biology from Eastern Kentucky University, and a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Northern Kentucky University.

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Yvonne Vallette, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10

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Part 2: Presenters: Denise Clearwater, Maryland Department of the Environment and Richard Mraz, Washington State Department of Ecology

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Part 3: Presenter: Michelle Cook, Kentucky Division of Water
Questions & Answers

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Improving Enforcement in Wetland Regulatory Programs

Held Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This webinar discussed the need for enforcement mechanisms in wetland regulatory programs. After painting the broader background of need, the webinar shared some of the most common compliance and enforcement tools and their pros, cons and contexts for successful application. The webinar went on to discuss the relationship between states and tribes with the Corps in terms of coordination of enforcement activities. This portion of the webinar explored the different scenarios across the country from the Corps conducting all enforcement in a state to working to actively coordinate state enforcement with multiple districts. The webinar concluded with details about how to build enforcement capacity at the state/tribal level through Wetland Program Plans, specifically how these planning activities can develop systems or be designed to include enforcement in the future.

BIO

Yvonne Vallette, EPA Region 10 Yvonne Vallette is an Aquatic Ecologist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For the last twenty-three years she has worked at EPA Region 10’s Oregon Operations Office in Portland serving as the Region’s coordinator for enhancing State and Tribal Programs. Her work with EPA is focused on the technical and policy aspects of the Clean Water Act (CWA), including Section 404. Her practicable experience includes work in: aquatic resource monitoring and assessment, 404 enforcement, compensatory mitigation, impact analysis, CWA jurisdiction, 404 program assumption, and aquatic resources restoration.   

Stacia Bax, Missouri Department of Natural Resources Stacia Bax is the Environmental Supervisor of the Stormwater and Certification Unit within the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Stacia has nearly 20 years of experience with the department in various areas related to the water program and state parks, with the past 10+ years working with Section 401. For the past 7.5 years, Stacia has coordinated quarterly department-wide wetland meetings, which has helped in the development of the Wetland Program Plan document. 

ara Slater, Oregon Department of Environmental QualitySara Slater is the 401 Water Quality Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Prior to her work at Oregon DEQ, Sara served as Project Manager for Environmental Services Drainage utility in the City of Killeen, Texas. Her other experience includes serving as a program manager for Indiana State Department of Agriculture and Wetlands Project Manager at the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. Sara earned her MS in Geology from Purdue University in Indiana.

 

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Yvonne Vallette, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10

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Part 2: Presenters: Yvonne Vallette, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 and Stacia Bax, Missouri Department of Natural Resources

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Part 3: Presenter: Sara Slater, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
Questions & Answers

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Conducting State/Tribal Review of the 2020 Nationwide Permits

Held Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 3:00pm-5:00 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

  • David Olson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION] Timeline
  • Panel of State Wetland Program Managers
    • Dave Davis, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
    • Richard Mraz, Washington State Department of Ecology

ABSTRACT

September 15th and the 60-day review period clock has started ticking. Nationwide Permits (NWPs) authorize certain activities under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is reissuing its existing NWPs and associated general conditions and definitions, with some modifications, as well as five new NWPs. The Corps is requesting comment on all aspects of these proposed nationwide permits. To view the Nationwide Permits in the Federal Register, go here.

This fifth webinar in ASWM’s Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar Series has been developed to help reviewers understand the content of the newly published Nationwides, options in the review process, and considerations related to specific proposed changes. David Olson from the Corps reviewed each of the proposed changes to the general conditions and introduce the five proposed new NWPs. After this content review, he was joined by state panelists who shared their approaches to the review process, specific elements of the proposed changes on which they are planning to comment, and lessons learned from their reviewing experiences in the past. The webinar ended with an opportunity for participants to ask the panel questions.

BIOS

Dave OlsonDavid Olson is a Regulatory Program Manager at the Headquarters office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He has worked for the Corps since 1991, beginning as a Regulatory Project Manager at the Baltimore District, evaluating applications for Department of the Army authorization to do work in waters and wetlands. In 2002, he began working at his current position at Corps Headquarters. His focus areas currently include wetland and stream restoration, the Corps’ nationwide permit program, and Endangered Species Act compliance for Department of the Army permits.

Dave DavisDave Davis is the Director of the Office of Wetlands & Stream Protection at the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. In this position, he is responsible for Virginia’s independent nontidal wetland regulatory program, non-regulatory wetland programs, and surface water investigation programs. He is DEQ’s lead technical expert on wetland science issues, drafts regulations and guidance on State wetland policy, serves as the liaison with federal agencies regarding 404/401 issues, and manages several federally-funded wetland grants. Prior to joining DEQ in 2001, Dave was a partner in a wetland consulting firm in Richmond. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology (Music minor) from The College of William & Mary and a Master of Environmental Studies degree in Environmental Policy and Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist and a Virginia Certified Professional Wetland Delineator.

Rick MrazRichard Mraz is the Wetland Policy Lead for the Washington Department of Ecology. He is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who began his career in the wetlands field in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a naturalist, field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies since 1980. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy.

 

 

 

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: David Olson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 2: Presenter: David Olson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Part 3: Panel: Dave Davis, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and Richard Mraz, Washington State Department of Ecology

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Communications Strategies and Lessons Learned for Wetland Programs

Held Thursday, August 20, 2020 - 3:00-5:00 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

 PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This webinar shared communication strategies and examples of their use in practice to strengthen wetland regulatory programs. Participants learned how various techniques can be employed in real-world contexts. Examples included strategies to gather input and build support for new or changing regulations, to work through stakeholder engagement activities, and to improve awareness of and compliance with new requirements. This webinar shared examples from three states actively engaged in this communications work. Presenters shared lessons learned and advice on how to think through and implement this work, as well as insights about common challenges.

BIOS

Alison RogersonAlison Rogerson works for the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program which assesses the health of Delaware’s tidal and non-tidal wetlands, investigates shoreline stabilization and wetland restoration methods, and creates usable products to inform and teach stakeholders. Alison has been with DNREC for 12 years and has experience combining wetland science and research with outreach and education to strengthen wetland management and protection in Delaware.

Laura LapierreLaura Lapierre, PWS, NHCWS is the Program Manager of the Vermont Wetlands Program for the VT Department of Environmental Conservation and has held this role for nearly 7 years. At VT DEC, Laura is responsible for the management and protection of Vermont’s wetlands through the program’s implementation of the Vermont Wetland Rules, wetland bioassessment projects, wetland restoration work, and aiding in the development of state wetland policy. Laura has a Master’s Degree in Biology from McGill University.

Mary Ann TiltonMary Ann Tilton is the Assistant Wetlands Bureau Administrator with the State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services (NHDES), Wetlands Bureau. She has been with NHDES for over 30 years in various management and supervisory positions. She helped develop the Wetlands Enforcement program and supervised wetlands compliance for 17 years. She has served as the Assistant Administrator since 2005 and oversees state wetlands rules development, program development, and wetlands permitting. She is the recipient of an EPA Merit Award (2019) for development of a Wetlands BMP, multi-year rules initiative, and development of stream crossing rules. She holds a BA degree in Botany and Zoology from Connecticut College, MS in Zoology from University of Rhode Island, and a JD from UNH Law School (formerly Franklin Pierce Law Center), and is a Professional Wetland Scientist (PWS) and member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. She lives with her family in Concord, NH and enjoys hiking in the White Mountains, skiing, and exploring arboretums. 

 

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Alison Rogerson, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

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Part 2: Laura Lapierre, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation

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Part 3: Mary Ann Tilton, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

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Building Capacity to Protect and Manage Wetlands through the Development of State Wetland Associations

Held Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACTS

This webinar shared how states and tribes can partner with or encourage the development of state wetland associations to enhance the capacity of states and tribes to protect their wetlands. State associations can be valuable partners with states and tribes on a range of activities, ranging from restoration activities and monitoring and assessment to stimulating financial investments and assisting with education and outreach. This webinar shared the experiences of the Wisconsin Wetland Association and the Carolinas Wetland Association, while also sharing some of the interesting connections states have with other associations. The webinar included basic information about what state wetland associations are, what roles they play, lessons learned by two example associations and some lessons learned to help those interested in forming a new state wetland association. The webinar included presentations by both associations, followed by a panel session and Q&A with webinar participants.

BIOS

Erin O'Brien, Wisconsin Wetlands AssociationErin O’Brien is the Policy Programs Director for the Wisconsin Wetlands Association (WWA). Since 2004, Erin has overseen the implementation and expansion of WWA's government relations work including lobbying, legislator education, regulatory oversight, local government outreach, and EPA funded wetland program development collaborations with university and municipal partners. Erin has a Master’s degree in Land Resources from University of Wisconsin-Madison. WWA recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. A timeline of its history can be found at Wisconsinwetlands.org/50years. 

Rick SavageRick Savage formed the Carolina Wetlands Association nonprofit in 2015 to maintain a public focus on the value of wetlands. He serves as the organization's president. Currently, Carolina Wetlands Association is working with communities to restore wetlands, create community resilience and environmental equity, to mitigate climate change effects and provide additional co-benefits in terms of ecosystem services. Prior to his work with the Carolina Wetlands Association, Rick worked for the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources in the Division of Water Quality, doing wetlands monitoring research for EPA. Rick worked with EPA scientists and other state scientists to develop the sampling protocols and coordinated regional assessment efforts for the National Wetland Condition Assessment. Rick has an MS in Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech and an MS in Natural Resource Management.

Kim MatthewsKim Matthews is the current Vice-President and founding board member of the volunteer-based non-profit organization, the Carolina Wetlands Association. She is also the chair of the Development Committee focusing on outreach, communication, and fundraising. Kim graduated with a B.S. in Biology from Wittenberg University. She received her M.S. in Forestry from North Carolina State University. She has over
20 years of experience in wetland ecology, stormwater management, and watershed assessments. She is currently an environmental scientist with RTI, International where she provides technical support and assistance to federal and state environmental agencies.

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Erin O'Brien, Wisconsin Wetlands Association

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Part 2: Presenters: Rick Savage, Carolina Wetlands Association and Kim Matthews, Carolina Wetlands Association

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Part 3: Panel Questions

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Sharing EPA's "Refresh" to the Enhancing State and Tribal Programs (ESTP) Framework

Held Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 3-5:00 pm ET

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION] 

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This webinar shared information on forthcoming updates to the EPA’s Enhancing State and Tribal Programs (ESTP) Framework. EPA’s ESTP Framework is designed to enhance EPA's delivery of technical and financial support for state and tribal wetlands programs. The overall objective of the ESTP initiative is to accelerate program development on a national scale.

The webinar provided a brief introduction and background on EPA’s ESTP Initiative and how it relates to wetland program planning and capacity building efforts. The webinar then move to presentations on the “refreshes” being made in each of the four core element areas addressed in the ESTP Framework: 1) wetland monitoring and assessment, 2) wetland regulation, 3) wetland water quality standards, and 4) voluntary wetland restoration and protection. The webinar encourages states and tribes to utilize the framework as a planning tool to build state and tribal wetland program capacity. The webinar ended with an invitation for state and tribal wetland staff to participate in ASWM’s capacity building National Dialogues and an overview of ASWM resources around this topic. 

BIOS

Rebecca Dils, EPARebecca Dils is a long-time employee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has worked as a regional and state liaison in numerous programs including Toxic Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know, State & Local Comparative Risk, Coalition to Restore Urban Waterways, and Indiana’s Center for Urban Policy and the Environment. One of her favorite projects was being a team leader for the Conservation Core and At-Risk Youth Environmental Program in Richmond, California. She is currently working on the ESTP Wetlands Program with a zeal for the Voluntary Restoration & Protection Core Element.

Mike McDavit, EPAMichael McDavit is currently the Chief of the Program Development and Jurisdiction Branch, Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His unit oversees “Waters of the US” jurisdictional matters under the Clean Water Act and administers technical/financial assistance for enhancing state and tribal aquatic resource programs. His team is currently working on a number of rulemaking projects, including Waters of the US (WOTUS) definition rulemaking, state and tribal 404 permitting regulations, and guidance/regulation on the section 401 water quality certification process. Mike holds a BS in Environmental Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay and a MPA from The George Washington University. His 37-year federal career has spanned many environmental functions, including regulation of pesticides, management of hazardous waste, and air and water pollution control.

Kerryann Weaver, EPAKerryann Weaver is an Environmental Scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Region 5 Office in Chicago. She works in the Watersheds and Wetland Branch of the Water Division. Kerryann is involved with Clean Water Act Section 404 permit review and enforcement, as well as wetland mitigation banking, wetland program contract and grant review and management. Kerryann managed the development of the Wetland Supplement.

 Yvonne ValletteYvonne Vallette is an Aquatic Ecologist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For the last twenty-three years she has worked at EPA Region 10’s Oregon Operations Office in Portland serving as the Region’s coordinator for enhancing State and Tribal Programs. Her work with EPA is focused on the technical and policy aspects of the Clean Water Act (CWA), including Section 404. Her practicable experience includes work in: aquatic resource monitoring and assessment, 404 enforcement, compensatory mitigation, impact analysis, CWA jurisdiction, 404 program assumption, and aquatic resources restoration.

Eliodora Chamberlain Dr. Eliodora Chamberlain graduated with a B.S. in Zoology from the University of California, Davis. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in Wildlife Behavior and Physiological Ecology from the University of Missouri-Columbia in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences and the USGS Fish and Wildlife Cooperative Research Extension Unit.

After working 17 years in wildlife research, US Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA Forest Service, she started working for the US EPA Region 7 in 2005. She works in the Watersheds and Grants Branch in the Water Division as a Wetlands and Streams Biologist and wears several hats. She is the Lead Regional Coordinator for ESTP & NWCA, and is the Regional Team Leader for the CWA 404 Regulatory section.

When she is not working for the EPA, she is a Canine Search Specialist with FEMA’s Missouri Task Force 1 Urban Search and Rescue Canine Team, a FEMA K9 Lead Evaluator, and a FEMA K9 Instructor. She currently has a FEMA certified disaster search and rescue dog, Phoenix, and is currently training her pup, Raven, to be a future FEMA disaster search and rescue dog.

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Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Rebecca Dils, EPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds 

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Part 2: Presenters: Kerryann Weaver, EPA Region 5 and Yvonne Vallette, EPA Region 10

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Part 3: Presenters: Eliodora Chamberlain, EPA Region 7 and Rebecca Dils, EPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds 

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Introduction to Wetland Program Plans (WPPs)

Held Friday, February 21, 2020 - 3:00-5:00 pm EST 

INTRODUCTION

Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This first webinar in ASWM’s Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar Series focused on the use of Wetland Program Plans (WPPs) as a tool that can help states and tribes identify and plan capacity building efforts. WPPs focus on four core elements – wetland regulation, wetland monitoring and assessment, wetland water quality standards, and voluntary wetland restoration, but can include other efforts as well. In the first presentation, the webinar shared how WPPs can be used as one of (many) different capacity building tools and explain the components and expectations around their development. Next, the webinar shared examples of two state WPPs, each taking a different approach to fulfilling the required elements of a WPP. The webinar shares additional benefits of WPPs, including improved coordination with partners, measurable objectives to guide and track ongoing work and access to funding sources, including EPA Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs). The webinar concluded with an invitation to engage in ASWM’s national dialogues and share upcoming project resources that may be useful to states and tribes seeking to build the capacity of their wetland programs.

BIOS

Yvonne ValletteYvonne Vallette is an Aquatic Ecologist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For the last twenty-three years she has worked at EPA Region 10’s Oregon Operations Office in Portland serving as the Region’s coordinator for enhancing State and Tribal Programs. Her work with EPA is focused on the technical and policy aspects of the Clean Water Act (CWA), including Section 404. Her practicable experience includes work in: aquatic resource monitoring and assessment, 404 enforcement, compensatory mitigation, impact analysis, CWA jurisdiction, 404 program assumption, and aquatic resources restoration.

Rick MrazRick Mraz is the Wetland Policy Lead for the Washington Department of Ecology. He is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who began his career in the wetlands field in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a naturalist, field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies since 1980. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy

Stacia BaxStacia Bax is the Environmental Supervisor of the Stormwater and Certification Unit within the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Stacia has nearly 20 years of experience with the department in various areas related to the water program and state parks, with the past 10+ years working with Section 401. For the past 7.5 years, Stacia has coordinated quarterly department-wide wetland meetings, which has helped in the development of the Wetland Program Plan document. 

  

 

 

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Yvonne Vallette, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7

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Part 2: Presenter: Stacia Bax, Missouri Department of Natural Resources

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Part 3: Presenters: Richard Mraz, Washington State Department of Ecology and Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers

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View Past Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinars Here

View a List of Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar Recordings Here

a Certificate of Participation for the February 21, 2020 Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Project Webinar: Introduction to Wetland Program Plans (WPPs)

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the February 21, 2020 Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Project Webinar: Introduction to Wetland Program Plans (WPPs)

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Capacity Building webinar: Introduction to Wetland Program Plans (WPPs) on Friday, February 21, 2020 from 3:00-5:00 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation for ASWM Members' Webinar - February 24, 2021

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the February 24, 2021 ASWM Members’ Webinar: State Climate Action Plans: How Maine and Wisconsin Created a Path Toward Resiliency

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Members' webinar: “State Climate Action Plans: How Maine and Wisconsin Created a Path Toward Resiliency” on Wednesday, February 24, 2021 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:Non-Member Certificate

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Publications

ASWM PublicationsThe Association conducts research and publishes reports, guidebooks, news articles, brochures, white papers, and summaries of findings of symposia and workshops. These are available electronically to all interested individuals and organizations.

New Features & Publications 2014-2015

ASWM Board Meeting Minutes

Below are the ASWM Board Meeting Minutes to date.