The Association of State Wetland Managers is a nonprofit membership organization established in 1983 to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources, to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts and to provide training and education for our members and the public. Membership is open to anyone who is involved with wetland resources.

Past Stream Identification/Delineation/Mitigation Project

 

2014 


Thursday, June 19
, 2014
2:00 pm-4:00 p.m. EDT

Key Findings from ASWM's National Report on State Definitions, Jurisdiction and Mitigation Requirements in State Programs for Ephemeral, Intermittent and Perennial Streams in the United States Brenda Zollitsch, PhD, Policy Analyst, ASWM

Brenda Zollitsch, PhD, Policy Analyst, ASWMThis ASWM Member’s Webinar presented key findings from our two-year project to document the status of and trends in stream identification, delineation and mitigation practices for ephemeral, intermittent and perennial streams across the United States.  The webinar presented highlights from the study’s comparative analysis, which was based on in-depth interviews with state staff from 47 states.  The webinar presented findings on how stream impacts are integrated into state dredge and fill and 401 certification programs, information about stream identification and assessment methods, and practices for mitigating stream alteration and degradation. The study finds substantial variability in the terms and methods used by states and provides a valuable snapshot of practices and where they are trending at this time of rapid growth in mitigation programs and practices. This project was funded by a U.S. EPA Wetland Program Grant and the McKnight Foundation.

        

Part 1: Introduction:
Marla Stelk, ASWM
Presenter: Brenda
Zollitsch, PhD, Policy
Analyst, ASWM
  Part 2: Brenda Zollitsch,
PhD, Policy Analyst,
ASWM
  Part 3: Brenda Zollitsch, 
PhD, Policy Analyst, 
ASWM
         
     
Part 4: Brenda Zollitsch, 
PhD, Policy Analyst, 
ASWM
  Part 5: Questions/
Discussion
   
         



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Thursday, May 22, 2014 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern, 1:00 Central, 12:00 Mountain, and 11:00 Pacific

 

Introduction Jeanne Christie, ASWM

Special Topic – Mitigating for Ditches and Altered/Modified Streams

Webinar Description: This webinar will build on findings on the mitigation of ditches and altered/modified streams from ASWM’s recent research on state stream identification, delineation and mitigation across the United States.  To address this timely and complex issue, we have pulled together a panel to share with you and discuss some of the different approaches to mitigating impacts to ditches and altered/modified streams.  We will begin with a brief summary of findings on mitigation for ditches and modified/altered streams from the recent ASWM Stream Report.  Next, we will hear panel presentations on mitigation requirements, what counts as mitigation and how debits/credits are assigned for ditches/modified streams in New Jersey, Virginia and Tennessee.  Finally, we will provide an opportunity for Q&A with panelists and about findings on ditches and modified/altered streams in the ASWM Stream Report.

Webinar Panelists:

Susan Lockwood & Vincent Mazzei – New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Bettina Sullivan – Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
Vena Jones – Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation

 

     
Part 1: Introduction, 
Jeanne Christie and
Brenda Zollitsch, ASWM

      Part 2: Susan Lockwood and
Vincent Mazzei, New Jersey
Department of Environmental
Protection
                         
     
Part 3: Bettina Sullivan, 
Virginia Department of
Environmental Quality
         Part 4: Vena Jones, 
Tennessee Department
of Environment and
Conservation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thursday, April 17, 2014
 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Introduction Jeanne Christie, ASWM [View Webinar]

Special Topics: Mitigating For Impoundments

Presentation of research on the impacts of impoundments on water quality

Followed by panel presentations by:

 

                
Part I: Introduction,
Jeanne Christie, ASWM
  Part 2: Robby Baker,
Tennessee DEC 
  Part 3: David Goerman,
PA DEP 
 
           
           
Part 4: Stacia Bax, 
MO DNR 
  Part 5: Rusty Wenerick,
SC DHEC 
  Part 6: Questions & 
Answers 
 
           
           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, February 20, 2014 2:00 p.m. EST

Assessment Methodology


March 4-6, 2014

ASWM Annual Meeting


Thursday January 16
, 2014
– 2:30 p.m. EST

Danny Bennett, West Virginia DNR

Introduction Jeanne Christie, ASWM

Learning to "SWVM" (Stream and Wetland Valuation Metric) Danny Bennett, West Virginia Department of Natural Resources

Through the national stream identification, delineation and mitigation project, we have identified a wide range of tools and techniques that may be of interest to other states.  There are a number of different mitigation, assessment and evaluation tools that have been identified through this process.  One tool that has integrated many different elements from other tools has been the West Virginia Stream and Wetland Valuation Metric.

Our January 16th webinar Danny Bennett, of the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources gave a presentation on the history behind creation of the West Virginia Stream and Wetland Valuation Metric, its components and some lessons learned.

Danny Bennett was born and raised in Richmond, Virginia but his family has a long history in West Virginia with roots in the Beckley and Shinnston areas.  After marrying Tina, they packed up and relocated to Knoxville, Tennessee where he attended the University of Tennessee earning his Masters of Science degree working with black bass on Norris Reservoir.  After graduation, he worked as a contractor for the Tennessee Valley Authority conducting IBI surveys in the Clinch/Powell watersheds.  He accepted the position of Coordination Biologist with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources in 1998.  While at WVDNR he has received training in wetland delineation and completed the Rosgen Natural Stream Design courses (I-IV).  His responsibilities include coordinating agency responses to 404/401 permits, commenting on NEPA documentation for projects throughout the state, representing the agency at a variety of meetings/workshops, and he serves on the Interagency Review Team.  He has three very active children.  He coaches his twelve year old son’s baseball team, is an Assistant Scout Master, helps with various church activities, travels with his ten year old daughter to highland dance competitions, is involved in 4-H with his fifteen year old daughter and in his “spare time” enjoys waterfowl hunting with a very stubborn Chesapeake Bay retriever.

2013 [2012]

Thursday, December 19, 2013 2:00 p.m.  EST

Update and Advice on Data Analysis


Morgan Robertson, University of WisconsinThursday, July 25 – 2:00 p.m. EST 

Introduction Jeanne Christie, ASWM [View Webinar]

Science Policy and Outcomes in Developing Stream Compensatory Mitigation Criteria – Morgan Robertson University of Wisconsin, Rebecca Lave, Indiana University and Martin Doyle, Duke University

Our talk highlighted preliminary results of our multidisciplinary NSF-funded research on the policy development and hydrogeomorphic outcomes of compensatory stream mitigation criteria in three different states: Oregon, Ohio and North Carolina.  The presentation was in two parts, with the first focusing on the themes and consistent topics of debate that characterize the creation and adoption of compensatory stream mitigation criteria across our research sites.  In the second part, we discussed our preliminary findings on the geomorphological comparison of stream compensation restoration sites with non-restored sites in North Carolina.

Rebecca Lave, Indiana UniversityMorgan Robertson is an Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2004, and conducted postdoctoral research at the US Environmental Protection Agency developing regulations governing wetland credit markets.  He taught and conducted research at the University of Kentucky from 2007 to 2012.  His research focuses on the interface of science and economics in ecosystem service markets.

Rebecca Lave is an Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Geography at Indiana University.  She has published in journals including Science, Social Studies of Science, Ecological Restoration, and the Journal of the American Water Resources Association. Her new book  “Fields and Streams: Stream Restoration, Neoliberalism, and the Future of Environmental Science (U. Georgia  Press 2012)” analyzes the fight over Dave Rosgen’s Natural Channel Design approach.

Martin Doyle, Duke University

Martin Doyle is Professor of River Science and Policy, with training in hydrology, geomorphology, and engineering. His research is at the interface of science, economics and policy of environmental management and restoration. His background is in hydraulics and sediment transport in rivers, but he also works on river infrastructure, including decommissioning dams and levees, as well as research on financing rehabilitation of aging hydropower dams and the impacts of infrastructure on river ecosystems across the US. He holds a PhD in Earth Science from Purdue University, and a Masters in Environmental Engineering from Ole Miss. His research has resulted in several awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship (2009), a National Science Foundation Early Career Award (2005), the Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers (2004), the Horton Grant from the American Geophysical Union (2001), and the Chorafas Prize from the Chorafas Foundation in Switzerland (2002). For his work in bridging environmental science and policy, in 2009 was named the inaugural Frederick J Clarke Scholar by the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2008 Dr Doyle was named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow by Stanford University, and received a GlaxoSmithKline Faculty Fellowship for Public Policy from the Institute for Emerging Issues. More information on research program, click here

 

          
Part 1: Introduction, Jeanne
Christie, ASWM 
  Part 2   Part 3  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 23 – 2:00 p.m. EST Webinar

Introduction Jeanne Christie, ASWM

How to Use RIBBITS to Understand and Compare Stream Mitigation Banking and in Lieu Fee Practices Around the Country Steve Martin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

              
Part 1: Introduction &
Steve Martin, USACE
      Part 2: Steve Martin,
USACE
     
               
           
Part 3: Steve Martin,
USACE
      Part 4: Steve Martin,
USACE
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Wednesday, March 20 – 1:00-3:45 p.m. EST
Workshop/Webinar

1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  The Ordinary High Water Mark: Concepts, Research, and Applications – Matthew Mersel, U.S. Army Corps Engineer Research and Development Center

1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.  Site Selection and Design for Stream Mitigation – Will Harman, Stream Mechanics

              
Part 1: Will Harman,
Stream Mechanics
    Part 2: Will Harman,
Stream Mechanics
    Part 3: Will Harman,
Stream Mechanics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.  Break

3:15 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Out of Kind Stream Mitigation – Brian Topping, Wetland Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thursday, February 28 – 2:00 p.m. EST
 

Thursday, January 24 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Topic – Western stream identification and delineation methods

Streamflow Duration Assessment Method for the Pacific Northwest, Tracie Nadeau, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The Streamflow Duration Assessment Method for the Pacific Northwest is a scientific tool providing a rapid assessment framework to distinguish between ephemeral, intermittent and perennial streams. It results from empirical design and statistical analysis of field data, and a four year validation study spanning three states (WA, ID, OR) and a diversity of hydrologic landscapes. This presentation will discuss development, validation, and application of the method.

  
Part 1

 

 

 

 

 

 


A Review of Ordinary High Water Mark Research in the Western U.S. and Future Studies
, Matt Mersel, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Delineation of the ordinary high water mark (OHWM) on stream channels can be challenging in light of its vague legal definition and the inherently dynamic nature of stream systems. Inconsistent OHWM delineation practices result in part from an unclear understanding of what the OHWM represents scientifically and a lack of research into the spatial and temporal stability of the physical indicators used to identify the OHWM. This presentation will discuss past and ongoing studies conducted by the U.S. Army Corps Engineer Research and Development Center, aimed at exploring OHWM indicator distribution and reliability in several regions of the country including the Arid Southwest and Western Mountains. Additionally, concepts of the OHWM and potential study designs for future studies in the East and nationally will be discussed.

          
Part 2     Part 3

 

 

 

 

 

 



2012
[July
September October November]

 


Thursday, July 26
2:00 p.m. EST

Thursday, September 27 2:00 p.m. EST

Thursday, October 25 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Topic – North Carolina Stream Mitigation Program – Eric Kulz, North Carolina Division of Water Quality and Todd Tugwell, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wilmington District

                 
Part 1: Intro & History   Part: 2    
         
     
Par:t 3   Part: 4    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Thursday, November 15 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Topic – Natural Channel Design

Functions Lost, Functions Gained: Can Stream Mitigation Work? – Will Harman, Stream Mechanics

               
Part 1     Part 2     Part 3

 

 

 

 

 

 


[Return to top]

[Future Webinars]

 

 

 

Thank You

Thank you for registering for the ASWM Members' Wetland Webinar to be held on January 22, 2013.

You will be sent a confirmation email with a link to register for the upcoming webinar.

If you have any questions, please contact Laura at 207-892-3399 or .

Thank you.

ASWM

Publications

PublicationsThe Association conducts research and publishes reports, guidebooks, news articles, brochures, white papers, and summaries of findings of symposia and workshops. These are available electronically to all interested individuals and organizations.

ASWM Publications

Wetland News Digest

Wetland News (Members' Only)

 

 

ASWM Sign Up

Sign Up InformationSign up to:

Receive information on upcoming ASWM Webinars and our monthly newsletter, Wetland News Digest

SIGN UP HERE

In the News

In the News

Weekly News of Interest

Listed below are links to news articles that may be of interest to the wetland community. They also appear in the monthly issue of Wetland News Digest. Readers are encouraged to send links to recent articles, publications, and other resources pertaining to wetlands in their local area to Stacey Detwiler, Policy Analyst at and reference “In the News” in the subject box.

Senate passes $35 billion clean water infrastructure bill in bipartisan fashion

Got Mud? For Coastal Cities, Humble Dirt Has Become A Hot Commodity

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Announces Nearly $150 Million in Awards for Resilient Infrastructure

Top 5 Frequently Asked Questions About Florida’s Assumption of Clean Water Act 404 Program

Governor eliminates most state protections for Indiana wetlands

What Is Blue Carbon? Definition and Importance

 

Recent Comment Letters

ASWM Provides Feedback on Priorities for the Biden-Harris Administration

ASWM’s Executive Director met with members of the EPA Agency Review Team section of the Biden-Harris Presidential Transition Team on November 19th, 2020 to discuss priorities for Clean Water Act jurisdiction. Following the meeting, the Board of Directors met and crafted a letter outlining recommended priorities for the new Administration on day 1 and the first 100 days, and submitted the final letter to the EPA Agency Review Team on November 30th. ASWM’s letter can be found here.

About ASWM

Mission Statement

The Association of State Wetland Managers is a nonprofit membership organization established in 1983 to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources, to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts, and to provide training and education for our members and the public. ASWM's members and partners include states and tribes, federal agencies, nonprofit partners, wetland professionals, educators, wetland enthusiasts and many others. The main common goal between these groups is a better understanding of wetlands and how to protect the resources throughout the Nation.

Join/Renew ASWM

Slide 1 - copy - copy
JOIN ASWM OR RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP

Help Support Our Nation's Wetlands

  

 

JOIN ASWM NOw
Join ASWM

The Association of State Wetland Managers has a long history of blazing trails in advocating for sound wetland science and sensible water policy. By joining the Association, your membership will allow you to enjoy the many benefits of membership such as our Members’ Webinar Series and free Certificates of Participation (please see the full list of benefits below), take an active role in cultivating this wetland ethic across the nation and support ASWM's projects and services.

If you experience any issues renewing your membership on the website or need a reminder of
your login information, please don't hesitate to call
Laura Burchill at 207-892-3399 or email .

We are pleased that you will be joining the Association of State Wetland Managers as a new or renewing member.

The Association of State Wetland Managers has a long history of blazing trails in advocating for sound wetland science and sensible water policy. By joining the Association, your membership will allow you to enjoy the many benefits of membership such as our Members’ Webinar Series and free Certificates of Participation (please see the full list of benefits below), take an active role in cultivating this wetland ethic across the nation and support ASWM's projects and services.

If you experience any issues renewing your membership on the website or need a reminder of your login information, please don't hesitate to call Laura Burchill at 207-892-3399 or email .

ASWM Benefits of Membership
  1. Free Registration for our Members' Webinar Series (8 per year). Topics alternate between science, policy, and legal issues.
  2. Free Exclusive access to our archive of Members' Webinar recordings. More information can be found here. 
  3. Free Certificates of Participation for all ASWM webinars*
  4. Reduced Rates for Participation in ASWM Meetings, Workshops and Trainings, including ASWM's Annual State/Tribal/Federal Coordination Meeting
  5. Free Subscription to the Association's bi-monthly membership newsletter, Wetland News
  1. Free Subscription to the Association's weekly news bulletin, Insider's Edition
  2. Opportunities for Involvement in ASWM Committees
  3. Voting rights in elections of the Board of Directors and all issues presented to members to vote
  4. Access to a National Network of Wetland Professionals
  5. A Sense of Pride Knowing That You Have Directly Supported Active Wetland Conservation Efforts Nationwide
  6. Corporate group memberships (11-20+ people) also include logo placement on ASWM’s website homepage with a live link

*Non-members pay a $25.00 administrative fee for each requested Certificate of Participation.

Membership Categories and Rates

Government & Non-Profit Organization (NPO) ASWM Membership Categories*

Individual Government/NPO Employee

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 2-5 People

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 6-10 People

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 6-10 People

Three-Year Memberships (any category)

Government/NPO Rates

Government/NPO Rates

$65 (includes membership for 1 person)

$175 (includes membership for 2- 5 people)

$350 (includes membership for 6-10 people)

$550 (includes membership for 11-20 people)

Pay for a full 3 years in advance and enjoy all the benefits of membership at a 5% discount off the current rate.


$65 (includes membership for 1 person)

$175 (includes membership for 2- 5 people)

$350 (includes membership for 6-10 people)

$550 (includes membership for 11-20 people; linked logo on ASWM’s homepage)

Pay for a full 3 years in advance and enjoy all the benefits of membership at a 5% discount off the current rate.

Corporate/Consultant Rates

$85 (includes membership for 1 person)

$250 Corporate (includes membership for 2- 5 people)

$450 Corporate (includes membership for 6-10 people)

$700 Corporate (includes membership for 11-20 people)

Pay for a full 3 years in advance and enjoy all the benefits of membership at a 5%
discount off the current rate.

Corporate/Consultant Rates

$85 (includes membership for 1 person)

$250 (includes membership for 2- 5 people)

$450 (includes membership for 6-10 people)

$700 (includes membership for 11-20 people; linked logo on ASWM’s homepage)

Pay for a full 3 years in advance and enjoy all the benefits of membership at a 5% discount off the current rate.

Corporate/Consultant ASWM Membership Categories

Individual Corporate/Consultant

Corporate group membership for 2-5 people

Corporate group membership for 6-10 people

Corporate group membership for 11-20 people

Three year memberships (any category)

Student & Senior/Retiree Rates

$30 (includes membership for one year)

$30 (includes membership for one year)

Pay for a full 3 years in advance and enjoy all the benefits of membership at a 5% discount off the current rate.

Individual Government/NPO Employee

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 2-5 People

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 6-10 People

Government agency/NPO Group Membership for 6-10 People

Three-Year Memberships (any category)

*Individuals who do not have a government, nonprofit or corporate/consultant affiliation should join using the $65.00 Individual/NPO membership category.

 

Slide 1 - copy - copy

 

 

Who We Are

Who We Are

The Association of State Wetland Managers is a nonprofit membership organization established in 1983 to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources; to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts and to provide training and education for our members and the public.  ASWM's members and partners include states and tribes, federal agencies, nonprofit partners, wetland professionals, educators, wetland enthusiasts and many others. The main common goal between these groups is a better understanding of wetlands and how to protect the resources throughout the Nation.

Read more ...

ASWM Board Members

Officers

Mark Biddle, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

Mark Biddle, Chair

A Delaware native, Mark is a lead wetland scientist with more than 30 years of experience working for the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Currently, Mark is within the Watershed Assessment Section, managing the Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program, and the Watershed Management Program. Mark has a wide background to draw from including involvement in Delaware’s regulatory and permitting responsibilities for tidal wetlands, subaqueous lands, 401 water quality certification, and drafting legislation and regulations for non-tidal wetlands. Mark has worked on the Delaware Wetlands Conservation Strategy, wetland restoration, compensatory mitigation and wetland banking, assessing restored wetlands for nutrient assimilation, serving as team leader for Delaware Whole Basin Management, and on various ecological and green infrastructure initiatives. Mark has participated on statewide and regional planning groups and represents Delaware on national wetland mapping and mitigation issues. Over the years, Mark has assisted in applying, receiving and either authoring or co-authoring 18 multi-year grants for wetland projects in Delaware involving comprehensive plans, mitigation banking, best management practices, mapping techniques, watershed restoration, wetland education, assessment and monitoring. Mark continues to produce reports on status and changes of Delaware wetlands using updated statewide wetland mapping efforts in partnership with the National Wetlands Inventory. Mark holds degrees in Natural Resource Management and Soil and Water Management and attended both Delaware State University and the University of Delaware. Residing in Dover, Delaware, Mark enjoys his time with his two daughters, and hopes that the future holds ample time for two of his other loves, hunting and fishing. 

Jill AspinwallJill Aspinwall, Vice Chair

Jill Aspinwall has worked at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection since 2001. She has a background in watershed management, education and outreach, wetlands mitigation, ecosystem restoration, and policy. For the last five years, Jill has been working in the Office of Policy Implementation assisting in the development and implementation of New Jersey’s land use regulations, including the Freshwater Wetland Protection Act Rules, Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules, and the Coastal Zone Management Rules. Jill manages the State’s In-Lieu Fee Program and has also recently become the lead in the development and management of the New Jersey’s Mitigation Banking Program. She has a B.S. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Washington College, and an M.S. in Environmental Science from Rutgers/NJIT. 

 

Amy Louonds, Michigan Department of Environmental QualityAmy Lounds, Secretary

For the past 7 years, Amy has served as the Wetlands, Lakes and Streams Unit Chief for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. Amy has primary responsibility for implementation and administration of Michigan’s Wetlands Protection and Inland Lakes and Streams laws, and Michigan’s administration of Section 404 of the federal Clean Water Act. Her duties include supervising state-wide staff in the Wetlands, Lakes and Streams Unit, ensuring compliance with federal requirements and state-federal agreements, developing program guidance for staff and the public, and resolving complex and controversial technical and policy issues. Amy has worked for the MDEQ for over 20 years and previously served as the statewide wetland policy specialist and the administrator of the wetland mitigation banking program.

Prior to working for the MDEQ, Amy worked for the Michigan Department of Transportation doing environmental reviews and permit applications for wetlands, inland lakes and streams, and floodplains. Amy has a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from Michigan State University and a Maters in Landscape Architecture and Conservation Biology and Ecosystem Management from the University of Michigan. Amy currently lives in Holt Michigan with her husband and two daughters, and enjoys spending time with her family and being outdoors.

Lauren Driscoll, Washington State Department of EcologyLauren Driscoll, Treasurer

Lauren Driscoll is the Manager of the Wetlands Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology, a position that she has held since 2005. She is responsible for ensuring statewide consistency in the implementation of 401 WQ certifications, technical assistance, and guidance for local wetland regulations. She is responsible for assisting and mentoring wetland technical staff statewide. She oversees the wetland compliance program and writes grants for wetland program activities. Since 2007 she has also served as the agency’s wetland policy lead doing bill analyses and legislative briefings, tracking national issues, and providing guidance on local wetland ordinances and their implementation. Lauren specializes in wetland policy and mitigation options such as wetland banks, ILF and advance mitigation.

Lauren began work at Ecology in 1998 when she was hired to develop a wetland banking rule and establish the state’s bank certification program. Before joining Ecology, Lauren worked for the Washington State Department of Transportation where she performed wetland studies on transportation projects statewide, designed mitigation sites, and participated in the development of the Washington Wetland Function Assessment model. Prior to that she worked for the two federal agencies: the US Forest Service doing trail work where she ran a pack string of mules; and the USFWS where she did Swampbuster work under the Farm Bill.

Lauren received her bachelor’s in environmental studies from the Evergreen State College where she studied ecology, botany, organic agriculture and computer sciences. Lauren and her husband live in Yelm, Washington and they have two fledging adult children along with a dog and two indoor cats (who are enjoying their new catio.) She enjoys gardening, doodling, card making, hiking and any excuse to get outside.

Collis AdmsCollis Adams, Past Chair

Collis has served on the Board of Directors of ASWM for many years including several terms as Chair. Collis recently retired as the administrator of the Wetlands Bureau at the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and is currently the owner/manager of Adams Environmental Consulting, LLC providing consulting services to property owners, engineers, municipalities, and others. During his tenure at DES he was responsible for all activities relative to the New Hampshire Dredge and Fill Law (NH RSA 482-A) and the Shoreland Water Quality Protection Act (NH RSA 483-B). Prior to filling that role, he spent ten years with the DES Alteration of Terrain Program reviewing and permitting stormwater management plans for large scale developments and 5 years with the DES Subsurface Systems Bureau reviewing plans for on-site wastewater disposal systems. As administrator of the wetlands bureau he was instrumental in the implementation of an in-lieu fee program for wetland mitigation and then expanding that program to include streams and their riparian habitats. Before DES, Collis spent six years in private engineering consulting and prior to that, a five-year stint with the New England Division of the Army Corps of Engineers. In 1980 Collis graduated with a BSCE degree in civil/environmental engineering from the University of Massachusetts. Collis lives in Goffstown, New Hampshire with his wife Laura. He has two children, one of each, and is particularly proud that he has instilled in them his same sense of love for the outdoors. Collis particularly enjoys spending time along the varied coastlines of New England. Collis also serves on his local Select Board, Planning Board, and Conservation Commission.

Members At Large


Stacia Bax, MO Department of Natural ResourcesStacia Bax - Missouri Department of Natural Resources

Stacia Bax is the Environmental Supervisor of the Stormwater and Certification Unit within the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Her unit includes 4 technical staff and implements the Section 401 Water Quality Certification Program, drafts renewals for approximately 40 Section 402 NPDES program master general permits (industrial stormwater, industrial process water, construction/land disturbance stormwater, and municipal stormwater), and implements aspects of the NPDES eReporting Rule. Stacia has nearly 20 years of experience with the department and has also worked with Section 319 Nonpoint Source grants, Water Quality Standards rulemaking, TMDL development, Montauk State Park as a seasonal naturalist, and fieldwork in the beautiful Ozarks of Southwest Missouri.

In her personal time, she enjoys spending time with her husband, daughter and son (and two dogs) hiking, camping, and kayaking as well as coaching NASP archery, leading Scouts BSA and Girl Scouts, and watching her daughter play volleyball. In her spare time, Stacia loves to read, cook and bake (pies are her favorite), explore new places, and craft fiber arts (knitting and crocheting namely, though she has a loom she would love to learn to weave on). She lives in Central Missouri.

 

 
 

Denise Clearwater, Maryland Department of the EnvironmentDenise Clearwater - Maryland Department of the Environment

Denise Clearwater has worked in Maryland’s wetland programs since 1986. She has a background in developing and implementing programs in wetland regulation, wetland training, and mitigation, as well as managing special projects for grants and program improvement and assisting in policy development. She has represented the Wetlands and Waterways Program in the Maryland Department of the Environment on numerous interagency work groups for regulatory, wetland monitoring, restoration, preservation and stream health and is a past co-chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetland Work Group. She is also a member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. Denise has a B.S. in zoology from the University of Maryland and an M.S. in wildlife management from Frostburg State College (now University). 

 

 


Andy RobertsonAndy Robertson, GeoSpatial Services at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

Andy Robertson is the Executive Director of GeoSpatial Services at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. In this role, he is responsible for oversight and management of all GeoSpatial Services projects, activities and staff. GeoSpatial Services is engaged in a wide variety of projects across the Lower 48 and Alaska including wetland inventory; National Hydrography Dataset updates; spatial data development; and, natural resource condition assessments. Andy has a diverse background in spatial information systems, watershed planning, wetland inventory, forest management, environmental impact assessment, desktop and server system support and database administration. He is a Registered Professional Forest Technologist (Alberta, Canada) and has experience leading natural resource projects for both private sector companies and public agencies across Canada and the United States including the Department of Interior, United States Army Corp of Engineers, NOAA, and the Department of Agriculture. Andy has a Forest Technology Diploma from Sault College of Applied Technology in Ontario, Canada, a B.Sc. in Environmental Science from the University of Waterloo and has completed postgraduate work in forest management at the University of Toronto. He is also a steering committee member for the ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium and is co-chair of the Alaska GeoSpatial Council Wetland Technical Group. 

Bill Ryan, Oregon Department of State LandsBill Ryan - Oregon Department of State Lands

Bill Ryan is the Deputy Director at the Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) leading the Aquatic Resources Management Program which is responsible for implementation of Oregon’s Removal-Fill and Wetlands Conservation Laws. Prior to joining the DSL in June of 2010, Bill enjoyed 14 years at the Oregon Department of Transportation performing environmental compliance work including wetlands delineation and mitigation, mitigation banking, regulatory streamlining and process improvement. Bill started his professional career in Southern California in 1989 providing environmental planning and habitat restoration expertise for various planning and engineering firms. Bill has been a member of ASWM for nine years. He also serves on the Board of the Oregon Public Management Association which provides networking and low cost training opportunities for managers and aspiring managers in public service. Bill has an undergraduate degree in GeographyEcosystems Management from UCLA and a master’s in Biology from California State University, Fullerton. His master’s thesis topic was a study of succession in the alluvial scrub plant community following flood events in the Santa Ana River, California. In his spare time Bill enjoys hiking, camping, travel, skiing, singing acapella madrigals with the Sherwood Renaissance Singers and reading a good book.

Mary Ann Tilton, NH Dept. of Environmental ServicesMary Ann Tilton - New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

Mary Ann Tilton is the Assistant Wetlands Bureau Administrator with the State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services (NHDES), Wetlands Bureau. She has been with NHDES for over 30 years in various management and supervisory positions. She helped develop the Wetlands Enforcement program and supervised wetlands compliance for 17 years. She has served as the Assistant Administrator since 2005 and oversees state wetlands rules development, program development, and wetlands permitting. She is the recipient of an EPA Merit Award (2019) for development of a Wetlands BMP, multi-year rules initiative, and development of stream crossing rules. She holds a BA degree in Botany and Zoology from Connecticut College, MS in Zoology from University of Rhode Island, and a JD from UNH Law School (formerly Franklin Pierce Law Center), and is a Professional Wetland Scientist (PWS) and member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. She lives with her family in Concord, NH and enjoys hiking in the White Mountains, skiing, and exploring arboretums.

Current Resources and Publications

ASWM PUBLICATIONS 2014-2017 
 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS

Wetland Restoration: Contemporary Issues and Lessons Learned (August 2017)
There is general agreement among restoration professionals that the science exists to achieve restoration goals and that wetland restoration performance will improve if certain barriers are addressed. Many lessons have been learned over the past 50 years and there are wetland professionals throughout the country who have found methods to effectively address these barriers. However, much of this information is stored in the minds of those who have learned these lessons over time. Our intent with this paper is to disseminate this information, provide guidance for improving restoration outcomes and to identify practical solutions for those who can implement them. This white paper was developed with guidance from a national expert work group in order to disseminate this information, present potential solutions to restoration challenges and barriers, and recommend specific actions that can be taken to improve wetland restoration outcomes.

ASWM Wetland Communications Case Studies Project Report (August 2017)
To better inform communications planning and future research on wetland messaging and opportunities, ASWM recently completed a project on how to effectively communicate wetland science and benefits. Ten case studies were selected, representing a range of geographic locations, target audiences, messaging goals, tools used and level of development. Each case study provides information on project need and context, timeframe, goals and objectives, target audience, messages, delivery approach, specific communication tools employed, advice/lessons learned, next steps, transferability, resource investment, partners, evaluation results and case study contact information.

New Features and Publications Challenges & Solutions in Coastal Wetlands: Findings, Gaps & Priorities (October 2016)
This white paper is divided into three topic areas addressing major threats to coastal wildlife. The three subject matter areas include: (1) wetland protection and management; (2) wetland restoration; and (3) natural coastal defenses. This paper is the final product of a one-year grant from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program and is intended to identify gaps and priorities that can be addressed in future years by the Association of State Wetland Managers and other organizations. 

Governmental Liability and Climate Change: Selected Issues for Wetland and Floodplain Managers (April 2016)
Governments may increase flood damages by failing to anticipate climate change (e.g., failing to elevate houses) in their programs and policies. This paper by Dr. Jon Kusler, Esq. is one of several designed to help government wetland and floodplain managers understand their potential legal liability for failing to consider climate change in their programs or for incorporating strengthened flood loss reduction standards reflecting climate change in their zoning, building codes, subdivision and other regulations. 

Legal Issues in Upgrading Flood Maps to Reflect Climate Change, Other Changed Conditions (April 2016)
Governments will, over time, need to upgrade flood hazard maps to reflect climate change, urbanization, erosion and sedimentation and other watershed changes. Will governments face legal problems with such upgrading? How can governments avoid legal problems? This paper by Dr. Jon Kusler, Esq. provides an overview of the types, uses and limitations of existing floodplain maps, examples of court cases dealing with floodplain maps and recommendations for avoiding problems with upgrading floodplain maps to reflect climate change and other changed conditions. 

Definition of Wetland, Floodplain, Riparian “Functions” and “Values” (April 2016)
State and federal wetland regulatory programs typically include an overall goal to prevent net loss of wetland “functions”, and “values”. However, there is only partial agreement among regulators and other wetland managers concerning the use of these terms. This paper explores the use of the terms “function” and “value” and makes suggestions for future use of these terms.

A Comparative Analysis of Ecosystem Service Valuation Decision Support Tools for Wetland Restoration (March 2016)
The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) published a report in 2014 on the valuation of ecosystem services as an advantageous method for the promotion of wetland restoration. As a continuation to this effort, in 2015 we conducted an extensive review of existing decision support tools suitable for the valuation of ecosystem services for wetland restoration. This report describes six tools that maintain “off-the-shelf” capability and currently demonstrate the greatest potential for widespread dissemination and use.  

Protecting and Restoring Riparian Areas (March 2016)
This paper briefly examines the functions and values of “riparian” areas. It suggests some priority measures states, local governments, federal agencies, and not for profit organizations can take to better protect and restore riparian areas.

Model “Riparian” Protection Ordinance (March 2016)
The model ordinance provided in this paper is designed to help local communities develop their own “riparian” ordinance and has been prepared as a “stand alone” ordinance. However critical provisions could be extracted for inclusion in broader ordinances. 

Status and Trends Report on State Wetland Programs in the United States (October 2015)
ASWM’s national study was designed to: 1) assess status and trends; 2) identify models and lessons learned; and 3) document information and program development needs. Information gathered for each state includes a focus on status of programmatic elements, focusing on EPA’s Core Elements Framework. In addition to the report, a clickable map on ASWM’s Wetland Program Webpage allows users to access individual state summaries for each of the 50 states. 

Wetlands and Climate Change: Considerations for Wetland Program Managers (July 2015)
This paper explores the relationships between wetland management and climate mitigation and adaptation. These relationships are divided into three categories: the impacts of climate change on wetland ecosystems; the role of wetlands in mitigating the impact of climate change; and the role of wetlands in supporting adaptation to climate change impacts. 
 

Uses of Monitoring and Assessment: Considerations for State and Tribal Programs (June 2015)
This report explores the various ways that states and tribes could make better use of existing monitoring and assessment methods to obtain science-based answers to wetland management problems. While it provides an overview of many common approaches to wetland monitoring, the focus is primarily on why these methods are selected for a given purpose. 

Report on State Definitions, Jurisdiction and Mitigation Requirements in State Programs for Ephemeral, Intermittent and Perennial Streams in the United States (April 2014)
This report discusses the findings from ASWM’s national study on stream identification, delineation and mitigation in the United States. The project interviewed state staff from 47 states and provides both a comparative analysis and information on individual states.   

Ecosystem Service Valuation for Wetland Restoration: What It Is, How To Do It and Best Practice Recommendations (2014)
This paper is intended to assist those interested in using ecosystem service valuation to promote wetland restoration by: explaining what ecosystem service valuation is; framing it within the history of wetland science and policy; identifying available methods and tools; offering examples of use through case studies of watershed and/or wetland restoration projects that have utilized ecosystem service valuation; and providing recommendations for using ecosystem service valuation within the context of wetland restoration. 


CURRENT RESOURCES AND ACTIVITIES

Wetlands One-Stop Mapping This section of our website provides comprehensive information and links to geospatial data on wetlands, soils and related information.  It also includes important information about Federal mapping standards and a page dedicated to wetland mapping training with educational training videos. Included is a 2013 summary of the status of state wetland mapping efforts and examples of the long list of ways wetland maps are used to support decision making for agriculture, transportation planning wildlife conservation, wetland restoration, permitting and more.

Members' Wetland Webinar Series ASWM hosts an exclusive wetland webinar series available to members only. Members may participate and also have access to recordings of past webinars, such as the recently held webinars on incorporating wetlands into watershed planning. These webinars offer our members the opportunity to listen and engage with wetland science, policy and legal experts, and learn from the experience of other wetland professionals throughout the nation. Monthly webinars cover science, legal and policy issues.

Wetland Mapping Consortium The Association of State Wetland Managers is a founding member of the Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC), an interdisciplinary group of wetland scientists, mappers and wetland managers interested in mapping and monitoring wetlands with remotely sensed images and/or using the resultant products to better manage wetland resources. The WMC Steering Committee organizes bi-monthly webinars on topics of interest to the group. These webinars are open to anyone and are generally held on the third Wednesday of the month at 3:00 p.m. eastern time. Recorded past webinars are available on our website for free download.

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance ASWM is a founding member of the Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA), an affiliation of nonprofit and private organizations, government agencies and individuals dedicated to the protection and preservation of the natural functions of floodplains, including wetlands and coastlines. Members share information and may elect to coordinate actions on issues of interest, but the NFFA does not take formal positions on matters of national policy, guidance or legislation. The Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) holds bimonthly events in a combined webinar and conference call format which are generally scheduled for 3:00 p.m. ET on the second Tuesday of each month. Recorded past webinars are available on our website for free download.  


FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS

  • Wetland Restoration: Contemporary Issues & Lessons Learned
  • Success Recommendations for Wetland Education Curricula
  • Best Practices for State Wetland Monitoring & Assessment Programs


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Publications

ASWM PublicationsThe Association conducts research and publishes reports, guidebooks, news articles, brochures, white papers, and summaries of findings of symposia and workshops. These are available electronically to all interested individuals and organizations.

New Features & Publications 2014-2015

ASWM Board Meeting Minutes

Below are the ASWM Board Meeting Minutes to date.