The Association of State Wetland Managers is a nonprofit membership organization established in 1983 to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources, to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts and to provide training and education for our members and the public. Membership is open to anyone who is involved with wetland resources.

404

404: Not Found

Sorry, but the content you requested could not be found

 

DEBUG - This is the Joomla 404 Error Message

Past Section 404 Assumption Webinars

Past Assumption Webinars

In March 2021, ASWM completed a multi-year project on Clean Water Act Section 404 Assumption. This webinar series addresses key elements and issues of assumption that are faced by states and tribes. Content in this webinar series does not replace formal rulemaking and guidance from EPA. Webinars will cover some of the basic considerations for states and tribes, as well as share examples of states and tribes working on assumption activities.

For more information and/or to join our email list for notices about upcoming events, please contact Laura Burchill at  or (207) 892-3399.

View a List of Past Section 404 Assumption Webinar Recordings Here

Please click on a year below to view past webinars.

2021

2020

View Upcoming Section 404 Assumption Webinars Here

2021 Past Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinars

 Building State and Tribal Wetland Program Regulatory Capacity: Findings from ASWM’s
Multi-year Project

Held Tuesday, March 23, 2021 - 3:00 – 4:30 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This final webinar in our Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Series shared final findings and products from ASWM’s multi-year project. The webinar highlighted key takeaways on fundamental building blocks for regulatory development, including addressing regulatory gaps, identifying sustainable funding strategies and tips on working with state legislatures to support regulatory programs. Next, the webinar highlighted EPA Wetland Program Plans as strategic planning tools and potential funding for states and tribes developing regulatory program elements. The webinar then covered ways to build compliance and enforcement capacity, possible value-added from integrating with other state agency programs, and ways to expand reach through partnering with state wetland associations. While the project primarily focused on state agency considerations, findings may also be useful to tribes. The final segment of the webinar delved a little deeper into strategic planning, sharing a new tool from ASWM – an extensive checklist that walks interested parties through considerations around planning for regulatory enhancements. The webinar ended sharing some strategies for effective communication around regulatory capacity building efforts and sharing of how to access ASWM’s new regulatory capacity building resources.

BIOS

Yvonne ValletteYvonne Vallette is an Aquatic Ecologist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For the last twenty-five years she has worked at EPA Region 10’s Oregon Operations Office in Portland serving as the Region’s coordinator for enhancing State and Tribal Programs. Her work with EPA is focused on the technical and policy aspects of the Clean Water Act (CWA), including Section 404. Her practicable experience includes work in: aquatic resource monitoring and assessment, 404 enforcement, compensatory mitigation, impact analysis, CWA jurisdiction, 404 program assumption, and aquatic resources restoration.






Matt SchweisbergMatt Schweisberg is the Principal of Wetland Strategies and Solutions, LLC, where he provides policy, regulatory and technical advice and assistance for clients seeking to navigate a wide range of regulatory and non-regulatory issues related to wetlands and other aquatic resources. He works throughout the U.S. Matt is a Professional Wetland Scientist under the Professional Certification Program of the Society of Wetland Scientists. He is a retired federal wetlands ecologist and wildlife biologist who spent over 32 years with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at its HQ office in Washington, D.C. and New England Region office in Boston. Matt served as Chief of the New England Region’s Wetlands Protection Program and Senior Wetland Ecologist, and on national work groups developing guidance and regulations on Clean Water Act jurisdiction. He has testified before federal grand juries and served several times as an expert witness in federal, state, and private litigation. He co-instructs a week-long intensive course on wetland identification and delineation at the Eagle Hill Institute in Maine, and has taught courses in wetland regulation, restoration and creation, wetland ecology, and wetland identification and delineation for federal and state agencies, academic organizations, and environmental consultants. He received his degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Maine.

Brenda Zollitsch, PhD, ASWMBrenda Zollitsch is Senior Policy Analyst at the Association of State Wetland Managers. Over the last two years, Brenda has led ASWM’s Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Project, coordinating the project workgroup, dialogues and research to develop the resources that will be presented during this webinar. At ASWM, Brenda conducts research and policy analysis on wetland and stream issues; works to analyze and respond to emerging wetland-related rules and regulations; manages projects; and designs, coordinates and evaluates training for wetland professionals. Brenda is also currently leading a multi-year national project on assumption of the Clean Water Act Section 404 Program. Brenda earned a double Master’s degree in International Relations and Environmental Resource Management from Boston University and her PhD in Public Policy from the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service.






View Past Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinars Here

View a List of Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar Recordings Here

 

2021 Past Section 404 Assumption Webinars

Conducting Federal-State/Tribal Regulatory Crosswalks for Clean Water Act Section 404 Assumption

Held Monday, March 22, 2021 - 3:00 – 4:30 pm Eastern

View Webinar Here

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS  [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

  • Heather Mason, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
  • Barbara Poage, Oregon Department of State Lands
  • Les Lemm, Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources
  • Ken Powell, Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources

ABSTRACT

In the assumption planning process, states and tribes must complete a regulatory crosswalk. The purpose of the crosswalk is to examine any differences between state and federal standards and to provide insights into any gaps that may need to be filled. The regulatory crosswalk allows states and tribes to show that the final program, when ready for assumption, provides a no less stringent than federal regulatory program. This webinar discussed the basics of regulatory crosswalks and provide three different experiences from states that have completed or are in the process of completing a regulatory crosswalk as part of their assumption planning process. Presenters included staff from Florida (which recently assumed the 404 Program), Oregon which has completed the crosswalk but is still in the process of developing their assumption package, and Minnesota, which is in the early phases of conducting their analysis. Each presenter shared when in the assumption process they conducted their crosswalk, what process and format they used to conduct it, and any challenges they encountered. They shared what their crosswalk found/is finding, whether there were any gaps or inconsistencies that needed to be addressed and how they filled them. Each presenter shared lessons learned and tips for others planning to conduct a regulatory crosswalk. The webinar ended with a Q&A session with the presenters.

BIOS

Heather MasonHeather Mason is an Environmental Administrator at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, leading the Submerged Lands and Environmental Resources Coordination program’s training and rulemaking team. Her team is currently working on Florida’s 404 assumption effort. Her education includes an M.S. in Environmental Science and B.S. in Environmental Management. She is also a certified Professional Wetland Scientist (PWS). 

 

 

Barbara PoageBarbara Poage is a Hydrogeologist with 20+ years in environmental and hydrologic consulting for private sector, tribal, non-profit, industrial, and state and federal government. She has managed innumerable environmental investigation and remediation projects throughout the west coast, has served as a tribal Superfund (CERCLA) Program Manager in New Mexico, and has excelled in state and federal rule and statute application and interpretation throughout her career. She has worked for Oregon Water Resources Department in water rights for many years and is currently the Clean Water Act 404 Assumption Analyst for Oregon Department of State Lands. Barbara holds a Bachelor of Science in Geology from University of Idaho and a Masters in Hydrology from New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. As well, Barbara is an instrument-rated pilot and FAA Part 107 Certified sUAS (drone) Pilot Operator and small business owner (Right Strut Aviation LLC).

 

Les LemmLes Lemm is the Wetlands Section Manager for the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. He is responsible for overseeing implementation of the State Wetland Conservation Act, Minnesota’s comprehensive wetland protection law, including a robust wetland banking program. He has a variety of other experience, including working as a charter boat captain on Minnesota’s Lake of the Woods, a natural resource consultant, and the District Manager for the Lake of the Woods Soil and Water Conservation District. Les has a Bachelor’s degree in Natural Resource Management from the University of Minnesota and a Master’s degree in Resource Economics from North Dakota State University.
 

 

Ken PowellKen Powell is the Minnesota Wetland Conservation Act Operations Supervisor for the state’s wetland regulatory program. He has worked at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources for the last 14 years and has been a practicing wetland scientist and policy specialist since 1992. He earned a B.S. in Wildlife from the U. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and an M.S. in Biology from Kansas State University. 

 

 

  

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers; Presenters: Heather Mason, Florida Department of Environmental Protection; Barbara Poage, Oregon Department of State Lands; and Les Lemm, Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources

Play

Part 2: Panel Discussion

Play

Part 3: Panel Discussion

previous arrow
next arrow
previous arrownext arrow
Slider


Findings from ASWM’s Multi-Year Clean Water Act Section 404 Assumption Project

Held Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern

View Webinar Here

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

  • Kathy Hurld, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Brian Wolff, Indiana Department of Environmental Management
  • Laura Johnson, Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy
  • Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers

ABSTRACT

This webinar will share the findings of the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) multi-year project on assumption of the Clean Water Act Section 404 Program. The webinar will outline the key elements of a complete assumption package, walking through project findings on each element from ASWM’s multi-year project on assumption. The webinar will introduce participants to new resources developed through the project, including a matrix of existing examples of assumption package components, a checklist of considerations for those exploring assumption, and many support documents, as well as how to access ASWM’s archived assumption webinar series. The webinar will include basics for each element, as well as key lessons learned from states that have explored or are working towards assumption. The webinar will end with discussion about the new forthcoming Clean Water Act 404(g) Rule and some of the important things to look for when it is published (expected 2021). The webinar will include time for participants to ask questions of the panelists.

BIOS

Kathy HurlsKathy Hurld is an Environmental Protection Specialist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, DC. Her nearly 30 years’ experience working on ocean, coastal, wetland, agroforestry and other environmental issues, has taken her throughout the U.S. and internationally as she worked on both the local and international level. Currently, Kathy is the EPA’s staff lead on Clean Water Act Section 404(g) and works to assist states and tribes pursuing assumption of the program. Kathy has a BS in biology from Hope College and a Master’s in Public Administration from American University.



ASWM’s Assumption Project Workgroup Members have been meeting monthly for more than two years. Comprised of state, tribal, federal and academic experts, ASWM’s Assumption workgroup has more than 30 members. Each month, the workgroup has tackled complex issues around assuming the 404 Program. These have included dialogue around conducting regulatory crosswalks, completing assumable waters analysis, developing memoranda of understanding, and more. Workgroup members will join in presenting key findings and lessons learned.

Brian WolffBrian Wolff, a member of ASWM’s project work group, has served as the Branch Chief of Surface Water, and Operations for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management for the past 6 years. The branch covers Wetlands, Stormwater, MS4’s, and operational duties for all of the water quality division. Prior to joining Water Quality, Brian served 10 years as manager of the Special Projects Section in the Office of Air Quality, and for 5 years evaluated risk assessments in the Office of Land Quality. Brian has a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Indiana University. 

 

Laura JohnsonLaura Johnson is the Clean Water Act 404 Section Supervisor for the Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy managing the 401 water quality certification program and leads a 404 assumption team. She has been with the Department since 2012 and served as the Integrated Report and TMDL Coordinator for the first 7 years. Laura earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Natural Resources and Environmental Economics with a minor in Water Science from the University of Nebraska Lincoln.

 

 

Brenda Zollitsch, PhD, ASWMBrenda Zollitsch is Senior Policy Analyst at the Association of State Wetland Managers. Over the last two years, Brenda has led ASWM’s Assumption Project, coordinating the project workgroup, dialogues and research to develop the resources that will be presented during this webinar. At ASWM, Brenda conducts research and policy analysis on wetland and stream issues; works to analyze and respond to emerging wetland-related rules and regulations; manages projects; and designs, coordinates and evaluates training for wetland professionals. Brenda is also currently leading a multi-year national project on Wetland regulatory Capacity Building. Brenda earned a double Master’s degree in International Relations and Environmental Resource Management from Boston University and her PhD in Public Policy from the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service.

 

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Marla Stelk, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenters: Kathy Hurld, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers

Play

Part 2: Presenters: Brian Wolff, Indiana Department of Environmental Management and
Laura Johnson, Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy

Play

Part 3: Presenters: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers and
Kathy Hurld, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Play

Part 4: Questions & Answers

previous arrow
next arrow
previous arrownext arrow
Slider




Understanding Alternatives: State Programmatic General Permits and Assumption of the § 404 Program

Held Friday, February 26, 2021 - 3:00-5:00 pm ET 

View Webinar Here

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

An increasing number of states are looking to create regulatory consistency and stability in their aquatic resource permitting programs. The Clean Water Act Amendments allow states to increase responsibility by assuming some administration of federal regulatory programs – State Programmatic General Permits (SPGPs) and 404 Assumption. While the options of developing general permits and assuming the § 404 program have been around for a long time, there remains confusion about what each option can offer and what some of the challenges and opportunities around them are. This webinar discussed the differences between developing a general permit and assuming the § 404 Dredge or Fill Permit Program, as well as some of the pros and cons for each. Panelists shared key questions that they recommend a state or tribe explore before making decisions and the importance of context and timing. The webinar ended with a discussion of developing a general permit as a stepping stone towards assumption and an opportunity for webinar participants to ask questions on the topic.

BIOS

Donna DowningDonna Downing is the Senior Legal Policy Advisor, Association of State Wetland Managers. Donna was the Jurisdiction Team Leader in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Donna worked on a variety of issues at EPA, with a focus in recent years on the geographic scope of the Clean Water Act (CWA) in light of the U.S. Supreme Court decisions. She also served as EPA’s staff lead for CWA section 401 water quality certification, and on wetland-related legal issues. Prior to joining EPA in 1998, Donna worked for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and in private law practice. She has a BA magna cum laude from Harvard University, an MPP from the University of California at Berkeley, a JD cum laude from Georgetown University Law School, and an LLM in Environmental Law summa cum laude from George Washington University Law School. Donna has been an adjunct professor at George Washington University Law School since 1996, teaching environmental law. In what’s left of her time, she moonlights as a professional potter and an unprofessional horse trainer. Donna also enjoys traveling and has traveled by reindeer sled in the Swedish Arctic, gone winter camping with dog sleds in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Wilderness Area, and bicycled the Burma Road in China.

Eric MetzEric Metz, PWS, is the Principal of Marsh MD Wetland Consults based in Salem, Oregon. Most recently Eric was a Senior Policy & Legislative Analyst for the Oregon Department of State Lands and a senior manager in the Oregon State Removal-Fill Program. Earlier in his career, he was the Wetland Coordinator for the California Coastal Commission, for a combined total of more than 30 years of experience with two state wetland regulatory programs. Eric has also been a private wetland and environmental consultant in the Pacific Northwest and in Alaska and a wetland restoration project manager for the National Audubon Society. In 2014 Eric teamed up with Oregon Wetland Consultants and provided the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation a cost analysis for operating a state-assumed 404 program. Eric has a BA in geography with a minor in biology from Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, and a Master of Landscape Architecture with an Environmental Planning emphasis from the University of California, Berkeley.


Barbara PoageBarbara Poage is a Hydrogeologist with 20+ years in environmental and hydrologic consulting for private sector, tribal, non-profit, industrial, and state and federal government. She has managed innumerable environmental investigation and remediation projects throughout the west coast, has served as a tribal Superfund (CERCLA) Program Manager in New Mexico, and has excelled in state and federal rule and statute application and interpretation throughout her career. She has worked for Oregon Water Resources Department in water rights for many years and is currently the Clean Water Act 404 Assumption Analyst for Oregon Department of State Lands. Barbara holds a Bachelor of Science in Geology from University of Idaho and a Masters in Hydrology from New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. As well, Barbara is an instrument-rated pilot and FAA Part 107 Certified sUAS (drone) Pilot Operator and small business owner (Right Strut Aviation LLC).  

 

Timothy RacTimothy Rach is a Program Administrator in the Submerged Lands & Environmental Resources Coordination Program at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). He has been with DEP for over 23 years in various management and supervisory positions. Most of his time has been in the Environmental Resources Permitting program regulating development in wetlands and surface waters. Tim is responsible for overseeing the statewide implementation of the ERP rules and regulations within the Department, Water Management Districts and local delegated programs. He holds a Bachelors of Science degree in Marine Biology from Troy University and a Masters of Science degree in Ecology from Old Dominion University. 

 

 

Denise ClearwaterDenise Clearwater has worked in Maryland’s wetland programs since 1986. She has a background in developing and implementing programs in wetland regulation, wetland training, and mitigation, as well as managing special projects for grants and program improvement and assisting in policy development. She has represented the Wetlands and Waterways Program in the Maryland Department of the Environment on numerous interagency work groups for regulatory, wetland monitoring, restoration, preservation and stream health and is a past co-chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetland Work Group. She is also a member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. Denise has a B.S. in zoology from the University of Maryland and an M.S. in wildlife management from Frostburg State College (now University). 


 

 

Play

Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Donna Downing, Association of State Wetland Managers

Play

Part 2: Presenters: Barbara Poage, Oregon Department of State Lands and Eric Metz, Marsh MD Wetland Consulting

Play

Part 3: Presenters: Timothy Rach, Florida Department of Environmental Protection and Denise Clearwater, Maryland Department of the Environment

Play

Part 4: Questions & Answers

previous arrow
next arrow
previous arrownext arrow
Slider
 

View Past Section 404 Assumption Webinars Here

 View a List of Past Section 404 Assumption Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Section 404 Assumption Webinars Here

Past Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) collaborated to develop a series of webinars introducing the topic of restoration of aquatic ecosystems through the reintroduction of beavers, the use of beaver dam analogues (BDAs) or restoration designed to attract beavers to an area to contribute to changing hydrology and restoring ecosystem services. This webinar series was developed with guidance from a national workgroup of beaver restoration experts with presentations provided by practitioners, managers and researchers working in the field. The webinar series covers the basics of beaver restoration and continues through implementation challenges and ways to encourage beaver restoration projects. 

View a List of Past Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar Recordings Here

 Please click on a year below to view past webinars.

2021

2020

2021 Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars

Beaver Restoration for Climate Resiliency

Held Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern   

View Webinar Here

 

 

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTER

ABTRACT

The final webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the role that beaver restoration can play in building climate resiliency to drought and wildfires. Beaver dams are gaining popularity as a low‐tech, low‐cost strategy to build climate resiliency at the landscape scale. They slow and store water that can be accessed by riparian vegetation during dry periods, effectively protecting riparian ecosystems from droughts. The webinar showcased research which indicates that beavers are able to create and maintain wetlands resistant to both seasonal and multiyear droughts and that this landscape wetting and drought buffering goes on to reduce or prevent burning in wildfire. Perhaps instead of relying solely on human engineering and management to create and maintain fire‐resistant landscape patches, we could benefit from beaver’s ecosystem engineering to achieve the same goals at a lower cost.

BIO

Emily FairfaxDr. Emily Fairfax is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Resource Management at California State University Channel Islands. Dr. Fairfax double majored in Chemistry and Physics as an undergraduate at Carleton College, then went on to earn a PhD in Geological Sciences from the University of Colorado Boulder. She uses a combination of remote sensing and field work to research how beaver activity can create drought and fire-resistant patches in the landscape under a changing climate. Her colleagues and students can vouch that when Dr. Fairfax says she can talk about beavers all day, she’s not kidding.

  

Play

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers;
Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands

Play

Part 2: Presenter: Emily Fairfax, California State University Channel Islands

Play

Part 3: Questions & Answers

previous arrow
next arrow
previous arrownext arrow
Slider

 

Coalition Building for Beaver Based Stream and Wetland Restoration Success

Held Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern

View Webinar Here

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This fifth webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on how coalition building is essential to advancing the practice of process-based stream and floodplain restoration by helping the regulatory environment be responsive to the evolving understanding around functioning, intact riverscapes. Intentional and inclusive outreach efforts and creative partnerships are critical to achieving positive restoration outcomes. Restoring floodplains based on mimicking beaver dam inundated wetlands and their inherent complexity is a paradigm shift for the stream and wetland restoration community. Practitioners are eager to engage and the science community has jumped in to lead on methods for restoration, evaluation, and assessment. However, the regulatory community, both the formal statutory authority content and the interpretation of these regulations to allow on-the-ground restoration actions, has not seen the same degree of development. As such, a growing gap between natural process-based restoration methods and the legal authority for their implementation threatens to stall the vital progress science-based stream restoration is making. Cultural change is necessary to bridge this gap and generate the required broad understanding and adoption of novel best practices. Only through inclusive coalitions building will it be possible to develop commonly held values around functioning, process-based, vibrant ecosystems that support the natural and human ecologies essential for resilient ecosystems.

BIOS

Chris JohnsonDr. Chris Jordan is a Research Fisheries Biologist with NOAA/NMFS’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Program Manager for the Mathematical Biology and Systems Monitoring Program. Trained as a mathematical biologist, he has worked on a wide range of biological topics, all with an emphasis on the development or application of quantitative methods. His recent work has focused on the design and implementation of large-scale monitoring programs to assess anadromous salmonid freshwater habitat and population status as well as the watershed-scale effect of management actions on salmonid habitat and population processes. Some current projects include the development of life-cycle simulation models to integrate knowledge on physical and biological processes into a management decision support framework and the development of methods for stream restoration focusing on beaver and process-based thinking. 

Alexa WhippleAlexa Whipple as an ecologist, a farmer, and the Project Director for the Methow Beaver Project, Alexa works for sustainability in all practices and effective natural process solutions to challenging environmental conditions. She has called the Methow Valley home for the last 20 years but has worked across the western US growing food and studying songbirds, carnivores, plant communities, agricultural impacts on habitat and wildlife, and wildfire impacts on western riparian ecosystems. Alexa completed her MS in Restoration Ecology at Eastern Washington University where she focused on beaver ecology and beaver mediated restoration of degraded and wildfire impacted streams in the Methow River watershed. 


Natalie ArroyoNatalie Arroyo lives and works in beautiful Eureka, California. Natalie is currently serving her 2nd term on the Eureka City Council. Representing Eureka, Natalie serves as chair of the Humboldt Transit Authority. She is currently a member of the US Coast Guard Reserve. Natalie is also a lecturer at Humboldt State University in the Environmental Science and Management department, and a senior planner with the Natural Resources Services division of Redwood Community Action Agency, a non-profit organization. Natalie also serves on the board of the Klamath River Renewal Corporation, and previously served as board president of the Humboldt Trails Council, and as a board member of the Salmonid Restoration Federation. In her spare time she enjoys playing roller derby, outdoor recreation activities of all kinds, and time spent with her husband and their two small but tenacious dogs. 


Play

Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of State Wetland Managers 
Presenter: Chris Jordan, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Play

Part 2: Presenter: Alexa Whipple, Methow Beaver Project

Play

Part 3: Presenter: Natalie Arroyo

previous arrow
next arrow
previous arrownext arrow
Slider
 

View Past Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here

View a List of Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinars Here

2021 Past Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinars

Protecting and Restoring Urban Wetlands for Community Benefits

Held Thursday, March 25, 2021 - 3:00 pm-4:30 pm Eastern

INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

Wetlands reduce flooding, diminish urban heat, filter water, and provide green spaces for people and wildlife alike making cities more livable. However, state and federal wetland programs often fail to fully recognize and account for the full spectrum of benefits urban wetlands provide. They are often maligned as too small, too ecologically degraded, and facing too many local stressors to be prioritized for restoration and protection by programs with limited available resources. As a result, urban communities are more likely to see their wetland resources developed and impacted while more rural systems are restored and protected. Urban communities benefit from natural spaces and wetland functions as much as rural areas, even if those natural spaces are not ecologically pristine. Local communities need to take an active role in recognizing, protecting, and restoring their wetland resources. This webinar presented an overview of the needs and challenges surrounding urban wetlands and share examples where communities have taken steps to incorporate wetland resources into broader urban planning and restoration efforts.

BIOS

William DooleyBill Dooley is a Policy Analyst with the Association of State Wetland Managers. In this role, he conducts research and analysis on wetland related policy and program issues; and facilitates various workgroups and ad hoc committees including the Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance and the Wetland Mapping Consortium. Over the past two years, he has been project lead on an EPA WPDG focused on improving restoration and protection outcomes around urban wetlands. Bill has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from Assumption College and a Master of Public Policy with a concentration in Environmental Policy from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He enjoys hiking and camping throughout New England with his family and friends and playing board games and card games whenever possible.

Laurie Gilligan Laurie Gilligan is a wetland ecologist at the Colorado Natural Heritage Program (CNHP). Her current work focuses on wetland assessment and plains and Front Range wetlands. Laurie has a Masters of Science degree from Oregon State University in Ecology. Besides her eight years at CNHP, she has worked on various field jobs including urban wetland surveys and mapping for the City of Portland; and forest ecology, desert, and riparian field work in the west. She enjoys spending her off-time doing yoga, capoeira, and adventuring outside with her family.



Jesse Barham Jesse Barham is currently the Environmental Services Supervisor at the City of Olympia Public Works in Washington State. He has been working on wetland and riparian restoration/mitigation projects in Western WA for over 20 years including monitoring, developing, and managing wetland mitigation banks with Washington State Department of Transportation; planning and implementing riparian restoration and salmon recovery projects for a local tribe; acting as restoration ecologist on a large levee removal and estuary restoration project; and six years with the City of Olympia as a Habitat Planner in the Storm and Surface Water Utility. Over the years, Jesse became more interested in the relationship between human alteration and ecosystem function across the landscape leading him to working on connecting aquatic habitat function and water quality issues for local government. He enjoys backpacking in local mountains, gardening, and sailing in the Salish Sea.

View Past Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinars Here

View a List of Past Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar Recordings Here

View Upcoming Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinars Here

Past Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinars

Past Capacity Building WebinarsIn March 2021, ASWM completed a multi-year project on Building State and Tribal Wetland Regulatory Capacity. This webinar series will provide useful findings, state and tribal lessons learned and useful tools and techniques that can be used to help wetland programs increase effectiveness, efficiency, transparency and predictability in regulatory activities.

For more information and/or to join our email list for notices about upcoming events, please contact Laura Burchill at or (207) 892-3399. 

View a List of Wetland Regulatory Capacity Building Webinar Recordings Here

Please click on a year below to view past webinars.

2021

2020

 

Certificate of Participation: Beavers and Wetland and Restoration Webinar: February 4, 2021

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the February 4, 2021 Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar “Coalition Building for Beaver Based Stream and Wetland Restoration Success”

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Beavers and Wetland Restoration Webinar “Coalition Building for Beaver Based Stream and Wetland Restoration Success” on Thursday, February 4, 2021 from 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    Member CertificateAll ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

Non-Member CertificateA) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

Join ASWMB) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Certificate of Participation Members' Webinar September 30, 2020

How to Receive a Certificate of Participation for the September 30, 2020 ASWM Members’ Webinar: Large-scale Wetland Restoration that Harnesses the Power of Natural Infrastructure for Water Quality Improvement in Agricultural Landscapes

Using the ClassMarker online system, ASWM will ask you to certify that you participated in the entire live ASWM Members' webinar “Large-scale Wetland Restoration that Harnesses the Power of Natural Infrastructure for Water Quality Improvement in Agricultural Landscapes” on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern.

Please do the following:

  • Choose one of the options from the box below. (ASWM Member or Non-Member)
  • Once you are in ClassMarker, click on Start and enter your email address and create a password.
  • Do not click on Log in and Resume. The Resume button is there in case you misplace this specific certificate and need to retrieve it again. It won’t work for future webinar certificates.
  • You will need to create a new password for each webinar certificate you wish to obtain.
  • Then follow the prompts and enter your name as you wish it to appear on your certificate and answer the 2 questions about membership and attending the live webinar.

Answering “yes” to the question about your participation will automatically qualify you to receive a certificate for your attendance. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Participation from ClassMarker after you complete the questions.

Once you download your certificate, you can then submit it to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits. 

   
Please select the appropriate certificate process:

  • I am an ASWM Member:
    All ASWM members receive free Certificates of Participation for webinars. Non-Members will be charged a processing fee of $25.00 US. To receive your free Certificate of Participation, click here.

If you are not a current ASWM Member, you must select the non-member certificate link to receive your certificate. 

  • I am not an ASWM Member:
    If you are not an ASWM member, please either:

A) Select the Non-member Certificate Option to get your certificate. All non-ASWM Members are required to pay a $25.00 certificate processing fee. You will be prompted to pay the processing fee using PayPal, with the option to sign in as either a PayPal member or as a guest (not requiring a PayPal account and using your credit card).  

B) We encourage you to go to the ASWM.org website and become a member so that you can receive certificates at no charge for the next 12 months.  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at or contact the ASWM office at (207) 892-3399.

 

Publications

ASWM PublicationsThe Association conducts research and publishes reports, guidebooks, news articles, brochures, white papers, and summaries of findings of symposia and workshops. These are available electronically to all interested individuals and organizations.

New Features & Publications 2014-2015

ASWM Board Meeting Minutes

Below are the ASWM Board Meeting Minutes to date.