Member's Login

Goodsearch: You Search...We Give!
Support the Association of State Wetland Managers 
when you search the Web or shop online with Goodsearch.


Association of State Wetland Managers

Wetland Breaking News

Wetland Breaking News: December 2014 

                   
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &  
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

Wetland Breaking News - December 2014

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

Visit ASWM online to read weekly news updates between issues.

Please send comments and news stories to news@aswm.org.

Thank you for your continued interest.

PRINT THIS ISSUE
   


 

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     


EDITOR'S NOTE

WHAT BEING A VOLUNTEER MEANS TO ME AND A PLEA FOR YOUR HELP

According to Webster’s Dictionary, a “volunteer” is a person who freely offers to take part in an enterprise or undertake a task. I knew the definition of a volunteer but I didn’t practice volunteerism much.

To be upright, I don’t think being a volunteer ever entered my mind much.  I thought I was much too busy to give up my time for anyone or anything else.  If I was to volunteer that would require me giving up a golf game or two a week, or watching my favorite TV shows,  or even giving up a fishing day.  I just couldn’t do that.  I had to take care of real stuff! 

Then over a year ago, I volunteered!  Why? 

Several years ago, I took a new position with the KY Division of Water; Project Manager for the Water Quality Certification Section (WQC).  Although there were many similarities to my previous position, working with the WQC required extensive knowledge of more state and federal agency programs than I had worked with before. 

I was told by my manager and fellow project managers that it would take at least a year before I felt comfortable with all the different agencies, each of their regulations, and how I fit into that picture.  Anyone new to the process wishes there was a program book that describes all the teams and players like at a football game.  Not only did I wish there was a program book, I begged for the play book. This is where finding The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) begins and ultimately becoming a volunteer comes about. 

ASWM provided information to me that was invaluable during my early years as a WQC project manager.  Additionally, ASWM introduced me to the “players” and the “teams”.  They helped me in understanding how the agencies worked together, explaining the different agencies authorities, and where their authorities came from. 

After a few years, I was offered the position of supervisor of the Water Quality Certification Section.  It was during these years as supervisor that ASWM became an irreplaceable source for information and encouragement.  They became a mentor and mediator, they continually provided the right contacts for specific problems, they held conferences/trainings that were the most practical meetings I had attended,  and they brought to the meetings persons of authorities so we could meet with them one on one.  

Needless to say, I have a high opinion of ASWM and all their staff.  Which is why, after retiring I asked Jeanne if she needed a VOLUNTEER. I did not have any idea of what ASWM needed, but soon after I became the Editor of Wetland Breaking News.  I have been editor for over a year and have enjoyed every minute.  

WETLAND BREAKING NEWS NEEDS YOU  

I have greatly enjoyed being Editor but lately my health kept me from doing as good of a job as I want.  For this reason, ASWM is looking for VOLUNTEERS to help with the editors duties.  You may be only able to provide partial duties or you may be able to handle more.  I guarantee you will be getting more than you will be giving.  Please contact Sharon or Jeanne if you can help.  

Wishing you all the best this holiday season,  

Alan Grant, Editor 

Wetland Breaking News  

     
                   

EDITOR'S CHOICE

$1T Spending Deal Aims To Avert Government Shutdown 

Nick Juliano, Manuel Quiñones and Annie Snider – E&E Publishing, LLC – December 10, 2014
Congressional appropriators last night unveiled a $1 trillion spending bill to fund most government agencies through the end of the year, making slight cuts to U.S. EPA while boosting spending at the Departments of Energy and the Interior.

Congress Moving Toward Five-Year Commitment To Continue Great Lakes cleanup 

By Jerry Zremski – Buffalo News – December 9, 2014
The federal government’s big-money commitment to restoring the Great Lakes is now almost certain to continue another five years thanks to House passage Tuesday of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative of 2014. The bill, which passed by voice vote, authorizes $300 million in federal funding for each of the next five years for Great Lakes programs. The legislation, which is expected to be approved by the Senate and sent to President Obama for his signature later this week, establishes a path forward for a program that has brought $1.6 billion to the lakes since 2010. The multi-agency effort has worked to clean up pollution, restore shorelines, combat invasive species and protect fish and wildlife, but Brian Smith, associate executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, said that’s just the start of the work that’s needed. For full story, click here. 

A Paper By Maggie Simpson And Edna Krabappel Was Accepted By Two Scientific
Journals
 

Vox.com – December 7, 2014
A scientific study by Maggie Simpson, Edna Krabappel, and Kim Jong Fun has been accepted by two journals. Of course, none of these fictional characters actually wrote the paper, titled "Fuzzy, Homogeneous Configurations." Rather, it's a nonsensical text, submitted by engineer Alex Smolyanitsky in an effort to expose a pair of scientific journals — the Journal of Computational Intelligence and Electronic Systems and the comic sans-loving Aperito Journal of NanoScience Technology. These outlets both belong to a world of predatory journals that spam thousands of scientists, offering to publish their work — whatever it is — for a fee, without actually conducting peer review. When Smolyanitsky was contacted by them, he submitted the paper, which has a totally incoherent, science-esque text written by SCIgen, a random text generator. (Example sentence: "we removed a 8-petabyte tape drive from our peer-to-peer cluster to prove provably "fuzzy" symmetries’s influence on the work of Japanese mad scientist Karthik Lakshminarayanan.") For full story, click here

This West Antarctic Region Sheds a Mount Everest-sized Amount of Ice Every Two Years, Study Says 

By Terrence McCoy – The Washington Post – December 3, 2014
For centuries, exploration of the remote Amundsen Sea was an exercise in futility. Too distant. Too cold. Too much ice. The first ship didn’t reach the nearby continental shelf until 1774. Then decades later, in the mid-1800s, one voyage commanded by American William Walker of the Flying Fish was repelled by ice and bad weather. A century after that, a report shows there was even less luck when “persistent sea ice cover, thickened by heavy snowfall,” defeated the U.S. Navy’s Eltanin. 

Things, however, are beginning to change — and change faster than anyone anticipated, according to a new study published in the Geophysical Research Letters. Despite its formidable lineage, the Amundsen Sea is widely recognized as the weakest link in the West Antarctic’s splintering chain of ice sheets. But only now is it becoming clear just how fast change is coming. For full story, click here. 

Policy Fight Looms As Agencies Treat Honeybee -- A 17th-Century Import – As Exotic Invader  

Tiffany Stecker – E&E Publishing – December 2, 2014
A bitter feud between beekeepers and federal land managers is coming to a head as the Obama administration prepares plans for stemming a steep decline in pollinators.  Under President Obama's June executive order, federal agencies must submit reports to the White House by Dec. 20 defining how they will address insects and animals that spread pollen from plant to plant. The President's Pollinator Task Force, headed by the Agriculture Department and U.S. EPA, will incorporate those reports into a federal strategy on pollinator protection (Greenwire, June 20). But commercial beekeepers say some land managers are intent on keeping out one of the most important pollinators -- and the only one that makes money while doing so: the European honeybee. For full story, click here. 

Can Biomimicry Tackle Our Toughest Water Problems? 

By Ben Goldfarb – High Country News – November 24, 2014
Kania has spent the last decade trying to correct that imbalance through biomimicry, the concept of imitating natural processes to address environmental problems.  Kania believes there are few ailments that copying nature can’t heal. The dead zones that plague the world’s oceans? Kania has a solution. The disappearance of wetland habitat? There’s a fix. Insect-borne diseases? The common cure for all, he says, lies in Floating Island International’s signature technology: buoyant artificial wetlands, nearly 6,000 of which are now deployed worldwide, from New Zealand to South Africa to China. For full story, click here
 

The Russia-USA Wetland Center Exchange Program: Linking People and Wetlands
Seeks Wetland Centers for Project Participation

Wetlands Institute
Having been awarded a grant through the US State Department's US-Russia Peer-to-Peer Dialogue Program, The Wetlands Institute (TWI), Wetland Link International (WLI) and Wetlands International Russia (WIR) have teamed up to generate a beneficial international dialogue between wetland centers in the US and Russia. This project, Russia-USA Wetland Center Exchange Program: Linking People and Wetlands, seeks to identify the shared challenges of those working in wetland education and outreach throughout the US and Russia and assemble cases of best practice and delivery. This project is currently seeking six (6) wetland centers, divided equally between the US and Russia, to participate in an international exchange program and conference, develop a proven methodology for use of social media, data sharing and outreach materials, and produce a final manual for advising wetland centers on the best practices for public education and engagement as they pertain to wetland education. For complete project details and to download participant applications, click here. Applications must be received by Friday, January 16, 2015. 
 

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Green Infrastructure in Oklahoma: Insights & Lessons Learned – January 6, 2015 

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Green Infrastructure in Oklahoma: Insights & Lessons Learned will be held on January 6, 2015 - 3:00 p.m. ET.  Presented by Ronald D. Flanagan, CFM & Principal Planner, R.D. Flanagan & Associates, LLC. To register, click here. 

ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Temperate and Tropical/Subtropical Seagrass Restoration  January 20, 2015  

Wetland Restoration Webinar: Temperate and Tropical/Subtropical Seagrass Restoration will be held on January 20, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Robin Lews, Lewis Environmental Services, Inc. & Coastal Resource Group, Inc. and Mark Fonseca, CSA Ocean Sciences. For more information, click here. To register, click here. 

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors January 21, 2015 

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors will be held on January 21, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. Presented by Richard A. Weber, P.E., Wetland Hydraulic Engineer, NRCS. For more information, click here. To register, click here. 

ASWM’s Members’ Webinar: How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message January 28, 2015 

Members’ Webinar: How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message will be held on January 28, 2015. Presented by Karen L. McKee, Ph.D, Scientist Emeritus, U.S. Geological Survey. 

This is a two-part webinar, with both sessions offered on January 28, 2015 

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. ET
Webinar Part 1: Demystifying the Science Filmmaking Process   

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. ET 
Webinar Part 2: An Introduction to Science Videography   

Videography skills will become increasingly important for the scientist, resource manager, and consultant to keep pace with the rapid changes in communication technology and audience expectations for media-rich information. Have you wanted to use video to convey a science message but were reluctant to try because video making seems difficult, time-consuming, and expensive? This two-part webinar is designed to demystify the filmmaking process and introduce participants to science videography. For more information, click here.

NATIONAL NEWS

Scientist With Deep Industry Ties Being Considered For Key EPA Job

By David Heath – The Center for Public Integrity – December 9, 2014
A scientist with deep ties to the chemical industry is one of two finalists to lead the office at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that determines which chemicals can make people sick, and in what doses. Michael Dourson is being considered to direct the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), whose scientific reports are used by the EPA and states to draft regulations to rid air, water or soil of toxic chemicals. For full story, click here. 

ALEC Looks To Shred EPA Regulations 

By Naureen Khan – Aljazeera America – December 5, 2014
The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) forged ahead with a new agenda at a D.C. Hyatt this week. Despite an exodus of corporate sponsors, who have balked at its policies and tactics, the nonprofit honed plans to dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, roll back energy regulations and give the stage to climate change deniers. For full story, click here. 

House Republican Plans to Introduce Pro-Climate-Science Bill 

By Ben Geman – National Journal – December 5, 2014
A Republican House member is battling the skepticism toward climate-change science that's common in GOP ranks. And he wants to put lawmakers on record in the process. Rep. Chris Gibson said Thursday he plans to introduce a resolution on climate change that will help others "recognize the reality" of the situation. Gibson said the extreme weather he has witnessed in his own upstate New York district supports the science, and he wants to be a leader in spurring recognition of changing weather patterns. For full story, click here.

US EPA Fighting Order To Decide On Gulf Of Mexico 'Dead Zone' Rule-Making 

By Jennifer Larino – NOLA.com - The Times Picayune  December 4, 2014
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency wants the federal appeals court in New Orleans to overturn an order that forces the EPA to decide whether federal rules are needed to curb the flow of pollutants into the Mississippi River. The pollutants ultimately feed a low-oxygen "dead zone" along Louisiana's coast each spring.  At a Thursday hearing before the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, federal attorneys told a three-judge panel that the EPA -- not the courts -- is responsible for setting priorities for water quality and other issues. The agency argued that the lower-court order allows the rule-making process to "be whipsawed back and forth" by interest groups. For full story, click here

Record Drought Reveals Stunning Changes Along Colorado River 

By Jonathan Waterman – National Geographic News – November 23, 2014 – Video
In early September, at the abandoned Piute Farms marina on a remote edge of southern Utah's Navajo reservation, we watched a ten-foot (three-meter) waterfall plunging off what used to be the end of the San Juan River. Until 1990, this point marked the smooth confluence of the river with Lake Powell, one of the largest reservoirs in the U.S. But the lake has shrunk so much due to the recent drought that this waterfall has emerged, with sandy water as thick as a milkshake. For full story and to view video, click here. 

Long-Eared Bat Listing Gets Pushback 

By Kevin Duffy – The Great Lakes Echo – November 21, 2014
A fight over logging restrictions is delaying federal protection of the northern long-eared bat, a Great Lakes species already decimated in the American Northeast. An endangered or threatened listing of the bat has been pushed to April. The Fish and Wildlife Service, which has federal jurisdiction over protected species, is using the time to respond to the unexpected controversy, said Mollie Matteson, senior scientist and a bat disease specialist at the Center for Biological Diversity.  Forest industry officials worry a federal listing will hinder logging. They propose state-enforced operational guidelines as an alternative. For full story, click here. 

Debate Churns As NOAA Is Set To Open U.S. Waters To Aquaculture 

Emily Yehle – E&E Publishing, LLC – November 20, 2014
Giant cages float off the shores of Hawaii, housing hundreds of thousands of yellowtail snapper in the deep waters of the Pacific. 

The so-called Hawaiian Kampachi spend about one year in their net pens before they're put on ice and sold to restaurants and wholesalers in the United States and abroad. They are a rare breed: the product of one of the few open-water fish farms in the United States. 

They may not keep that status for long. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is on the verge of setting a regulatory system and allowing as many as 20 permits for farms in the Gulf of Mexico, in what supporters hope is the seed of a nationwide industry. For full story, click here

EPA to Assist Water Utilities in Bolstering Climate Resilience & Readiness 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – November 19, 2014
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is providing up to $600,000 in training and technical assistance to help water utilities in more than 20 communities bolster their climate change resilience and readiness. Drinking water, wastewater and stormwater utilities will participate in a multi-year program to prepare for potential impacts from climate change. Challenges include droughts, more intense and frequent storms, flooding, sea-level rise and changes to water quality. Communities will receive technical assistance in using EPA's Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool, software that helps users identify assets, threats and adaptation options to help reduce risk from climate change. Learn more here. 

Congress Holds Hearing On Algae Contamination Of Lake Erie Drinking Water

By Sabrina Eaton – Cleveland.com – November 19, 2014
A Lake Erie algae outbreak this summer that rendered Toledo area tap water undrinkable spurred a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Wednesday to examine what's being done to address problems. 

Subcommittee members including Bowling Green Republican Rep. Bob Latta called on the federal, state and local governments to work together to better understand the science, and human effects of algae contamination. 

"There is no single smoking gun that leads to algae-based toxin in drinking water," said Illinois Republican Rep. John Shimkus, chairman of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy. "There are still plenty of things we don't know about this subject." 

Ohio Environmental Protection Agency director Craig Butler said the state is "working on many different fronts" to respond to the problem.  For full story, click here.   

Concerns Renewed as Mining Pollutants Increase in Montana Watershed 

By Tristan Scott  Flathead Beacon  November 17, 2014
With renewed plans to expand coal-mining operations in southeastern British Columbia’s Elk River drainage, located upstream from one of Montana’s world-class transboundary watersheds, researchers and government agencies are intensifying scrutiny on environmental hazards spanning the border. The concerns center on increasing amounts of coal waste byproducts leaching into the heavily mined Elk River and its many tributaries, which drain into two bodies of water shared by B.C. and Montana – Lake Koocanusa and the Kootenai River – both of which are showing increased levels of mining contaminants like selenium in the muscle tissue of fish species. For full story, click here.

 

STATE NEWS

AK: As sea level rises, an Alaska village faces an existential dilemma 

By Duff Wilson Thomson – Reuters Foundation – November 24, 2014
The Chukchi Sea's unrelenting waves were slowly ripping away the land and homes of the 600 or so residents of this Alaska Native village on a sinking barrier island. U.S. government reports determined that the community was "imminently threatened" with inundation and needed "immediate action" to move to safer ground on the mainland. Villagers voted 161-20 to relocate off the island. Shishmaref, the media proclaimed, would be the United States' first climate refugees. That was in 2002. 

More than a decade later, the U.S. government has yet to come up with a new location. Shishmaref has stayed put, protected temporarily by a $19 million rock revetment that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers finished in 2009. 

"You almost have to be half the way dead to get help," said Clifford Weyiouanna, former chair of a relocation coalition. For full story, click here. 

AK: Federal judge sides with Pebble to halt EPA mine action for now 

By Lisa Demer – Alaska Dispatch News – November 24, 2014
A federal judge on Monday ruled in favor of the Pebble mine project and put a temporary halt on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to protect Bristol Bay. The ruling is a “procedural victory,” but it doesn’t settle Pebble’s claims that EPA overstepped the law, Tom Collier, Pebble Ltd. Partnership CEO, said Monday afternoon in a written statement. It will take months more to resolve the lawsuit at issue, Pebble said. Activists fighting the mine noted that U.S. District Judge Russel Holland rejected two of Pebble’s three arguments to halt EPA over a theory that it colluded with anti-mine activists and scientists. Rather, the judge determined that Pebble had a chance of winning on one claim, that EPA improperly turned to an anti-mine team as it worked on its study of how a big mine would affect the Bristol Bay watershed. For full story, click here

CA:  Animal deaths spike on Sierra roads as drought hits habitat 

By Peter Fimrite – SFGATE – December 8, 2014
Motorists in the Sierra have been plowing into deer, bear and a variety of other large hoofed and pawed creatures in unprecedented numbers, according to state transportation and wildlife officials. Bears and deer in particular have been loping across roads and highways this fall, apparently searching for scarce food, according to a rare joint public warning issued by Caltrans and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. For full story, click here

CA: Los Angeles, City of Water 

By Jacques Leslie – The New York Times – December 6, 2014
Los Angeles is the nation’s water archvillain, according to public perception, notorious for its usurpation of water hundreds of miles away to slake the thirst of its ever-expanding population. As a character in “Chinatown,” the noirish 1974 film starring Jack Nicholson that churns through the city’s water history, puts it, “Either you bring the water to L.A., or you bring L.A. to the water.” Recently, however, Los Angeles has reduced its reliance on outside sources of water. It has become, of all things, a leader in sustainable water management, a pioneer in big-city use of cost-effective, environmentally beneficial water conservation, collection and reuse technologies. Some combination of these techniques is the most plausible path to survival for all the cities of the water-depleted West. For full story, click here. 

CA: Annenberg pulls $45 million for Ballona Wetlands redevelopment 

By Sandy Mazza  Daily Breeze  December 2, 2014
The Annenberg Foundation withdrew its proposal Tuesday for up to $45 million in funding to help redevelop one of Los Angeles County’s last remaining natural wetlands in Playa del Rey. The proposal would have brought much needed funds to redevelop Ballona Wetlands, a 640-acre expanse of undeveloped marshland that has suffered from decades of environmental degradation due to surrounding urban sprawl: sports fields, homeless encampments and recreational activities. But it faced strong opposition because Wallis Annenberg included a controversial caveat that called for a 46,000-square-foot interpretive center and pet adoption center surrounded by walking trails and other public spaces. For full story, click here. 

CA: Drought revives 'forgotten art' at wineries: Farming without irrigation 

By David Pierson – LA Times – November 22, 2014
The gnarled zinfandel grapevines on Rich Czapleski's land have borne fruit for more than 100 years, producing dark, intense wines that exemplify the special growing conditions in this coveted winemaking region. Over that time, the vines have weathered some of California's worst droughts — including the last three years with little difficulty. For full story, click here. 

CO: Colorado weighs taking "waste" out of wastewater to fix shortfall 

By Bruce Finley – The Denver Post – November 23, 2014
Colorado water providers facing a shortfall of 163 billion gallons are turning to a long-ignored resource: wastewater. 

They're calculating that, if even the worst sewage could be cleaned to the point it is safe to drink — filtered through super-fine membranes or constructed wetlands, treated with chemicals, zapped with ultraviolet rays — then the state's dwindling aquifers and rivers could be saved. 

Colorado officials at work on the first statewide water plan to sustain population and industrial growth recognize reuse as an option. For full story, click here. 

GA: Human tests suggest contamination from Superfund site stretches 25 miles 

By Michale Hall – The Brunswick News – December 1, 2014
Removing the pollution in the estuary that has been slated for cleanup at the former LCP Chemical Site should be as simple as removing the poisoned sections of marsh, something that could have been done two decades ago according to the director of a local environmental group. But the proposed plan for the federal Superfund Site by the Environmental Protection Agency released recently that includes dredging seven acres of ditches, capping six acres of a creek and placing a thin cover of sand over 11 acres will not remove the source of the poison that has seeped into the Turtle River and surrounding creeks, said Daniel Parshley, executive director of the Glynn Environmental Coalition. For full story, click here.

KY: Kentucky regulators defend mining record 

By James Bruggers – The Courier-Journal – November 18, 2014
Kentucky environmental regulators on Tuesday fought back against charges from four environmental groups that they missed as many as 28,000 clean-water violations at a dozen surface-mining complexes in eastern Kentucky. State officials had already identified new clean-water violations that were described Friday in a threatened lawsuit by environmentalists against Frasure Creek Mining, said R. Bruce Scott, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, on Tuesday. For full story, click here. 

LA: Louisiana restoration projects should get top priority with BP oil spill fine money, environmental groups say 

By Mark Schleifstein – Nola.com The Times-Picayume – December 10, 2014
Rebuilding Louisiana's coast, including the rapidly eroding Mississippi River delta, should be the main use of billions of dollars in expected BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill fine and restoration money, according to two reports released Tuesday by the National Wildlife Federation and a coalition of national and Louisiana environmental groups. "We already have a massive land loss crisis in Louisiana, so time is not on our side," said David Muth, Gulf Program director with the National Wildlife Federation, during a Tuesday teleconference. "We need to move forward and move forward quickly." For full story, click here. 

LA: Texas oil company pleads guilty to dumping wastewater into Gulf 

By David Hammer – 4WWL TV – November 21, 2014
A Texas oil company has pleaded guilty to knowingly dumping oily wastewater into the Gulf near Plaquemines Parish for more than two years, saving it $1.5 million in disposal costs in the process, according to federal court documents. 

Xplor Energy SPV-1 Inc. agreed to pay a $3.1 million fine, admitting in a plea deal that it knew about faulty lines that leaked oil and brine into Breton Sound, and also knew that the wells it was using to dispose of oil-production waste products under the seabed were not actually big enough to hold all of the pollutants being injected into them. For full story, click here.

ME: US waters create potential for shellfish farming 

By Lonnie Shekhtman  The Boston Globe  November 23, 2014
By the time the sun rose on a chilly November morning, Matthew Moretti and his two-man crew had steamed into Casco Bay, tying up alongside three square rafts bobbing in calm waters. Clambering onto the planks, they began hauling 35-foot ropes from the deep, each laden with hundreds of pounds of slate-gray mussels. “Demand is huge for rope-grown mussel,” said Moretti, co-owner of Wild Ocean Aquaculture, which grows and sells the branded Bangs Island Mussels. “It’s way bigger than we have been able to fill.” Moretti’s business represents what marine biologists, federal officials, and some fishermen say may be the future of New England’s seafood industry, one that increasingly raises, rather than catches, shellfish and finfish. With the appetite for seafood growing, even as regulators impose tighter catch limits, researchers and policy makers are looking for ways to expand aquaculture and tap into a growing global market for seafood.For full story, click here. 

MD: Hogan vows to fight farm pollution rules 

By Timothy B. Wheeler – The Baltimore Sun – December 8, 2014
Gov.-elect Larry Hogan promised Maryland farmers Monday that his "first fight" in office would be against costly new farm pollution regulations, even as environmental groups released new data showing many Eastern Shore chicken farms could be fouling the Chesapeake Bay. Speaking to the Maryland Farm Bureau's annual convention in Ocean City, Hogan indicated he would weaken or reverse controversial rules proposed last month by Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration. The rules, which could take effect just before Hogan takes office Jan. 21, would curtail Shore farmers' widespread use of poultry manure as fertilizer. For full blog post, click here

MD: Counties' ambitious stream restoration projects stir debate 

By Timothy B. Wheeler – The Baltimore Sun – November 16, 2014 – Video
Whitemarsh Run looks a mess, more a construction site than a stream. With its flow temporarily dammed and diverted, a track hoe is carving out a new, more sinuous channel for the badly degraded waterway running through a built-up patch of northeastern Baltimore County. New banks are being built, armored in places with granite boulders — all part of a $13 million makeover that's intended to help clean up the nearby Bird River and the Chesapeake Bay. Bits of the 11/2- mile long project that have been completed look like a tranquil country stream, its water sliding across stones placed along and in its channel. But some scientists and environmentalists question whether such feats of ecological engineering, by themselves, can really revive a dead stream, or even reduce pollution much.  For full story and to view video, click here.

MN: The border war over cleaned-up Lake Hendricks 

By Tony Kennedy – Star Tribune – December 1, 2014
Mayor Jay Nelson hoisted a pair of six-packs from the local microbrewery and explained the civic renaissance taking place across his town. Lively shops line Main Street, soon to be joined by the first new movie theater in Lincoln County in 42 years. The local hospital is getting a $5 million expansion, and 17 new homes were built in 2014. 

Nelson traces this decade of progress to the town’s painstaking and expensive campaign to clean up Lake Hendricks, the centerpiece of this eclectic community in southwestern Minnesota. “There’s a circle of life that takes place in our town, and everything revolves around the quality of our lake water,” the mayor said. “We’ve made tremendous strides.” 

For now, though, the good news is on hold. 

Nelson and other leaders of this old Norwegian settlement say their efforts are now threatened by a giant 4,000-cow dairy farm proposed just across the border in South Dakota, on top of the area’s highest hill. For full story, click here.

MT: Not-so-wild wilderness: Mining proposals threaten Cabinet Mountains streams, lakes and grizzlies 

By Rich Landers – The Spokesman-Review – November 23, 2014
Hiking the 4-mile trail into Rock Lake from the Noxon, Montana, area weighed heavy on Jim Costello, especially after he met a budding family from Spokane. The couple were packing their toddler along the soothing rumble of Rock Creek for his first wilderness experience. 

He asked Jim and JoJo Lindenfelser if they’d heard of the Rock Creek Mine. They said no. He suggested they check into it. 

“Have a good day,” said Costello, who with his wife, Mary Crowe Costello, form the foundation of the Rock Creek Alliance and SaveOurCabinets.org. 

“This is the most popular route into the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness,” he said later. “Yet most people have no idea they could soon be driving past a huge mining operation to get here. They don’t know about the noise, or that the creek could be dry and the lake could be much lower.” For full story, click here.

NJ: Stockton College and the Wetlands Institute formalize partnership 

nbc40.net  December 4, 2014  Video
"It's a win for the state of New Jersey and the students and people of New Jersey." It's a relationship that has existed for years, but now that it's formalized, officials from the Wetlands Institute and the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey are looking forward to many possibilities. "It enables us to continue to work with them on terrapin conservation, they do the head starting of the baby diamond back terrapins there," said Dr. Lenore Tedesco, Executive Director of the Wetlands Institute. "So by us linking with the Wetlands Institute it gives us the opportunity to expand our research and expand our teaching," said Dr. Dennis Weiss, Dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Stockton. Both Stockton and the Wetlands Institute also plan to work together on restoration projects and open the doors to more than just science majors. For full story and to view video, click here. 

NC: NOAA, UNC-Wilmington study finds warming Atlantic ocean temperatures could increase expansion of invasive, native species 

NOAA  September 15, 2014
According to a recent study, warming water temperatures due to climate change could expand the range of many native species of tropical fish, including the invasive and poisonous lionfish. Researchers from NOAA and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington examined 40 species along rocky and artificial reefs off North Carolina. Researchers combined year-round bottom water temperature data with 2006-2010 fish community surveys in water depths from 15 to 150 feet off the coast of North Carolina. The study revealed that the fish community was primarily tropical in the deeper areas surveyed, from 122 to 150 feet, with a winter mean temperature of 21 degrees Celsius (69.8 degrees Fahrenheit). However, many of these native tropical fishes, usually abundant in shallow, somewhat cooler reefs, tended to remain in the deeper, warmer water, suggesting that temperature is a main factor in controlling their distribution. The findings were published in the September issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series. For more information, click here. 

OH: Ohio House passes anti-algae bill limiting manure, fertilizer on farms 

By Jim Provance – The Blade – November 20, 2014
The Ohio House overwhelmingly approved new restrictions on the application of manure and other fertilizers on farmland as one step to reduce harmful algae blooms on Lake Erie. The sweeping bill also would allow telecommunications companies to back away from their commitment to maintain basic land-line telephone service as they pursue expansion of broadband and wireless alternatives. It sets new penalties for abuses by hydraulic fracturing operations that are stronger than current law but weaker than what Gov. John Kasich initially proposed. For full story, click here. 

OH: Lake Erie water bill would set controversial environmental standards 

By Jeremy Pelzer – Cleveland.com – November 18, 2014
Ohio lawmakers are again seeking to set standards for cities and businesses to consume large amounts of water from Lake Erie and its tributaries. Conservation groups claim the measure, currently awaiting a final vote in the Ohio House of Representatives, would violate the 2008 Great Lakes Compact and could harm wildlife, cause more algal blooms, and lower water levels in rivers and streams. For full story, click here.

TX: Map shows future of Mustang and Padre islands as sea levels rise 

By Nadia Tamex-Robledo – Caller Times – November 29, 2014
On the bay side of Mustang Island, away from the crowds that set up on the beach, nature lovers have peaceful spots to launch their kayaks or go fishing. 

But as sea levels rise, shorelines erode and development near wetlands continues, scientists and conservationists project those prime waterfront locations won’t be around — at least in their current form — for generations down the road. 

An analysis by a Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies team, led by James Gibeaut, from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, shows where Mustang and Padre islands wetlands will move during the next 60 years as rising sea levels turn those current habitats into open water. They created geohazard maps to illustrate the changes and help local governments plan around the changes. For full story, click here. 

TX: Scientists look to reverse sea turtle's sudden decline 

By Harvey Rice – Houston Chronicle – November 19, 2014
The sudden decline of Texas' official sea turtle was unexpected and may indicate pollution is making the Gulf of Mexico a difficult place for species like the Kemp's ridley to survive, experts said Wednesday. 

"The Kemp's ridley turtle might be a great canary in the coal mine for the Gulf of Mexico," said Thane Wibbels, speaking at the Second International Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Symposium. 

Wibbels, a biologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is among 15 to 20 scientists and federal officials who plan to meet Thursday to digest information from the two-day symposium and decide what to do about the unexpected decline in the Kemp's ridley, the world's most endangered sea turtle, after more than a decade of steady gains. 

Scientific research presented on the Kemp's ridley raised the possibility that the 2010 BP oil spill, the largest in U.S. history, might have contributed to the declines of sea turtle nests in 2013 and 2014, which have alarmed scientists. For full story, click here.

TX: Report: EPA Power Plan Would Save Texas Water 

By Jim Malewitz – The Texas Tribune – November 19, 2014
As state regulators fret about how President Obama’s effort to combat climate change would affect the Texas power grid, a new study says the rules would be simpler to adopt than those regulators suggest – and that it would save the state billions of gallons of water annually. In an analysis released Wednesday, CNA Corporation, a nonprofit research group based in Arlington, Va., said the federal proposal – which requires states to shift from coal power to cut carbon emissions – would slash water use in the Texas power sector by 21 percent. That would save the drought-ridden state more than 28 billion gallons of water each year. For full story, click here. 

WA: Mammoth $342 million cleanup ahead for fouled Duwamish River 

By Craig Welch – The Seattle Times – December 2, 2014
For a century, we have straightened, poisoned, dug, soiled, filled and recontaminated the Duwamish River, the freshwater corridor that transformed Seattle into a major port city.

We buried old trucks and tossed in piles of oil-soaked tires. We dumped carcinogenic lubricants and coolants down drains and let solvents seep deep into its muddy bottom. 

But on Tuesday — after 14 years of research and planning — the federal government unveiled a final $342 million cleanup plan that officials insist should rid the beleaguered waterway of 90 percent of its pollution. 

The full effort will take nearly two decades, with costs borne by Boeing, King County, and the city of Seattle and the Port of Seattle. For full story, click here.

WA: Nitrates, fecal coliform from dairies linked to tainted shellfish, tap water 

By Jeff Burnside – KOMO News.com – November 21, 2014 – Video
Shellfish, swimming beaches, and the tap water for thousands of people in certain areas of Washington state are being contaminated by pollutants running off farms, and critics say dairy cows are the chief culprit, according to a KOMO 4 Problem Solvers investigation. Government regulators are failing to halt that pollution largely because of insufficient laws, pressure from the agriculture industry and too little enforcement, the Problem Solvers review found. Voluntary compliance and good intentions from many dairy farmers have not been enough to prevent dangerous contaminates generated by manure from getting into waters of Washington state. For full story and to view video, click here. 

WA: Death by dirty water: Storm runoff a risk for fish 

By Phuong Le  AP: The Big Story  November 17, 2014
Just hours into the experiment, the prognosis was grim for salmon that had been submerged in rain runoff collected from one of Seattle's busiest highways. One by one, the fish were removed from a tank filled with coffee-colored water and inspected: They were rigid. Their typically red gills were gray. "He's way dead," David Baldwin, a research zoologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, declared at the four-hour mark. This was the fate of coho salmon exposed to the everyday toxic brew of dirt, metals, oil and other gunk that washes off highway pavement after rains and directly into Puget Sound. For full story, click here.

WV: Former Freedom Industries president facing federal charges 

By Ashley B. Craig – Charleston Daily Mail – December 8, 2014
Eleven months after his company contaminated the drinking water of 300,000 West Virginians, former Freedom Industries President Gary Southern is facing federal charges. 

Southern is charged with bankruptcy fraud, false oath in a bankruptcy case and wire fraud, according to a criminal complaint filed in U.S. District Court Monday. If convicted, he could face up to 30 years in prison. 

FBI investigators believe Southern lied in his testimony during bankruptcy hearings surrounding the former Freedom Industries, which was bought by Chemstream Holdings in December 2013, to minimize his involvement with the company and to protect his own assets. For full story, click here.

WI: Study: Wisconsin groundwater contaminated by coal ash 

By Kari Lydersen – Midwest Energy News – November 18, 2014
The “beneficial reuse” of coal ash, often touted as a way to keep the material out of landfills, is potentially causing serious contamination of drinking water in southeast Wisconsin and possibly across the state, according to a report released Tuesday by Clean Wisconsin. By classifying coal ash as an “industrial byproduct,” as report author Tyson Cook says, companies are able to place contaminant-laden coal ash in the ground — as structural fill in and below roads, trails, parking lots, buildings, and bridges — with no lining or monitoring. For full story, click here. 

 

WETLAND SCIENCE

California Drought The Worst In 1,200 Years, New Study Says 

By Paul Rogers  San Jose Mercury News  December 5, 2014
The last three years of drought were the most severe that California has experienced in at least 1,200 years, according to a new scientific study published Thursday. The study provides the state with breathtaking new historical context for its low reservoirs and sinking water tables, even as California celebrated its first good soaking of the season. For full story, click here

Council on Environmental Quality Releases: "President's State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience: Recommendations to the President" 

The White House Council on Environmental Quality  November 17, 2014
As part of the Administration's overall effort to combat climate change, President Obama is committed to ensuring that U.S. communities thrive in the face of a changing climate. The Administration has made significant investments in resilient disaster recovery in the wake of extreme weather events, ensuring that rebuilding and infrastructure projects factor in climate impacts, such as sea-level rise, and invest in making transit systems more resilient to flooding and extreme weather. Last year, as part of his Climate Action Plan, the President established the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience. The Task Force is comprised of Governors, Mayors, county executives and Tribal leaders from throughout the U.S. who are experiencing climate change impacts. Task Force leaders have taken bold action to protect their communities by investing in more resilient infrastructure, updating building codes, adjusting the way they manage natural resources, and planning for rapid recovery from extreme weather events. To access a fact sheet summarizing recommendations from the Task Force, as well as the recommendations document, click here

Studies Show 2-Degree Climate Goal Is Daunting, but Not Impossible 

By John H. Cushman, Jr.  Inside Climate News  November 26, 2014
Three recent reports, each a comprehensive look at the climate crisis and possible paths out of it, provide the latest evidence that the barriers to reducing greenhouse gas emissions are daunting, but not insurmountable. One report comes from the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP); one from the World Bank; and one from a consortium that includes two United States' national laboratories. Together, they illustrate the concerted effort by various schools of climate analysis to promote a global treaty in Paris next year. All echo themes presented in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's fifth assessment report, issued over the past year. For full story, click here

Planning for Climate Change in Michigan Coastal Wetlands 

By Michael Murray  National Wildlife Federation Blog  November 4, 2014
How will Great Lakes coastal wetlands fare in a changing climate? While many uncertainties remain about potential climate change impacts in the Great Lakes, it is clear that coastal areas may be subject to a diverse set of impacts, ranging from warmer water temperatures, significant water level changes, generally decreased ice cover, and increased spring storm events. For full story, click here

EPA Releases Agency-Wide Climate Change Adaptation Plans 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
On October 31, 2014, EPA released the final versions of its Agency-wide Climate Change Adaptation Plan (PDF, 64pp, 1.7mb) and the 17 Climate Change Adaptation Implementation Plans produced by the Program and Regional Offices. These final versions were revised from earlier drafts following public comment periods. They respond to directives in Executive Order 13653 - Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change (PDF, 8pp, 325kb). The final EPA Plan and the 17 Implementation Plans are living documents that will be periodically revised in subsequent years to account for new knowledge, data, scientific evidence, and lessons learned from the Agency’s ongoing efforts to integrate climate adaptation planning into its programs, policies, rules and operations. To download the Plans, click here

Scientists Find Likely Culprit Behind Mysterious Sea Star Deaths 

By Deborah Netburn – Los Angeles Times – November 26, 2014
In the slippery tide pools of San Pedro’s Point Fermin, there are sticky green sea anemone, hard-shelled limpets, barnacles shaped like mini-volcanoes and even small octopuses hiding between gaps in the rocks. 

Noticeably missing from this coastal menagerie are the icons of the rocky intertidal zone — the sea stars.  Not long ago, as many as 80 orange and purple sea stars could be found at Point Fermin, say biologists who have been monitoring the spot for more than a decade. But over the last 18 months, scientists all along the Pacific Coast have witnessed the largest die-off of sea stars ever recorded. Their armored bodies seem to simply disintegrate in the face of a mysterious sickness dubbed sea star wasting disease. Now researchers believe they know what’s behind the disease that has decimated sea star populations as far north as southern Alaska and as far south as Baja California. Through a combination of microbiology and old-fashioned detective work, they deduced that the likely culprit is a virus similar to one found in cockroaches and sea urchins. For full story, click here.

Top Uses for Remote Sensing In Conservation 

By Kevin Duffy – Great Lakes Echo – December 1, 2014
Scientists from NASA, the Wildlife Conservation Society, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other organizations recently identified the top ways to boost awareness of global conservation with satellites and drones. The study, “Ten Ways Remote Sensing Can Contribute to Conservation,” appears in the latest issue of the scientific journal, Conservation Biology. It investigates the application of remote technologies like satellites to answering questions of global conservation, including wildlife protection and agricultural land development. For full story, click here.

Scientists Turn To Crowdfunding Sites for Research Money 

By Reid Frazier – Michigan Radio – December 2, 2014Federal spending on scientific research hasn’t kept up with inflation in recent years, and it’s made it harder for researchers to fund their work. Some of them are turning to another source: crowdfunding. But this funding source raises new questions for scientists.   

Susan Nagel, a researcher at the University of Missouri, studies the health impacts of chemicals used in fracking. Last year, she found remnants of these chemicals in Colorado streams near where fracking spills had occurred.  

“So, this was an initial study and we found this kind of strong association,” says Nagel.

But she wanted to go farther, and confirm her results with more testing. Her grant application with the National Institutes of Health, however, sat in limbo — for months.

So she turned to crowdfunding. Nagel set up a project page on the crowdfunding website experiment.com, complete with a video explaining why her research on fracking chemicals is important. 

It worked. She raised $25,000 and was able to begin a follow-up study. Research like Nagel’s is the latest destination for online donors looking to back projects they like.  For full story, click here.

Major Deltas 'Could Be Drowned' 

By Victoria Gill – BBC News Science & Environment – December 3, 2014
Sea-level rise and river engineering "spell disaster" for many of the world's river deltas, say scientists.

Half a billion people live in deltas, but the newly published research suggests many of these areas are set to be inundated by rising seas. 

Some of the lowest lying, including the Mekong and Mississippi, are particularly vulnerable. 

The paper is published in the journal Nature

Lead researcher Dr Liviu Giosan, from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, said dams and other river engineering had exacerbated the problem by reducing the amount of sediment rivers could carry. 

In an article he said was "a call to action before it's too late", Dr Giosan said rivers were losing the fight between land and sea. For full story, click here.

The Man With The Salmon Plan 

By Dan Egan – Journal Sentinel – December 7, 2014
The author of the bumper sticker maxim that "A Bad Day Fishing is Better than a Good Day Working" never sat on the shore of Lake Huron with Jay Hall during the fall salmon run. For full article, click here.

More Japanese Tsunami Debris Will Wash Up This Winter On Northwest Shores,
Scientists Predict
 

By Jes Burns – Earth Fix – December 8, 2014
Winter storms off the Oregon and Washington coastlines are expected to bring a new wave of debris from the 2011 tsunami in Japan. Scientists say objects are already washing ashore – with potentially invasive organisms riding along. In March, 2011 an earthquake and tsunami devastated a large swath of eastern Japan. The tsunami reached heights of over 100 feet in some places, washing large quantities of manmade materials out to sea. Japanese officials estimate that about 1.5 million tons of debris floated out into the Pacific. For full story, click here.

US Names Red Knot Bird A Threatened Species 

By Michael Catalini – Philly.com – December 9, 2014
A rust-colored shorebird known for a nearly 20,000-mile migration will now receive federal protection, setting the stage for states to coordinate preservation plans for the dwindling species.

After a 14-month review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the rufa subspecies of the red knot as threatened on Tuesday. Under the Endangered Species Act, the ruling prohibits killing, shooting, hunting or otherwise harming the bird. For full story, click here.

Closing In On ALS? Link Between Lethal Disease And Algae Explored 

By Lindsey Konkel – Environmental Health News – December 11, 2014
Now Gilmore can no longer swim, fish or surf, let alone button a shirt or lift a fork to his mouth. Earlier this year, he was diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

In New England, medical researchers are now uncovering clues that appear to link some cases of the lethal neurological disease to people’s proximity to lakes and coastal waters.

About five years ago, doctors at a New Hampshire hospital noticed a pattern in their ALS patients – many of them, like Gilmore, lived near water. Since then, researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center have identified several ALS hot spots in lake and coastal communities in New England, and they suspect that toxic blooms of blue-green algae – which are becoming more common worldwide – may play a role. For full story, click here.

 

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

U.S. EPA 'Climate Change Indicators in the United States, 2014' report 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  2014
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released the third edition of a report, 'Climate Change Indicators in the United States.' The report presents observed data on key measures of our environment, including U.S. and global temperature and precipitation, ocean heat and ocean acidity, sea level, length of growing season, and many others. With 30 indicators that include over 80 maps and graphs showing long-term trends, the report demonstrates that climate change is already affecting our environment and our society.  

The third edition of the Indicators report adds additional years of data and four new indicators: Lyme disease, heating and cooling degree days, wildfires, and water level and temperature in the Great Lakes. In addition, the report adds four new features that connect observed data records to local communities and areas of interest, including cherry blossom bloom dates in Washington D.C., timing of ice breakup in two Alaskan rivers, temperature and drought in the Southwest, and land loss along the mid-Atlantic coast.  

EPA compiles decades of observed data in cooperation with a range of federal government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and other institutions. The Indicators report focuses on long-term trends for key measures of our environment for which high-quality data exist. Each indicator and the report itself were peer-reviewed by independent experts, and extensive technical documentation accompanies the report.  

To order a FREE copy of the report, send a request with your mailing address included to mailto:climateindicators@epa.gov. 

To find more information about the Climate Change Indicators report, or to download a PDF copy, click here.  

Report Explains Extreme Events of 2013 from Climate Perspective 

American Meteorological Society  September 2014
A report released by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society investigates the causes of a wide variety of extreme weather and climate events from around the world in 2013. In the report, "Explaining Extreme Events of 2013 from a Climate Perspective," 20 different research groups explored the causes of 16 different events that occurred in 2013. The findings indicate that human-caused climate change greatly increased the risk for the extreme heat waves assessed in this report. To access the full report, click here

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Releases Fifth Synthesis Report 

IPCC  
Key findings of the Synthesis Report recently released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) include: Human influence on the climate system is clear and growing, with impacts observed on all continents. If left unchecked, climate change will increase the likelihood of severe, pervasive, and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems. However, options are available to adapt to climate change, and implementing stringent mitigation activities can ensure that the impacts of climate change remain within a manageable range, creating a brighter and more sustainable future. The Synthesis Report distills and integrates the findings of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report produced by over 800 scientists and released over the past 13 months. To access the Synthesis Report and other reports from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, click here.
 


POTPOURRI

Organic Farming More Drought Resistant: Report 

By Robert Ferris – CNBC – December 9, 2014
When it comes to groceries, "organic" and "sustainable" usually mean "expensive." But the supposed productivity gaps between organic and conventional farming may be a lot smaller than thought—and organic farming may be especially competitive during droughts like the one currently crushing California's massive agricultural sector. A new analysis of more than 100 studies conducted by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, concluded organic farming created a unique mix of biodiversity in the soil and surrounding environment that is difficult to mimic with synthetic chemicals. The researchers analyzed what they say is the largest data set ever compiled on organic and conventional methods across an index of about 50 common crops. For full story, click here. 

Ignoring Indigenous Rights In Amazon Fuels Global Warming – Study 

By Chris Arsenault Thomson – Reuters Foundation – December 2, 2014
More than half the carbon in the Amazon region could be released into the atmosphere unless indigenous land rights are protected, a new study said on Tuesday, as a UN climate conference got under way in Peru. Indigenous territories and protected natural areas across nine South American countries account for more than half the carbon stored in the Amazon, the study published in the journal Carbon Management reported.  For full story, click here

In New Drainage Projects, Long-Buried Urban Streams See the Light Again 

By Brian Clark Howard – National Geographic News – November 25, 2014 – Video
A small stream gurgles under a historic stone bridge, once used by Revolutionary War patriots to transport supplies. For more than a century, the bridge was bricked up, the stream beneath it just a dry, eroded channel. As in many places, this tributary of the Broad Branch stream had been forced underground around the turn of the century, through a program designed to rid Washington, D.C., of surface water. At the time, malaria was a major killer, and cities around the world were draining any kind of standing water or "swamp," out of both a fear of mosquito-borne disease and a desire to create more land for development. For full story and to view video, click here.

California Farmers, EPA Agree To Pesticide Restrictions 

Central Valley Business Times – November 20, 2014
Federal and state agencies, rice growers and industry have created federally enforceable restrictions of the pesticide thiobencarb to protect threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead trout in California’s Central Valley. “We have met the critical environmental and economic goals of protecting threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead trout while maintaining rice production in California,” says Jim Jones, the EPA’s assistant administrator for chemical safety and pollution prevention. “This was achieved by creating a unique approach tailored to specific geographic locations critical to salmon and considering the needs of rice growers.” Will Stelle, administrator of NOAA Fisheries' West Coast Region, says the agreement includes important safeguards for protected fish while still allowing growers to care for their crops. For full story, click here

Senate Defeats Bill on Keystone XL Pipeline in Narrow Vote 

By Ashley Parker and Coral Davenport – The New York Times – November 18, 2014
Senate Democrats, by a single vote, stopped legislation that would have approved construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, one of the most fractious and expensive battles of the Obama presidency. The vote represented a victory for the environmental movement, but the fight had taken on larger dimensions as a proxy war between Republicans, who argued that the project was vital for job creation, and President Obama, who had delayed a decision on building it. For full story, click here.

Water Is the Biggest Output of U.S. Oil And Gas Wells: Kemp 

By John Kemp – Reuters.com – November 18, 2014
The biggest product of the U.S. petroleum industry is not oil, gas or condensate but water -- billions and billions of gallons containing dissolved salts, grease and even naturally occurring radioactive materials. In 2007, when the shale revolution was still in its infant stages, the U.S. oil and gas industry was already producing more than 20 billion barrels of waste water per year, according to researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory (“Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States”, 2009).

The industry’s daily output was 5 million barrels of oil, 67 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 55 million barrels of water, according to federal government statistics. For full story, click here.

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS    
             
WEBINARS     MEETINGS
  TRAINING
   
             
WEBINARS          
                   
JANUARY 2015          
                   
January 6, 2015
3:00 p.m. ET
      Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: Green Infrastructure in Oklahoma: Insights & Lessons Learned          
                   
January 8, 2015
1:00 p.m. ET
      Swamp School Webinar: 2015 Wetland Status & Trends          
                   
January 29, 2015
2:00 p.m. EDT
      Forester University webinar: Voodoo Hydrology— Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods & What You Need to Know           
                   
January 20, 2015
3:00 p.m. ET
      Association of State Wetland Managers Restoration Webinar: Temperate and Tropical/Subtropical Seagrass          
                   

January 21, 2015
3:00 p.m. ET

     

Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors 

         
                   
January 28, 2015
3:00 p.m. ET
      ASWM Members' Wetland Webinar Series: How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message          
                   
January 29, 2015
12 noon- 1:15 p.m. EST
     

Antioch University Webinar: Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment 

This webinar is part of the series, Weathering Change: Local Solutions for Strong Communities, presented by Antioch University New England, in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For more information on this webinar series, click here.
         
                   
                   
MEETINGS             
                   
JANUARY 2015                  
                   
January 7-8, 2015
Washington, DC
      The Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO's) 4th Annual Defense, National Security & Climate Change Symposium          
                   
January 23-24, 2015
East Lansing, Michigan
      Stewardship Network: The Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference          
                   
January 29-31, 2015
Baltimore, Maryland
      Local Government Commission: 14th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference: Practical Tools and Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities          
                   
January 29-31, 2015
New Haven, Connecticut
      The International Society of Tropical Foresters, Yale Chapter Conference: Conserving biodiversity across multiple use landscapes through strategic governance and land-use planning          
                   
FEBRUARY 2015          
                   

February 3-5, 2015
Stevenson, Washington

     

River Restoration Northwest Symposium

Pre-symposium Short Courses - February 2
Field Trip - February 6

         
                   
February 8-11, 2015
Dubuque, Iowa
      Partnership for River Restoration and Science in the Upper Midwest: Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium           
                   
February 11-12, 2015
San Jose, California
      Citizen Science Association: Citizen Science 2015           
                   
February 16-19, 2015
Houston, Texas
      Consortium for Ocean Leadership: 2015 Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference          
                   
February 17-19, 2015 Boise State University
Boise, Idaho
      Great Basin Consortium Conference: Climate programs, water limitations, and geospaces in the Great Basin          
                   
February 17-19, 2015
Duluth, Minnesota
      2015 Joint Annual Meeting Minnesota & Wisconsin Chapters of The Wildlife Society          
                   
February 19-12, 2015 Albuquerque, New Mexico       The Tamarisk Coalition  2015 Conference:  Advancing Riparian Restoration in the West
Call for 
abstracts deadline is January 9, 2015. 
         
                   
February 21, 2015
Fort Christmas Historical Park in Christmas, Florida
      Friends of the Orlando Wetlands: 15th Annual Orlando Wetlands Festival          
                   

February 23-25, 2015 Washington, DC 

      Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Climate Leadership Conference          
                   
February 24-26, 2015
Madison, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 20th Anniversary Wetland Science Conference: Telling Our Stories
         
                   
February 24-27, 2015
Portland, Oregon
      The Society for Northwestern Vertenrate Biology (SNVB) and Northwest Partners in Amphibian and Repitle Conservation: Defining a New Ecological Baseline: Pacific Northwest Fauna and Flora in the Anthropocene          
                   
February 25-26, 2015
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
     

International Conference on Water Management Modeling 

Abstract deadline is February 3, 2015
         
           
MARCH 2015          
                   
March 5-6, 2015
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
     

Wisconsin Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA): Wisconsin Water Resources and Agriculture

         
                   
March 10-12, 2015
Ft. Collins, Colorado
     

High Altitude Revegetation Committee and Central Rockies Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration joint 2015 Conference and Workshop: The High Altitude Restoration Science & Practice

         
                   
March 10-12, 2015
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
      Canadian Water Network (CWR): Connecting Water Resources 2015 - From Knowledge to Action          
                   
March 12-13, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      2015 Annual Land Use Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Building Fair and Resilient Communities          
                   
March 24-26, 2015
Las Cruces, New Mexico
     

Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop: Climate and Drought Information for Food Resilience, Agriculture, and Water Resources

         
                   
March 25, 2015 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts
      New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC): Stormwater Utility Workshop          
                   
March 25-27, 2015 
Berkeley, California
     

UC Berkeley, in partnership with the National Park Service and National Geographic Society: Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century

Abstract deadline: November 1, 2014.
         
                   
March 26-28, 2015
University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware
      Society for Ecological Restoration Mid-Atlantic Chapter Annual Conference: Working Together to Ecologically Restore the Mid-Atlantic Region          
                   
March 28-29, 2015
Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana
     

2015 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference

         
                   
March 30-April 1, 2015
Los Angeles, California
      2015 American Water Resources Association (AWRA) Spring Specialty Conference on Water for Urban Areas          
                   
March 30-April 2, 2015
North Charleston, South Carolina
      Association of State Floodplain Managers: Coastal GeoTools Conference          
                   
APRIL 2015                  
                   
April 10-11, 2015
Vancouver, British Columbia
      International Conference on Climate Change: Impacts and Responses          
                   
April 23-30, 2015
Nairobi, Kenya
     

International Institute for Environment and Development: 9th annual International Conference on Community-Based Adaptation

         
                   
April 27–29, 2015
Syracuse, New York
     

New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 15th Annual Meeting

         
                   
April 28-29, 2015
Freeport, Maine
      NEIWPCC 26th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution: The Watershed Approach: Addressing Today's Challenges with an Eye on the Future          
                   
MAY 2015                  
                   
May 3-5, 2015
Chicago, Illinois
      American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE): Climate Change Symposium - Adaptation and Mitigation          
                   
May 5-8, 2014
Orlando, Florida
      National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Training & Education, Moderated Exchanges, Networking            
                   
May 6-7, 2015
Castlegar, BC, Canada
      Columbia Mountains Institute of Applied Ecology: Regulated Rivers: Environment, Ecology, and Management Conference          
                   
May 6-8, 2015
Sandusky, Ohio
      The Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2015 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 12-14, 2015
St. Louis, Missouri
     

EcoAdapt: National 

         
                   
May 25-29, 2015
Burlington, Vermont
     

International Association for Great Lakes Research (IAGLR): 58th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research

         
                   
May 31-June 4, 2015  Providence, Rhode Island

     

2015 Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting: Changing climate. Changing wetlands

         
                   
JUNE 2015                  
                   
June 1-5, 2015
Buffalo, New York
      University at Buffalo’s Summer Workshop Series in Stream Restoration          
                   
June 15-17, 2015
New Orleans, Louisiana
      American Water Resources Association (AWRA) Specialty Conference: Climate Change Adaptation

Abstracts due by February 13, 2015.
         
                   
June 22-24 2015
Groningen, The Netherlands
     

University of Massachusetts-Amherst: Fish Passage 2015

Important Dates
         
                   
July 2015
                 
                   
July 5-10, 2015
Portland, Oregon
      9th Annual IALE World Congress: Crossing Scales, Crossing Borders; Global Approaches to Complex Challenges

Call for presentations deadline: March 1, 2015
         
                   
July 21-23, 2015
Breckenridge, Colorado
      Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference          
                   
July 27-August 2, 2015
Nagoya Japan  
     

XIX INQUA Congress Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization

Abstract deadline: December 20, 2014
         
                   
AUGUST 2015                  
                   
August 2-5, 2015
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
      21st International Conference on Environmental Indicators          
                   
August 9-14, 2015
Baltimore, Maryland
     

The Ecological Society of America: Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial 

Abstract deadlines
         
                   
August 23-27, 2015
Manchester, England
      Society of Ecological Restoration 6th World Conference on Ecological Restoration: Towards Resilient Ecosystems: Restoring the Urban, the Rual and the Wild           
                   
August 23-28, 2015
La Crosse, Wisconsin
     

4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science

Abstract deadline: January 7, 2015
         
                   
August 23-28, 2015
Stockholm, Sweeden
      Stockholm International Water Institute: 2015 World Water Week          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2015                  
                   
September 23-25, 2015  Baltimore, Maryland      

Resource Institute, Inc.: Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference

Abstract deadline: January 15, 2015
         
                   
TRAINING             
                   
JANUARY 2015                  
                   
January 26-27, 2015 
Basking Ridge, New Jersey
      Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: Winter          
                   
January 26-29, 2015
Sacramento, California
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training          
                   
FEBRUARY 2015                  
                   
February 9-12, 2015
New Orleans, Louisiana
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training          
                   
February 9-13, 2015
San Diego, California
      Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   
February 18-19, 2015
McClellan, California
      The Floodplain Management Association course: 2015 Floodplain Manager’s Guide to Public Participation          
                   
MARCH 2015                  
                   
March 10-12, 2015
McClellan, California
      The Floodplain Management Association course: 2D HEC-RAS Modeling          
                   
March 16-18, 2015
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Treatment Wetlands           
                   
March 23-26, 2015 
Nashville, Tennessee
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training          
                   
APRIL 2015                  
                   
April 23, 2015
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: CEQA and Climate Change: An In-Depth Update          
                   
JUNE 2015                  
                   
June 15-18, 2015
Hastings, Michigan
      Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop 

Other dates: June 29-Jully 2, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa and July 13-16, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana
         
                   
June 22-25, 2015
State College, Pennsylvania
      Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS                  
                   
February 2, 2015       World Wetlands Day 2015: Wetlands for our Future          
                   
April 24-25, 2015
Great Bend, Kansas
      The Kansas Wetlands Education Center, along with Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks & Tourism, The Nature Conservancy, and the Great Bend Convention and Visitors Bureau, hosts this 2-day birding festival every other year on odd numbered years.          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2014

 JOBS

 There are new jobs posted on the Wetland Jobs board. For the latest wetland jobs, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • $1T Spending Deal Aims To Avert Government Shutdown

  • Congress Moving Toward Five-Year Commitment To Continue Great Lakes cleanup

  • A Paper By Maggie Simpson And Edna Krabappel Was Accepted By Two Scientific Journals

  • This West Antarctic Region Sheds a Mount Everest-sized Amount of Ice Every Two Years, Study Says

  • Policy Fight Looms As Agencies Treat Honeybee -- A 17th-Century Import – As Exotic Invader 

  • Can Biomimicry Tackle Our Toughest Water Problems?

  • The Russia-USA Wetland Center Exchange Program: Linking People and Wetlands
    Seeks Wetland Centers for Project Participation

    Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Green Infrastructure in Oklahoma: Insights & Lessons Learned – January 6, 2015

  • ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Temperate and Tropical/Subtropical Seagrass Restoration – January 20, 2015 

  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors January 21, 2015

  • ASWM’s Members’ Webinar: How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message January 28, 2015

NATIONAL NEWS  

  • Scientist With Deep Industry Ties Being Considered For Key EPA Job

  • ALEC Looks To Shred EPA Regulations

  • House Republican Plans to Introduce Pro-Climate-Science Bill

  • US EPA Fighting Order To Decide On Gulf Of Mexico 'Dead Zone' Rule-Making

  • Record Drought Reveals Stunning Changes Along Colorado River

  • Long-Eared Bat Listing Gets Pushback

  • Debate Churns As NOAA Is Set To Open U.S. Waters To Aquaculture

  • EPA to Assist Water Utilities in Bolstering Climate Resilience & Readiness

  • Congress Holds Hearing On Algae Contamination Of Lake Erie Drinking Water

  • Concerns Renewed as Mining Pollutants Increase in Montana Watershed

STATES NEWS 

  • AK: As sea level rises, an Alaska village faces an existential dilemma

  • AK: Federal judge sides with Pebble to halt EPA mine action for now

  • CA:  Animal deaths spike on Sierra roads as drought hits habitat

  • CA: Los Angeles, City of Water

  • CA: Annenberg pulls $45 million for Ballona Wetlands redevelopment

  • CA: Drought revives 'forgotten art' at wineries: Farming without irrigation

  • CO: Colorado weighs taking "waste" out of wastewater to fix shortfall

  • GA: Human tests suggest contamination from Superfund site stretches 25 miles

  • KY: Kentucky regulators defend mining record

  • LA: Louisiana restoration projects should get top priority with BP oil spill

  • fine money, environmental groups say

  • LA: Texas oil company pleads guilty to dumping wastewater into Gulf

  • ME: US waters create potential for shellfish farming

  • MD: Hogan vows to fight farm pollution rules

  • MD: Counties' ambitious stream restoration projects stir debate

  • MN: The border war over cleaned-up Lake Hendricks

  • MT: Not-so-wild wilderness: Mining proposals threaten Cabinet Mountains streams, lakes and grizzlies

  • NJ: Stockton College and the Wetlands Institute formalize partnership

  • NC: NOAA, UNC-Wilmington study finds warming Atlantic ocean temperatures could increase expansion of invasive, native species

  • OH: Ohio House passes anti-algae bill limiting manure, fertilizer on farms

  • OH: Lake Erie water bill would set controversial environmental standards

  • TX: Map shows future of Mustang and Padre islands as sea levels rise

  • TX: Scientists look to reverse sea turtle's sudden decline

  • TX: Report: EPA Power Plan Would Save Texas Water

  • WA: Mammoth $342 million cleanup ahead for fouled Duwamish River

  • WA: Nitrates, fecal coliform from dairies linked to tainted shellfish, tap water

  • WA: Death by dirty water: Storm runoff a risk for fish

  • WV: Former Freedom Industries president facing federal charges

  • WI: Study: Wisconsin groundwater contaminated by coal ash

WETLAND SCIENCE  

  • California Drought The Worst In 1,200 Years, New Study Says

  • Council on Environmental Quality Releases: "President's State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience: Recommendations to the President"

  • Studies Show 2-Degree Climate Goal Is Daunting, but Not Impossible

  • Planning for Climate Change in Michigan Coastal Wetlands

  • EPA Releases Agency-Wide Climate Change Adaptation Plans

  • Scientists Find Likely Culprit Behind Mysterious Sea Star Deaths

  • Top Uses for Remote Sensing In Conservation

  • Scientists Turn To Crowdfunding Sites for Research Money

  • Major Deltas 'Could Be Drowned'

  • The Man With The Salmon Plan

  • More Japanese Tsunami Debris Will Wash Up This Winter On Northwest Shores, Scientists Predict

  • US Names Red Knot Bird A Threatened Species

  • Closing In On ALS? Link Between Lethal Disease And Algae Explored

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • U.S. EPA 'Climate Change Indicators in the United States, 2014' report

  • Report Explains Extreme Events of 2013 from Climate Perspective

  • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Releases Fifth Synthesis Report

POTPOURRI

  • Organic Farming More Drought Resistant: Report

  • Ignoring Indigenous Rights In Amazon Fuels Global Warming – Study

  • In New Drainage Projects, Long-Buried Urban Streams See the Light Again

  • California Farmers, EPA Agree To Pesticide Restrictions

  • Senate Defeats Bill on Keystone XL Pipeline in Narrow Vote

  • Water Is the Biggest Output Of U.S. Oil And Gas Wells: Kemp

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

 Webinars

  • Green Infrastructure in Oklahoma: Insights & Lessons Learned

  • 2015 Wetland Status & Trends  

  • Voodoo Hydrology— Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods & What You Need to Know

  • Temperate and Tropical/Subtropical Seagrass

  • Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors 

  • How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message

  • Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment

Meetings

  • 4th Annual Defense, National Security & Climate Change Symposium

  • The Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference

  • Practical Tools and Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities

  • Conserving biodiversity across multiple use landscapes through strategic governance and land-use planning

  • River Restoration Northwest Symposium

  • Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium

  • Citizen Science 2015 

  • 2015 Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference

  • Climate programs, water limitations, and geospaces in the Great Basin

  • 2015 Joint Annual Meeting Minnesota & Wisconsin Chapters of The Wildlife Society

  • Advancing Riparian Restoration in the West

  • 15th Annual Orlando Wetlands Festival

  • Climate Leadership Conference

  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association 20th Anniversary Wetland Science Conference: Telling Our Stories

  • Defining a New Ecological Baseline: Pacific Northwest Fauna and Flora in the Anthropocene
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

  • Wisconsin Water Resources and Agriculture

  • The High Altitude Restoration Science & Practice

  • Connecting Water Resources 2015 - From Knowledge to Action

  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Building Fair and Resilient Communities

  • Climate and Drought Information for Food Resilience, Agriculture, and Water Resources

  • Stormwater Utility Workshop

  • Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century

  • Working Together to Ecologically Restore the Mid-Atlantic Region

  • 2015 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference

  • Water for Urban Areas

  • Coastal GeoTools Conference

  • Impacts and Responses

  • 9th annual International Conference on Community-Based Adaptation

  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 15th Annual Meeting

  • The Watershed Approach:  Addressing Today's Challenges with an Eye on the Future

  • Climate Change Symposium - Adaptation and Mitigation

  • Training & Education, Moderated Exchanges, Networking 

  • Regulated Rivers: Environment, Ecology, and Management Conference

  • 2015 Ohio Stormwater Conference

  • EcoAdapt: National Adaptation Forum

  • 58th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research

  • Changing climate. Changing wetlands

  • University at Buffalo’s Summer Workshop Series in Stream Restoration

  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) Specialty Conference: Climate Change Adaptation

  • University of Massachusetts-Amherst: Fish Passage 2015

  • Crossing Scales, Crossing Borders; Global Approaches to Complex Challenges

  • Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference

  • Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization

  • 21st International Conference on Environmental Indicators

  • Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial

  • Towards Resilient Ecosystems: Restoring the Urban, the Rual and the Wild

  • 4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science

  • Stockholm International Water Institute: 2015 World Water Week

  • Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference

Training 

  • Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: Winter 

  • Wetland Delineation Training - January

  • Wetland Delineation Training – February

  • Basic Wetland Delineation

  • 2015 Floodplain Manager’s Guide to Public Participation

  • 2D HEC-RAS Modeling

  • Treatment Wetlands

  • Wetland Delineation Training – March

  • CEQA and Climate Change: An In-Depth Update

  • Wetland Flora Workshop

  • Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Wetlands for our Future
  • Wings N Wetlands Birding Festival

PRINT THIS ISSUE

Wetland Breaking News

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over ten years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.  

Wetland Breaking News - December 2014The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to news@aswm.org.

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Alan Grant and Marla Stelk, Editors; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie.  Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

 All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

                           Association of State Wetland Managers          Find us on Facebook        

Join our Group on Linkedin