Webcasts and Multi-media

Webinar Series: Stormwater Master Planning


Vermont DEC 

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Ecosystem Restoration Program, in association with Watershed Consulting Associates, will present a series of five webinars covering several differentmodel templates to be considered when developing a stormwater master plan for your site or community. Each webinar will discuss general and specific methods to use, what type of community should consider using each template, and funding sources that each template’s proposed projects will qualify for under State of Vermont funding guidelines. Space is limited to 100 participants. Register now, it’s free!

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Webinar: Extreme Climate Events and Species Population Dynamics: Overriding Influence


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – September 9, 2014

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar on Extreme Climate Events and Species Population Dynamics: Overriding Influence or Not Such a Big Deal? This webinar will be held on September 9, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. EDT. Extreme events (floods, droughts, and fires) have a high public profile and changes in their frequency, magnitude, and duration have been linked to changes in climate. For species populations, these events are often associated with high levels of mortality and major changes in habitat, suggesting a strong influence on population dynamics. At the same time, the life history and reproductive strategy of many species, particularly those associated with highly seasonal and variable climates, may mitigate the long-term effects of extreme events relative to more gradual changes in climate. Given the difficulty of accurately forecasting climate extremes understanding their role in population dynamics is critical for effective management and climate adaptation. In this talk, we review some of the basic determinants of population response to extreme events, using case studies based on long-term data from natural populations in the northeastern region, and present a modeling framework for evaluating the relative impacts of changes in timing, duration, and magnitude. We also consider the potential for human responses to perceived and actual risks from climate extremes to interact with, and in some cases override the direct effects of the events themselves. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Predicting Climate Change Impacts on River Ecosystems and Salmonids across the Pacific Northwest


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – October 14, 2014

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar onPredicting Climate Change Impacts on River Ecosystems and Salmonids across the Pacific Northwest to be held on October 14, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. Trout and salmon populations, which play a critical role in many ecosystems and economies, have dramatically declined in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) due to habitat degradation and fragmentation and introductions of invasive species, and are expected to be further impacted by future climate change. Understanding how climate change will influence the abundance, distribution, genetic diversity, and value of these native fish species is crucial for their management and recovery. This project will use modeling techniques to study how climate change might affect freshwater habitats of key trout and salmon species throughout the PNW. The goal of the study is to develop and provide novel tools that will help managers predict and respond to potential climate change induced impacts on habitats, populations, and economies. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Development of a Global Change Monitoring Portal: Pilot Project for the Southeastern US


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – August 26, 2014

The USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar on the Development of a Global Change Monitoring Portal: Pilot Project for the Southeastern US. This webinar will be held on August 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. A significant challenge faced by climate scientists and land managers in the public and private sectors is the need for reliable and complete information about the status of ecosystem components (e.g. air, land, water, plants, animals) that may be influenced by climate change. While many organizations monitor one or more aspect of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, these monitoring programs are seldom coordinated and the associated data are not readily discoverable. The Global Change Monitoring Portal (GCMP) is a recently released tool of the DOI Southeast Climate Science Center designed to support the efforts of multiple federal, state, and other organizations by connecting them to these data resources. The GCMP will provide a centralized, comprehensive catalog of information about monitoring networks associated with aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that can be used to assess the potential effects of climate change in the southeastern United States. Monitoring programs are classified according to the types of observations made, such as media and parameter category, and monitoring sites are mapped into geographic categories such as Ecoregion and Landscape Conservation Cooperative, so that the database can be searched and displayed by measurement and/or geographic criteria. This webinar will introduce some of the features of the Global Change Monitoring Portal, currently in the first phase of development. For more information click here or godirectly here.

Webinar: Making decisions in complex landscapes: Headwater stream management across multiple agencies using structured decision making


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – November 19, 2014

The Northeast Climate Science Center (NCSC) will hold a webinar on Making decisions in complex landscapes: Headwater stream management across multiple agencies using structured decision making to be held on November 19, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. EST. There is growing evidence that headwater stream ecosystems are vulnerable to changing climate and land use, but their conservation is challenged by the need to address the threats at a landscape scale, often through coordination with multiple management agencies and landowners. A decision faced by managers of headwater systems is how to best manage stream habitats to maximize their suitability for multiple species of conservation concern, including stream salamanders and brook trout, which occur in different parts of a stream network, are affected by both the terrestrial landscape and each other, and are likely influenced by future climate change. Because streams and terrestrial habitats are linked, decisions relating to forest management are often linked with stream ecosystem outcomes. Regional management authorities have two important scales of management objectives: long-term objectives that operate at the regional scale and short-term objectives that operate at the local scale and reflected in agency mandates and missions. Identifying obstacles to and opportunities for shared decision making among resource agencies and managers may lead to improvements in the selection of optimal management strategies for landscape-scale resources.This project provides an example of cooperative landscape decision-making to address the conservation of headwater stream ecosystems in the face of climate change using case studies from two watersheds in the northeastern U.S. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Developing forest adaptation strategies for northern forests in an uncertain future


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – October 1, 2014

The Northeast Climate Science Center (NECSC) will hold a webinar on Developing forest adaptation strategies for northern forests in an uncertain future" to be held on October 1, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. EDT. Climate change and associated stressors are expected to greatly impact the ability of forest managers to sustainably manage and conserve forest habitats across the northeastern United States. As a result, adaptation strategies are being developed and applied in many regions to minimize climate change impacts and sustain key forest functions under uncertain future environmental conditions. Given that many of these strategies deviate from traditional approaches to forest management, there is a great need for field evaluations of adaptation in practice to inform long-term planning efforts to address climate change impacts. Similarly, the long timeframes over which forests develop and management actions operate has increased the importance of decision support tools, such as forest and landscape-simulation models, to evaluate forest conservation practices under future climate change scenarios. This webinar will highlight the importance of field-based studies for assessing the effectiveness of adaptation strategies at addressing climate change and invasive species impacts and will provide an example of how landscape simulation models are being applied to identify forest conservation priorities for highly vulnerable, spruce-fir ecosystems in the northeastern United States. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Building Climate Resiliency with Green Infrastructure


EPA – July 22, 2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will hold a webinar on July 22, 2014 on Building Climate Resiliency with Green Infrastructure from 1:00-2:30 p.m. EDT. This 90-minute webcast will highlight Climate Interactive’s new Green Infrastructure Decision Support Tool, followed by a presentation on the New York City Green Infrastructure Program’s efforts to incorporate climate resiliency into system planning. Communities are feeling the effects of climate change now. As different parts of the country become drier or wetter, green infrastructure can improve resiliency by helping communities manage flood risk, prepare for drought, reduce urban heat island effects, and protect coasts. There is no one-size-fits-all answer to climate adaptation. However, sharing best practices, learning by doing, and iterative problem solving can help communities choose a suite of adaptation strategies to meet environmental, quality of life and public health goals. For more information and to register, click here.