Webcasts and Multi-media

Webinar: Landscape-scale Identification of Actually Restorable Wetlands

 
Rock River Coalition and Environmental Law Institute – October 21, 2014

The Rock River Coalition and Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Landscape-scale Identification of Actually Restorable Wetlands: An overview of a procedure for identifying restorable wetlands at large scales will be held on October 21, 2014 at 3:00 p.m.This talk will outline a procedure for identifying restorable wetlands at large scales. Scott Taylor, ecologist and owner of Taylor Conservation LLC, will share preliminary results of his work in the Rock River basin that brings together GIS analysis and rapid field reconnaissance to locate the most promising wetland restoration sites. The fuller picture gives insights into the potential of wetland restoration for watershed-wide reduction of polluted surface water run-off and enlargement of wildlife corridors. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Wetland Mapping Consortium

 

ASWM – September 17, 2014

The Association of State Wetland Manager will hold a Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar on September 17, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Part 1: A Help Guide for Using gSSURGO to Find Potential Wetland Soil Landscapes – John Galbraith, Virginia Tech and Part 2: Applications of SSURGO soil attributes to potentially restorable wetlands – Kevin Stark, Saint Mary’s University. For more information, click here.

Webinar Series: Stormwater Master Planning


Vermont DEC 

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Ecosystem Restoration Program, in association with Watershed Consulting Associates, will present a series of five webinars covering several differentmodel templates to be considered when developing a stormwater master plan for your site or community. Each webinar will discuss general and specific methods to use, what type of community should consider using each template, and funding sources that each template’s proposed projects will qualify for under State of Vermont funding guidelines. Space is limited to 100 participants. Register now, it’s free!

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Webinar: Extreme Climate Events and Species Population Dynamics: Overriding Influence


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – September 9, 2014

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar on Extreme Climate Events and Species Population Dynamics: Overriding Influence or Not Such a Big Deal? This webinar will be held on September 9, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. EDT. Extreme events (floods, droughts, and fires) have a high public profile and changes in their frequency, magnitude, and duration have been linked to changes in climate. For species populations, these events are often associated with high levels of mortality and major changes in habitat, suggesting a strong influence on population dynamics. At the same time, the life history and reproductive strategy of many species, particularly those associated with highly seasonal and variable climates, may mitigate the long-term effects of extreme events relative to more gradual changes in climate. Given the difficulty of accurately forecasting climate extremes understanding their role in population dynamics is critical for effective management and climate adaptation. In this talk, we review some of the basic determinants of population response to extreme events, using case studies based on long-term data from natural populations in the northeastern region, and present a modeling framework for evaluating the relative impacts of changes in timing, duration, and magnitude. We also consider the potential for human responses to perceived and actual risks from climate extremes to interact with, and in some cases override the direct effects of the events themselves. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Predicting Climate Change Impacts on River Ecosystems and Salmonids across the Pacific Northwest


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – October 14, 2014

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar onPredicting Climate Change Impacts on River Ecosystems and Salmonids across the Pacific Northwest to be held on October 14, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. Trout and salmon populations, which play a critical role in many ecosystems and economies, have dramatically declined in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) due to habitat degradation and fragmentation and introductions of invasive species, and are expected to be further impacted by future climate change. Understanding how climate change will influence the abundance, distribution, genetic diversity, and value of these native fish species is crucial for their management and recovery. This project will use modeling techniques to study how climate change might affect freshwater habitats of key trout and salmon species throughout the PNW. The goal of the study is to develop and provide novel tools that will help managers predict and respond to potential climate change induced impacts on habitats, populations, and economies. For more information, click here.

Webinar: Development of a Global Change Monitoring Portal: Pilot Project for the Southeastern US


National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center – August 26, 2014

The USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center will hold a webinar on the Development of a Global Change Monitoring Portal: Pilot Project for the Southeastern US. This webinar will be held on August 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. A significant challenge faced by climate scientists and land managers in the public and private sectors is the need for reliable and complete information about the status of ecosystem components (e.g. air, land, water, plants, animals) that may be influenced by climate change. While many organizations monitor one or more aspect of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, these monitoring programs are seldom coordinated and the associated data are not readily discoverable. The Global Change Monitoring Portal (GCMP) is a recently released tool of the DOI Southeast Climate Science Center designed to support the efforts of multiple federal, state, and other organizations by connecting them to these data resources. The GCMP will provide a centralized, comprehensive catalog of information about monitoring networks associated with aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that can be used to assess the potential effects of climate change in the southeastern United States. Monitoring programs are classified according to the types of observations made, such as media and parameter category, and monitoring sites are mapped into geographic categories such as Ecoregion and Landscape Conservation Cooperative, so that the database can be searched and displayed by measurement and/or geographic criteria. This webinar will introduce some of the features of the Global Change Monitoring Portal, currently in the first phase of development. For more information click here or godirectly here.