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More money for climate change: will Warsaw deliver?
Monday, 02 December 2013 00:00

By Helena Wright – The Guardian – November 27, 2013

Following Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, there have been increasing calls for more financial investment to prevent climate change. Scientists warn that climate-related disasters such as the Philippines typhoon will become more frequent and intense in a warmer world. For full story, click here.

 
Climate change could mean a longer tornado season in Illinois
Monday, 02 December 2013 00:00

By Elizabeth McCarthy – Medill Reports  November 26, 2013

The recent off-season tornadoes that claimed 15 counties as disaster areas may become more commonplace in Illinois as the effects of climate change alter weather patterns in the state, experts warn. “Now most of our tornadoes happen in the springtime and early summer. But we might see more and more of them year round,” said Jim Angel, the Illinois state climatologist. For full story, click here.

 
Climate Change Makes Any Disaster Global
Monday, 25 November 2013 00:00

By Gillen D'Arcy Wood – Bloomberg – November 18, 2013

Historians may look back at Typhoon Haiyan as a turning point in disaster journalism and the politics of climate change. For the first time, an extreme-weather catastrophe in the tropics has shrugged off its “made in Asia” label and gone global. For full story, click here.

 
Climate Change May Affect Butterfly Flight Season
Monday, 25 November 2013 00:00

By Allison Winter – Environmental News Network – November 22, 2013

Most butterflies will become active or wake from hibernation during the first warm days of spring. However, emerging too early and facing unpredictable elements could be detrimental to the survival of the butterfly as they could encounter frost and harsher weather during consequent days of their short adult lives. According to new research from the University of British Columbia, the Université de Sherbrooke and the University of Ottawa, increasing temperatures caused by global climate change will ultimately affect the flight season timing of these winged beauties. For full story, click here.

 
Climate Change Increases Storm Severity and Toxic Chemical Hazards
Monday, 18 November 2013 00:00

eNews Park Forest – November 13, 2013

As the world sheds tears from reading the reports of human suffering and looks on in horror at the pictures of devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan, the debate of whether increased occurrences of super-storms like Haiyan are just over the horizon because of man-made climate change have also taken up residence in the headlines. Coupled by coverage of the 19th session of the Conference of the Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change and the leak of a draft summary of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest report on the impacts of global warming, the world is clearly paying attention. For full story, click here.

 
Combining climate-change adaptation & mitigation: a win-win option
Monday, 25 November 2013 13:07

By Barbara Fraser – Thomson Reuters Foundation – November 16, 2013

Although rural landscapes can be managed to optimize both climate-change mitigation and adaptation, many climate-oriented development projects fail to take advantage of the combined benefits, according to Bruno Locatelli, a scientist with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD). With careful planning, landscapes can be managed to emphasize the synergies between adaptation and mitigation while balancing the trade-offs, he said at a conference at the Tropical Agriculture Research and Higher Education Center (Centro Agronómico Tropical de Investigación y Enseñanza, CATIE) in Costa Rica in October. For full story, click here.

 
Impacts of climate change observed in global precipitation patterns
Monday, 25 November 2013 00:00

By Kate Prengaman – Ars Technica –  November 16, 2013

More evidence turned up this week indicating that climate change impacts are already underway—this time in rainfall patterns. It's pretty hard to clearly link climate change to individual droughts, like the summer of 2012 in the United States, or specific storms, like Hurricane Haiyan that devastated the Philippines last week. These events are driven by a complex set of factors, including natural variations. But new research that tracked a broad look at precipitation patterns found that they have already shifted beyond the bounds of natural variations. For full story, click here.

More evidence turned up this week indicating that climate change impacts are already underway—this time in rainfall patterns. It's pretty hard to clearly link climate change to individual droughts, like the summer of 2012 in the United States, or specific storms, like Hurricane Haiyan that devastated the Philippines last week. These events are driven by a complex set of factors, including natural variations. But new research that tracked a broad look at precipitation patterns found that they have already shifted beyond the bounds of natural variations
 
Investors Sound the Alarm on Climate Change
Monday, 18 November 2013 00:00

By Ryan Bradley – CNN Money  – October 24, 2013

If human-caused climate change is accepted as a certainty -- it is, by 95% of scientists (a higher percentage, by the way, than agree that smoking causes cancer) -- what are the ramifications for business? If you are in the keeping-back-the-sea biz, rising seas will likely be a boon. If you seek out and extract carbon from the earth (oil or coal, mostly) to be burned as energy and released into the atmosphere, climate change might be a very grave problem indeed. For full story, click here.

 
Monitoring of carbon-rich wetlands a focus at UN climate talks
Monday, 11 November 2013 12:24

By Barbara Fraser – Thomas Reuters Foundation – November 6, 2013

New guidelines for calculating carbon emissions from wetlands will provide a more accurate picture of buried treasure — a massive amount of carbon on a scale that is often underestimated and often unnoticed because it is stored underground, experts say. Tropical wetlands, including palm swamps and mangroves, are important carbon sinks, but as much as 80 percent of that carbon is stored in a submerged layer of peat. Because the depth and extent of the peat layer can vary, it is difficult to measure the volume and calculate the amount of carbon stored there. For full story, click here.

 
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